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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Lisa A.W. Kensler and Cynthia L. Uline

The purpose of this paper is to articulate, and advocate for, a deep shift in how the authors conceptualize and enact school leadership and reform. The authors challenge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to articulate, and advocate for, a deep shift in how the authors conceptualize and enact school leadership and reform. The authors challenge fundamental conceptions regarding educational systems and call for a dramatic shift from the factory model to a living systems model of schooling. The authors call is not a metaphorical call. The authors propose embracing assumptions grounded in the basic human nature as living systems. Green school leaders, practicing whole school sustainability, provide emerging examples of educational restoration.

Design/methodology/approach

School reform models have implicitly and even explicitly embraced industrialized assumptions about students and learning. Shifting from the factory model of education to a living systems model of whole school sustainability requires transformational strategies more associated with nature and life than machines. Ecological restoration provides the basis for the model of educational restoration.

Findings

Educational restoration, as proposed here, makes nature a central player in the conversations about ecologies of learning, both to improve the quality of learning for students and to better align educational practice with social, economic and environmental needs of the time. Educational leaders at all levels of the educational system have critical roles to play in deconstructing factory model schooling and reform. The proposed framework for educational restoration raises new questions and makes these opportunities visible. Discussion of this framework begins with ecological circumstances and then addresses, values, commitment and judgments.

Practical implications

Educational restoration will affect every aspect of teaching, learning and leading. It will demand new approaches to leadership preparation. This new landscape of educational practice is wide open for innovative approaches to research, preparation and practice across the field of educational leadership.

Originality/value

The model of educational restoration provides a conceptual foundation for future research and leadership practice.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2013

Gianluca Manzo

In their authoritative literature review, Breen and Jonsson (2005) claim that ‘one of the most significant trends in the study of inequalities in educational attainment in…

Abstract

In their authoritative literature review, Breen and Jonsson (2005) claim that ‘one of the most significant trends in the study of inequalities in educational attainment in the past decade has been the resurgence of rational-choice models focusing on educational decision making’. The starting point of the present contribution is that these models have largely ignored the explanatory relevance of social interactions. To remedy this shortcoming, this paper introduces a micro-founded formal model of the macro-level structure of educational inequality, which frames educational choices as the result of both subjective ability/benefit evaluations and peer-group pressures. As acknowledged by Durlauf (2002, 2006) and Akerlof (1997), however, while the social psychology and ethnographic literature provides abundant empirical evidence of the explanatory relevance of social interactions, statistical evidence on their causal effect is still flawed by identification and selection bias problems. To assess the relative explanatory contribution of the micro-level and network-based mechanisms hypothesised, the paper opts for agent-based computational simulations. In particular, the technique is used to deduce the macro-level consequences of each mechanism (sequentially introduced) and to test these consequences against French aggregate individual-level survey data. The paper's main result is that ability and subjective perceptions of education benefits, no matter how intensely differentiated across agent groups, are not sufficient on their own to generate the actual stratification of educational choices across educational backgrounds existing in France at the beginning of the twenty-first century. By computational counterfactual manipulations, the paper proves that network-based interdependencies among educational choices are instead necessary, and that they contribute, over and above the differentiation of ability and of benefit perceptions, to the genesis of educational stratification by amplifying the segregation of the educational choices that agents make on the basis of purely private ability/benefit calculations.

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Amel Abdyssalam Alhaag, Goran Savic, Gordana Milosavljevic, Milan Tima Segedinac and Milorad Filipovic

The purpose of this research is to enable dynamic customization of metadata that describes educational resources in digital repositories.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to enable dynamic customization of metadata that describes educational resources in digital repositories.

Design/methodology/approach

Users need to describe educational resources in digital repositories according to a user-specific metadata set. As users generally do not have the skills to customize the software application manually, this approach relies on the techniques of model-driven software engineering, which should allow customization of the software application programmatically with no need to develop or order a new software application. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the proposed solution.

Findings

A software platform for managing educational resources described by dynamically extendable metadata is proposed. The platform enables the creation of data models that are programmatically transformed to a Web application for the management of educational resources. In this way, users can create their own models of metadata that are relevant in a particular domain.

Research limitations/implications

The solution has been verified by users with technical knowledge. The appropriateness of the model should still be explored for domain experts with little technical knowledge who desire to define new metadata in their domain.

