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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Kimberly K. Whitehead, Zach G. Zacharia and Edmund L. Prater

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the role of the source and recipient of knowledge in supply chain collaboration by providing evidence that the distributive…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the role of the source and recipient of knowledge in supply chain collaboration by providing evidence that the distributive capabilities of a source, working in conjunction with the absorptive capacity (AC) of a recipient, have direct and significant effects on levels of collaborative engagement between supply chain partners and indirect and significant effects on collaborative operational outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises 310 surveys and structural equations modelling to provide empirical evidence to support the significance of the source of knowledge in collaborative activities.

Findings

The study provides evidence for source-based knowledge transfer constructs (distributive capabilities) in supply chain collaboration. Further, this research supports these capabilities working in conjunction with recipient AC both as necessary but insufficient requirements for successful knowledge transfer.

Practical implications

Firm interdependence within supply chains continues to grow. In today’s environment of outsourcing and increasing levels of inter-firm activities, this research provides a parsimonious model of collaboration that allows firms to understand knowledge transfer better and how to more aptly manage these types of activities and complex relationships.

Originality/value

Earlier research in this domain has focussed on the abilities of a recipient firm to absorb knowledge in order to understand successful collaborative knowledge transfer. By solely focussing on the recipient firm, the role of the source of knowledge has been largely overlooked in this stream of research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Sherry L. Avery, Judy Y. Sun, Patricia M. Swafford and Edmund L. Prater

The purpose of this study is to promote Chinese indigenous research by examining a case in which adopting social capital (SC) scales developed in the Western context for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to promote Chinese indigenous research by examining a case in which adopting social capital (SC) scales developed in the Western context for Chinese samples can decontextualize inter-firm guanxi management in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the existing Western scales to measure SC, we collected data from Chinese executives participating in executive master of business administration programs on buyer–supplier relationship. Using the same items and data source, we identified post hoc factors representing guanxi dimensions. Ordinary least squared regressions were used for both guanxi and SC dimensions to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Our analysis showed that Chinese natives responded to the Western SC items according to their understanding and mindsets rooted in guanxi. This was evidenced by the results from the post hoc-derived guanxi dimensions with the same data, which show better regression results for the hypotheses tested, although the construct validity was comparable. Adopting Western SC measurement scales deconceptualized the intricate Chinese context and inter-firm interactions.

Research limitations/implications

It is inappropriate to borrow Western-developed scales for Chinese HRM research due to intricate differences in contexts. Doing so may run the risk of ignoring the Chinese context regarding the mechanisms and processes of complex human interactions, although it may produce superficial results consistent with the Western literature. Developing indigenous measurement scales should be considered not only as a preference but also as a requirement for Chinese management research.

Originality/value

We empirically compared the difference between Western-developed measurement scales and a Chinese indigenous construct, as well as their impact on relationship management in relation to indigenous Chinese management research.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Alan R. Cannon, Pedro M. Reyes, Gregory V. Frazier and Edmund L. Prater

This paper aims to point to established theory bases from other disciplines that may be used to illustrate the benefits, complexities and risks accompanying the adoption…

4349

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to point to established theory bases from other disciplines that may be used to illustrate the benefits, complexities and risks accompanying the adoption of radio‐frequency identification (RFID) technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Three theory streams are explored with respect to RFID adoption at two levels: the level of the tagged unit; and the level of the adopting firm. Each theory stream is evaluated specifically with respect to RFID, and research questions are proposed.

Findings

A variety of theoretical disciplines bring to light tension between uncertainty that spurs RFID adoption and uncertainty that accompanies RFID adoption.

Practical implications

Insights are provided for managers wrestling with: the question of whether and/or how to adopt RFID; or concerns regarding the implications of their decision to adopt RFID. In addition, the theory bases explored in this research offer guidance regarding risks that accompany RFID adoption but are not commonly considered.

Originality/value

For those contemplating adoption of, or research into, RFID technology, the paper offers a detailed synthesis of valuable theory streams, as well as promising research questions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Bin Jiang, Gregory V. Frazier and Edmund L. Prater

This research aims to empirically investigate the effect of outsourcing on firm level performance metrics, providing evidence about outsourcing influences on a firm's…

14176

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to empirically investigate the effect of outsourcing on firm level performance metrics, providing evidence about outsourcing influences on a firm's cost‐efficiency, productivity and profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is concerned with empirically examining the impact of outsourcing on a firm's performance. The results are based on a sample of 51 publicly traded firms that outsourced parts of their operations between 1990 and 2002. Publicly available accounting data are used to test for changes in operating performances that result from outsourcing decisions. Operating performances are examined over a four‐quarter period after the outsourcing announcement.

