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1 – 10 of over 19000
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Meng Wang and Miguel Baptista Nunes

This study aims to present a meta-analysis of the use of serious educational games in museums. The analysis is based on a critical literature review that maps educational

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a meta-analysis of the use of serious educational games in museums. The analysis is based on a critical literature review that maps educational roles of museums against serious educational games used in support of those roles. The meta-analysis focuses on the specific context of informal learning in museums.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design presented in this study is based on a meta-analysis research design that consists of a critical literature review, a multi-matrix representation of findings of the literature review and a conceptual visualization of the multidisciplinary area of the usage of serious games in support of educational roles in museums.

Findings

Clear and detailed categorizations of educational roles and serious games types for informal learning are presented. These are followed by matching these educational roles with published reports of the use of serious games within museums. The study concludes with observations and a conceptual map of the design of serious games for museums.

Originality/value

This study presents the first meta-analysis of research in this emergent multidisciplinary field. It will help serious game designers, museum educators and educational practitioners to make decisions regarding the choice of game type, customization and content design to support informal learning in the specific context of museum educational activities.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Sabiha Yeni and Kursat Cagiltay

The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the design principles of educational games in the context of an educational math game example to educational game

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the design principles of educational games in the context of an educational math game example to educational game developers and instructors. Especially, it tries to demonstrate the importance of the academic content-fantasy integration and entertainment factors of educational games from the viewpoint of the experts. For this purpose, as a sample, an educational math game was examined to see how successful is the academic aspect, fantasy aspect, academic-fantasy aspects integration and enjoyment aspect of the game. Good aspects of the game and aspects need improvement were summarized for guidance to game developers while producing educational games.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, heuristic evaluation method was used for evaluating the educational math game. In the scope of this study, an example of modern educational computer game was examined by experts in this study. The integration of academic-fantasy context and enjoyment aspects of the game were analyzed deeply by using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods together.

Findings

According to Relevance Embedding Translation Adaptation Immersion and Naturalization rubric results, embedding element received the highest mean score. It showed that the academic content is well coupled with the fantasy/story content. According to GameFlow criteria, clear goals and feedback sections got the highest scores; on the contrary immersion section got the lowest score. Immersion element of the game should be improved. According to the interview findings, more than half of the participants stated that, in terms of academic content of game, players can actively be involved in learning process during the game. The story of the game and elements used in the game have counterpart in daily life. Didactic elements do not affect learners’ flow in the game. It is easy to learn and feedbacks are enough and useful.

Originality/value

This study offered suggestions to designers for developing good educational games which are well balanced with academic and fantasy context.

Details

Program, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Sean C. Duncan

Games and learning research has diverged into “games for learning” and “games as learning” research. This paper aims to provide a third framing, “games with learning”…

Abstract

Purpose

Games and learning research has diverged into “games for learning” and “games as learning” research. This paper aims to provide a third framing, “games with learning”, that can help address the lived experiences learners have with these media outside of formal, instructional contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a critical analysis of the current games and learning field, considering what has been missed by recent research in the field and how we might benefit from further consideration of what Bernard Suits calls the “lusory attitude” or voluntary choice to accept inefficiencies in achieving goals. The paper analyzes dominant rhetoric of educational game research, with the intent of revealing the implicit assumptions about play and choice that much recent “games for learning” and “games as learning” work may have ignored.

Findings

The paper reveals that the further consideration of learning through extant play with games (characterized here as “games with learning”) can be a means of shifting the direction of educational games research toward investigations of how games are played “in the wilds” of out-of-school contexts. The paper advocates for a shifting of focus from compulsory contexts to the study of voluntary game play.

Social implications

The paper argues for the complex value of games and gameplay in non-institutional settings, and advocates for further research to understand games in non-institutional spaces.

Originality/value

The key argument is that games and learning to date has focused inordinately on how games can further educational design, rather than how the use of games can reveal important new contexts for learning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Mikhail Fiadotau, Martin Sillaots and Indrek Ibrus

This chapter introduces the topic of cooperation and co-innovation between the audiovisual media and education sectors. It first discusses the emergence of educational

Abstract

This chapter introduces the topic of cooperation and co-innovation between the audiovisual media and education sectors. It first discusses the emergence of educational film approximately a hundred years go – together with a new institutional framework, industry media, rulebooks, etc. It then discusses the ways public service media have addressed educational programming over the decades, including developing complex cross-media strategies and educational content databases more recently. The second half of the chapter is dedicated to the emergence of educational digital games, with their own institutional setups, production cultures, and training programmes. The chapter points, however, to a relative lack of cooperation between commercial game producers and educational institutions to date.