Practical implications

The solution can be used for digital repositories that store diverse educational resources. Each resource could be described using metadata that relates to the domain the resource belongs to.

Originality/value

Digital repositories standardly describe educational resources using some general metadata, which are more focused on the physical characteristics of resources rather than their semantics. The proposed solution introduces custom domain-specific semantics into the description of the resources, which improves their retrieval.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Michael Groenendyk

The number of 3D models available on the internet to both students and educators is rapidly expanding. Not only are the 3D model collections of popular websites like…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of 3D models available on the internet to both students and educators is rapidly expanding. Not only are the 3D model collections of popular websites like Thingiverse.com growing, organizations such as the Smithsonian Institution and NASA have also recently begun to build collections of 3D models and make these openly accessible online. Yet, even with increased interest in 3D printing and 3D scanning technologies, little is known about the overall structure of the 3D models available on the internet. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

To initiate this project, a list was built of 33 of the most widely used 3D model websites on the internet. Freely downloadable models, as well as models available for purchase or as 3D printed objects were included in the list. Once the list of 33 websites was created, the data for each individual 3D model in the collections was manually assembled and recorded. The titles of the 3D models, keywords, subject headings, license information, and number of views and downloads were recorded, as this information was available. The data were gathered between January and May 2015, and compiled into a CSV database. To determine how online 3D model content relates to a variety of educational disciplines, relevant subject terms for a variety of educational disciples were extracted from the EBSCO database system. With this list of subject terms in hand, the keywords in the CSV database of model information were searched for each of the subject terms, with an automated process using a Perl script.

Findings

There have been many teachers, professors, librarians and students who have purchased 3D printers with little or no 3D modelling skills. Without these skills the owners of these 3D printers are entirely reliant on the content created and freely shared by others to make use of their 3D printers. As the data collected for this research paper shows, the vast majority of open 3D model content available online pertains to the professions already well versed in 3D modelling and Computer Aided Design design, such as engineering and architecture.

Originality/value

Despite that fact that librarians, teachers and other educators are increasingly using technologies that rely on open 3D model content as educational tools, no research has yet been done to assess the number of 3D models available online and what educational disciplines this content relates to. This paper attempts to fill this gap, providing an overview of the size of this content, the educational disciplines this content relates to and who has so far been responsible for developing this content. This information will be valuable to librarians and teachers currently working with technology such as 3D printers and virtual reality, as well as those considering investing in this technology.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Yin Cheong Cheng and Wai Ming Tam

Suggests that there is a strong emphasis on the pursuit of education quality in ongoing educational reforms in both local and international contexts. Policies issued to…

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Abstract

Suggests that there is a strong emphasis on the pursuit of education quality in ongoing educational reforms in both local and international contexts. Policies issued to implement educational changes for education quality often fail because of lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex nature of education quality in schools or higher education institutions. Introduces seven models of quality in education: the goals and specifications model; the resources input model; the process model; the satisfaction model; the legitimacy model; the absence of problems model; and the organizational learning model. Concludes that these models can form a comprehensive framework for understanding and conceptualizing quality in education from different perspectives and facilitating development of management strategies for achieving it. The framework can contribute to ongoing policy discussion, school practice, and research development on issues of quality in education institutions.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Hui-Wen Vivian Tang and Tzu-chin Rojoice Chou

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the forecasting performance of grey prediction models on educational attainment vis-à-vis that of exponential smoothing combined…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the forecasting performance of grey prediction models on educational attainment vis-à-vis that of exponential smoothing combined with multiple linear regression employed by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

Design/methodology/approach

An out-of-sample forecasting experiment was carried out to compare the forecasting performances on educational attainments among GM(1,1), GM(1,1) rolling, FGM(1,1) derived from the grey system theory and exponential smoothing prediction combined with multivariate regression. The predictive power of each model was measured based on MAD, MAPE, RMSE and simple F-test of equal variance.

Findings

The forecasting efficiency evaluated by MAD, MAPE, RMSE and simple F-test of equal variance revealed that the GM(1,1) rolling model displays promise for use in forecasting educational attainment.

Research limitations/implications

Since the possible inadequacy of MAD, MAPE, RMSE and F-type test of equal variance was documented in the literature, further large-scale forecasting comparison studies may be done to test the prediction powers of grey prediction and its competing out-of-sample forecasts by other alternative measures of accuracy.