Findings

This research provides evidence that outsourcing can improve a firm's cost‐efficiency. While existing literature on outsourcing has also sought to draw anecdotal and conceptual evidence that highly visible companies have improved their productivity and profitability as well through outsourcing, the research reveals no evidence that outsourcing will improve a firm's productivity and profitability.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to what is available in public databases. Also, financial data pertain to the firm as a whole and not just to the outsourcing department or division, which would obscure the real outsourcing effects on the particular department or division.

Practical implications

This research makes two contributions to both practice and theory. First, this is the first empirical study to examine the link between outsourcing implementation and firm‐level performance metrics. Second, empirical evidence is provided of the difference between outsourcing firms' performance and their non‐outsourcing competitors'. Outsourcing firms have an obvious significant advantage in cost efficiency over their counterparts which do not outsource any activities at the same time. They also may obtain more available resources from outsourcing to invest in other productive capacities.

Originality/value

This research on outsourcing effects is the first to empirically test the relation between the outsourcing decision and the firm's productivity and profitability. Never before has outsourcing played such an important role in business, yet the overall impact of outsourcing on performance remains largely an unexplained puzzle. The research explores opportunities for further research to investigate the returns on outsourcing.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Nisha Paul Kulangara, Sherry Avery Jackson and Edmund Prater

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationship between trust, socialization, and information sharing on the buying firm’s innovation capability in the…

2186

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationship between trust, socialization, and information sharing on the buying firm’s innovation capability in the context of the buyer-supplier relationship (BSR). A nomological model is developed that examines the mediating role of relational capital (supplier trust) on the relationship between structural capital (socialization and information sharing) and innovation capability.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on 357 US executives. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Information sharing and formal socialization activities increased the buying firm’s trust in its key supplier. However, formal socialization activities within the context of the business environment did not have a significant direct impact on buyer’s innovative capabilities; but when mediated by trust, it positively impacted innovation capabilities. Informal socialization within the context of the social environment directly impacted innovation capabilities but trust did not mediate the relationship. Information sharing impacted trust and innovation significantly and trust mediated the impact of information sharing on innovation capabilities.

Originality/value

This study defines the formal and informal aspects of socialization and investigates its impact on trust and buyer innovation capabilities. This is one of the few studies that highlights the mediating role of trust between firms to facilitate innovation capability.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Kimberly Whitehead, Zach Zacharia and Edmund Prater

Despite the large literature base associated with dyadic collaboration, its knowledge-based antecedents are still not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the large literature base associated with dyadic collaboration, its knowledge-based antecedents are still not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to better understand those antecedents and to explore why the supply chain (SC) literature has found mixed results regarding knowledge transfer and absorptive capacity in dyadic collaboration research.

Design/methodology/approach

The critical incident technique (CIT) was utilized, using qualitative semi-structured interviews to refine a proposed research model. In total, 43 executives were interviewed each providing a description of both a successful and an unsuccessful SC dyadic collaboration. The interviews were analyzed to better understand the knowledge-based antecedents of buyer–supplier collaboration.

Findings

This study suggests that dyadic collaboration and subsequent outcomes are improved by successful knowledge transfer. Additionally, knowledge transfer requires both distributive and absorptive capacities in each participant. The research also uncovered new evidence to support the need for a collaborative orientation to support successful knowledge transfer.

Research limitations/implications

The interviews conducted using the CIT provided a wealth of information and executive experiences in SC collaboration. However, the interviews only provide a single perspective of collaborative engagements. Multiple perspectives of each collaboration would add value to this research.

Originality/value

SC collaboration and knowledge transfer have been well studied across disciplines. This research introduces new knowledge-related variables that can contribute to successful collaboration: distributive capability and SC collaborative orientation.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Susanna Khavul, Edmund Prater and Patricia M. Swafford

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, “How do international new ventures (INVs) from emerging economies become responsive to the demands of their…

1417

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, “How do international new ventures (INVs) from emerging economies become responsive to the demands of their international customers?”