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Karin Danielsson and Charlotte Wiberg

This paper reports on how prospective users may be involved in the design of entertaining educational computer games. The paper illustrates an approach, which combines…

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Abstract

This paper reports on how prospective users may be involved in the design of entertaining educational computer games. The paper illustrates an approach, which combines traditional Participatory Design methods in an applicable way for this type of design. Results illuminate the users’ important contribution during game development, especially when intended for a specific target group. Unless prospective members of the target group are consulted it is difficult to foresee opinions of game content, aesthetics and the overall game experience of the users ‐ aspects very much included or at least related to the theoretical concept of intrinsic motivation. Whereas pedagogical experts can contribute with learning content, the users are the ones who can state what is actually fun or not. Users’ participation during the design process enables development of games that are directed to the learners and their expectations. The researchers collaborated with a multimedia design team in development of an educational web‐based computer game, developed for the Swedish Broadcasting Corporation.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Mia Consalvo

Aims to determine how multiple play styles and use of “outside” materials can be successfully taken into account when designing user experiences in educational digital games.

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to determine how multiple play styles and use of “outside” materials can be successfully taken into account when designing user experiences in educational digital games.

Design/methodology/approach

This research draws on over two dozen qualitative interviews and an open‐ended survey of an additional 50 game players with a wide range of gameplay experience.

Findings

Findings suggest that players have different skill sets, and different beliefs about what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable help in a variety of games. These findings are analyzed to argue for different ways to enhance the educational gaming experience for players.

Research limitations/implications

As with all qualitative research, the relatively small sample size makes it difficult to draw broad generalizations from the data. However, the research does suggest that there are many ways to play games, that players use many items and information “outside” the game to help them play or enhance their experience, and such things can be fruitfully used to improve educational games.

Practical implications

Designers of educational games should take into account the materials surrounding games, such as walkthroughs and codes, as ways to enhance the game and educational experience, rather than detract from them.

Originality/value

Very little research has been done examining how players perceive items and information related to game play, as well as how they use such things. This research investigates that area and relates the knowledge to ways to improve educational games, and education.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Boyan Paskalev Bontchev, Valentina Terzieva and Elena Paunova-Hubenova

The purpose of this paper is to present principles for personalization of both learning content and gameplay in serious games for learning, which are based on a combined…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present principles for personalization of both learning content and gameplay in serious games for learning, which are based on a combined model of the student that comprises user, learner and player-related aspects of the student’s profile. Each of the considered user, learner and player sub-models has a static and dynamic group of characteristics. These characteristics assist general approaches for learning mazes game personalization applied to embedded mini-games (designed as information units, learning objects and educational tasks) so that to be adjustable and to enable learners to acquire knowledge more effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A student modelling approach was applied to design the personalization of learning content in the educational maze game and each of them contained mini-games. To evaluate the student’s preferences about the types of mini-games and ways of their personalization depending on individual and group student characteristics, the authors conducted an online survey.

Findings

This study presents examples of personalization of four types of mini-games available in maze halls, namely, question, searching, arranging and action games. Next, the research discusses findings from an online survey aiming at the evaluation of the preferred types of mini-games and the way of their personalization. There are analysed results concerning the impact of the student model characteristics on the preferred ways of personalization in educational maze games, together with criteria for personalization of educational resources according to student’s level of knowledge, age, goals and learning style.

Research limitations/implications

A significant limitation of the research is the relatively small number of survey participants and the lack of studying the impact of learning and playing styles over game personalization. Another limitation of the study is the inclusion of only some of the mini-games within the demonstration maze, which respondents play before answering the survey questions.