Practical implications

The findings of this study would be useful for NCES and professional forecasters who are expected to provide government authorities and education policy makers with accurate information for planning future policy directions and optimizing decision-making.

Originality/value

As a continuing effort to evaluate the forecasting efficiency of grey prediction models, the present study provided accumulated evidence for the predictive power of grey prediction on short-term forecasts of educational statistics.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

JAMES F. MCNAMARA

This paper is devoted to the topic of how mathematics might be more efficiently used in educational administration. The position taken here is that mathematics is a branch…

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5383

Abstract

This paper is devoted to the topic of how mathematics might be more efficiently used in educational administration. The position taken here is that mathematics is a branch of philosophy whose subject matter is a set of abstract entities and identified operational rules. It is a vocabulary of symbols that can be used to label objects and, more importantly, a set of grammatical rules for using the vocabulary. The paper begins with a review of some recent developments reported in the social science literature on the uses of mathematics in political science, sociology and economics, and ends with some illustrations of how these developments could lead to similar applications in both the practice and theory domains of educational administration.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Abstract

Education reform and policy formation have become national priorities in all of the Gulf States that make up the six member Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). This move toward developing and sustaining effective education provision for the national citizenry gained greater importance in the wake of the Arab Spring movement that swept across the region. Although not as directly impacted as some other Arab nations further north, the leadership of Gulf States recognized that the large youth demographic in the region needed greater education and employment options, partly to stem the tide of unrest in their own nations. Many Gulf States, including the Kingdom of Bahrain, were already looking overseas for education models and systems that they could “buy-in” and implement in local schools. One such provider that seemed attractive to Bahrain, among others, was Singapore, which is widely hailed in the Gulf region as a model of a high-performing, global economy and education system. Yet importation of foreign models, with little or no accommodations made for local needs and cultures leads to an uncomfortable “grafting” of systems that seem out of place. This, coupled with the desire by Gulf States to take part in international benchmarking exercises, such as TIMSS, has created an awkward skewing in many educational practices and processes in Bahrain and other GCC states. This chapter, using Bahrain as a case study, will explore the regional importation of systems and models and the effect that participation in international assessments is having on localized education practices.

Details

Education for a Knowledge Society in Arabian Gulf Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-834-1

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Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Andrey I. Pilipenko, Olga L. Pilipenko and Zoya A. Pilipenko

The aim of the chapter is to develop some approaches to turn education, predetermining the quality of human capital, into the most important factor of national inclusive…

Abstract

The aim of the chapter is to develop some approaches to turn education, predetermining the quality of human capital, into the most important factor of national inclusive development. This problem is titled by the World Bank Report (2018) as “Learning: to realize education’s promise.” There has been revealed a fundamental contradiction between the two processes: the training technology is improved, the treasury of knowledge is enriched, the scientific progress accelerates, on one side, but on the other side, according to the international Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) study (2015), about 28% of the Russian 15-year-olds, for example, did not master the minimum necessary skills in at least one area of the three (natural science, mathematics, and communication in their native language). Meanwhile the correlation between educational and economic “failures” is high. Reduction in school failure in half (up to 15%) corresponds to the growth of the country’s GDP by 2% at the perspective of 10 years, by 5–6% – in 20 years, and by over 10% – in 30 years. The authors identify and substantiate the most important factor of the low basic knowledge of schoolchildren: it deals with the phenomenon of stable psychological and cognitive barriers in their minds. As a result of this theory, a model of educational consciousness has been developed, which makes it possible to overcome educational failure and to form algorithms for successful learning.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Alexander W. Wiseman and Emily Anderson

Much of the literature on innovation and entrepreneurship in education focuses on how external ideas, processes, and techniques can be applied to education systems…

Abstract

Much of the literature on innovation and entrepreneurship in education focuses on how external ideas, processes, and techniques can be applied to education systems, schools, and classrooms to improve educational performance. Little research, however, addresses the ways that internal ideas, processes, and techniques within educational systems, schools, and classrooms impart innovation and entrepreneurial skills to youth worldwide. This chapter identifies ways that these skills can be developed in youth through mass education systems. Particular attention is given to the ways that youth are prepared to participate in the knowledge economy by becoming information innovators and knowledge entrepreneurs.

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