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a model of international responsiveness that incorporates founding team experience, international firm experience, international strategic orientation, and investment in international supply chain and test the model using data from 293 INVs from three leading emerging economies: China, India, and South Africa.

Findings

Results show that for INVs from emerging economies international strategic orientation mediates the relationship between international firm experience, investment in international supply chain, and international responsiveness. In addition, the authors identify a significant difference in the effects of international strategic orientation on international responsiveness among subgroups of INVs.

Practical implications

Given the specific context of the sample, this study provides unique managerial insights for entrepreneurs planning to internationalize their new ventures from emerging economies.

Originality/value

The paper adds originality and value by extending research on international responsiveness, bridging two disciplines, and using a unique international, multi‐country sample.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Edmund Prater

Today, global supply chains must deal with large amounts of uncertainty. This paper seeks to provide a framework for understanding the different types of uncertainties…

3565

Abstract

Purpose

Today, global supply chains must deal with large amounts of uncertainty. This paper seeks to provide a framework for understanding the different types of uncertainties that can impact supply chains and their attendant information systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Addresses the following questions. What are the different types of uncertainty at the general macro level? How are these macro level uncertainty types broken down into more specific types of uncertainty seen in supply chains? What impact do these uncertainties have on the supply chain and the supporting IS, and what are the current methods for dealing with them?

Findings

The term uncertainty is used as a generic reference for various and sundry different types of problems within the management of supply chains and their supporting information systems (IS). This can lead to confusion about what tools and techniques are available and which tools apply to which types of problems. The framework presented allows researchers and practitioners to more accurately converse about the exact problems encountered in the management of supply chains and the tools that are needed to address these problems.

Originality/value

The paper addresses uncertainty in supply chains and provides a starting‐point for further discussion and research on the management of uncertainty within them.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Bin Jiang and Edmund Prater

Prior to the economic reform movement, China’s centrally planned, three‐tier system dominated the distribution sector. After the 1980s, this system gradually shifted away…

14365

Abstract

Prior to the economic reform movement, China’s centrally planned, three‐tier system dominated the distribution sector. After the 1980s, this system gradually shifted away from the socialist mode to the free market mode. Today, China’s distribution system lies somewhere between these two modes. Since the reform, China’s government has been encouraging export‐oriented foreign firms’ investments in free trade zones along the coast. Foreign firms do not enjoy the same inland distribution and logistics rights as their Chinese counterparts. However, the distribution puzzle is not only faced by foreign firms, but also by Chinese firms that operate nationwide. China’s undeveloped infrastructure, government regulations, and regional protectionism fragment distribution channels throughout China. However, there are three main forces that are changing and modernizing China’s distribution and logistics system. These are the booming economy, entering the WTO and e‐commerce. The inevitable revolution of China’s distribution and logistics system is on the way.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Edmund Prater, Gregory V. Frazier and Pedro M. Reyes

To place the research on radio frequency identification (RFID) usage in supply chains within a specific business and market context; in this case, the grocery industry.

15189

Abstract

Purpose

To place the research on radio frequency identification (RFID) usage in supply chains within a specific business and market context; in this case, the grocery industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers RFID research within the context of the grocery industry and outlines the market drivers that affect the way the grocery industry approaches RFID and also specific areas of research on RFID that should be undertaken to better provide the grocery industry with managerial insights into this technology's application.

Findings

Examining market drivers that are leading to RFID implementation in the grocery industry, this paper provides a theoretical framework for future applied research on RFID implementation. Specifically, it develops a research framework that includes research using modeling techniques, RFID implementation and the impact of RFID on daily operational issues.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the market drivers for RFID implementation. While it does address other areas that are related to research in this field, it is limited in its ability to go into detailed discussion of those areas. For example, while technology implementation and innovation diffusion issues are raised, they are detailed research domains of their own which can only be superficially addressed in the context of this paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides a detailed framework of research areas that are of direct, practical importance to the grocery industry. This should encourage research into this area, for, as researchers provide insights into these issues, the grocery industry can immediately put the findings into practice.

Originality/value

RFID has garnered a great deal of research interest. However, that research has primarily focused on RFID's impact on general supply chain issues, failing to place the discussion within a specific business domain. This is necessary because the strategic environment of any business impacts on the applicability of any technology.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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