Originality/value

This paper presents original research on the personalization of educational maze game based on a model of the student profile that comprises both static and dynamic properties reflecting user, learner and player-related aspects of the student character, together with results obtained from an online survey.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Lúcia Pombo and Margarida Morais Marques

The purpose of this paper is to present a survey study that analyzes mobile learning through students’ opinion regarding the use of mobile devices for learning, including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a survey study that analyzes mobile learning through students’ opinion regarding the use of mobile devices for learning, including their advantages and difficulties, as well as the educational value of a specific mobile learning strategy, reified in the EduPARK game, after an experience of exploring it in formal and non-formal educational contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper comprises a survey study where mobile learning is analyzed through the eyes of 244 students attending the second or third cycles of basic education. The acknowledged advantages and difficulties of the use of mobile devices for learning, as well as the educational value and usability of a specific mobile learning strategy, using the EduPARK app and game, were analyzed.

Findings

Results revealed that most students owned a mobile device and were able to use them to learn. They had a positive perspective regarding mobile learning and valued the advantages of being easy to find up-to-date information, motivating for learning and easy to carry along. Difficulties are related to the use of mobile devices, such as requiring an internet connection, its slowness and prohibition of mobile devices in schools. The EduPARK game achieved an average educational value scale of 83.8 and an average system usability scale of 80.2, indicating its high educational value and usability for students.

Originality/value

This paper presents empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of the integration of mobile game-based augmented reality approaches in basic education to promote students’ learning. It also includes an example of excellent cross-subjects educational materials comprising a very useful tool for teachers and students to explore scientific knowledge by accessing appealing information on biological and historical references of a local urban park.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Adam Jerrett, Theo J.D. Bothma and Koos de Beer

Teaching students/library patrons twenty-first century literacies (such as information and library literacies) is important within a library setting. As such, finding an…

1010

Abstract

Purpose

Teaching students/library patrons twenty-first century literacies (such as information and library literacies) is important within a library setting. As such, finding an appropriate manner to teach these skills in a practical manner at tertiary level is important. As vehicles for constructivist learning, games provide a unique opportunity to teach these twenty-first century literacies in an engaging, practical, format. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation of an alternate reality game (ARG) to teach these literacies through gameplay.

Design/methodology/approach

An ARG was designed and developed where the core gameplay tasks taught and exercised twenty-first century literacies. The game, once completed, was then analysed as a case study to determine the effectiveness of the game-based approach to literacy learning.

Findings

Throughout the play of the game, players spent increasingly more time in the library, often using it as a common meeting point during play. Players reported that they learnt or exercised the skills that each game task focussed on, additionally noting that the game-based context made the process of learning and exercising these skills more enjoyable.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the creation of games, whether real world or digital, may be useful in engaging students/patrons with twenty-first century literacies as well as with their local library. The documentation of a successful ARG to teach twenty-first century literacies provides a model for future research to follow when designing engaging library-oriented games.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Jeffrey L. Lennon and David W. Coombs

The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an educational board game for increasing knowledge, positive attitudes‐beliefs, and self‐efficacy for dengue…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an educational board game for increasing knowledge, positive attitudes‐beliefs, and self‐efficacy for dengue prevention in a sample of Philippine school children and adolescents. Effective board games are more advantageous than lectures because they are adaptable, inexpensive and foster learning independently of teachers or lecturers. Also tested were relationships between perceived fun by students playing the game and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A school‐based pre‐test/post‐test experimentally controlled design was employed in a Filipino primary and secondary school population.

Findings

The lecture was more effective in increasing knowledge. But neither was more effective than the other in increasing positive attitudes‐beliefs and self‐efficacy. Both modes produced specifically significant increases in knowledge and self‐efficacy; only the lecture produced significant increases in attitudes‐beliefs. Also, there was a significant relationship between fun and self‐efficacy in the game group at the reduced regression model level but not in the presence of all study variables.

Research limitations/implications

No long term outcomes or behavioral change outcomes were measured. However, an educational game may increase knowledge and self‐efficacy about the dengue fever without the assistance of a teacher or other pre‐game instructional aids. In addition, the board game technique is flexible and easily adapted to other community or school health issues.

Originality/value

This was the first experimentally controlled study on the use of a game with the topic of dengue. The study on the use of a game was the first to demonstrate a significant increase in self‐efficacy as a result of the play of a board game. Original instruments measured self‐efficacy related to dengue control and also the variable of fun.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 19000