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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Edmund Goh and Tom Baum

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a growing emergence of “quarantine hotels” that provide accommodation to guests who are mandated to self-isolate for 14 days upon entry to a…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a growing emergence of “quarantine hotels” that provide accommodation to guests who are mandated to self-isolate for 14 days upon entry to a country to prevent the spread of virus. Why are young hotel workers willing to endure relatively poor working conditions and expose themselves to dangerous COVID-19 workplace environments? Perhaps, the opportunity to participate in meaningful work is the prime motivator for hotel workers who choose to work in quarantine hotels. This study aims to investigate the motivations that young hotel employees hold towards working in a potentially dangerous hotel workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Using personal interviews, this research explored the antecedents behind Generation Z employees’ (n = 42) actual behaviour towards working in quarantine hotels through the lens of the extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived difficulties and meaningful work).

Findings

Results revealed that meaningful work such as making the world safer and going beyond the call of duty was a key motivating factor behind a willingness to work in quarantine hotels. Hotel employees also viewed working in quarantine hotels as exciting but dangerous, and the support from their family nuclei was seen as a key underlying motivator.

Practical implications

The key implications are the image of the hospitality industry in terms of professional identity to be an industry that is respected by society given the high-risk work environment with increased exposure to COVID-19. Even though Generation Z still see some long-standing negatives in hotel work such as long hours and emotional challenge, it is positive to know that there are contexts in which they can have more pride and meaningfulness from their jobs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to examine Generation Z hotel workers’ motivations to work in quarantine hotels. A key theoretical contribution to the body of knowledge is the extension of the TPB framework with the additional meaningful work variable.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Claire Lambert and Edmund Goh

This industry viewpoint paper provides a comprehensive overview and critical viewpoint on the use of collectable toy premiums via instant reward programs (IRP) within the…

Abstract

Purpose

This industry viewpoint paper provides a comprehensive overview and critical viewpoint on the use of collectable toy premiums via instant reward programs (IRP) within the retail industry as a marketing tool.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon the uses of a “free” collectable toy premium promotion with a fixed purchase spend (via an IRP) in the supermarket industry as a marketing instrument to increase customer basket spend and repeat visits. Reflections on the recent use of toy premiums by Australian supermarket retailers are also utilised to highlight the ingredients for a successful promotion but also the controversies associated with such promotions.

Findings

One of the key findings suggest that the role of toy premiums is a successful marketing tool by retailers to increase customer total basket spending. However, notable points of caution regarding offering IRPs incorporating collectable toy premiums promotions are established, including environmental concerns and the social, ethical dilemma as to whether these promotions are indirectly targeted at children rather than adult consumers.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for retailers to attract customer attention, increased market spend and repeat purchases through a desired collectable premium promotion (via an IRP).

Originality/value

This is the first paper to critically review the usage of collectable toy premiums within the supermarket retail industry.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Joshua Aston, Jun Wen, Edmund Goh and Oswin Maurer

This cutting-edge short commentary is intended to raise awareness of sex trafficking in the tourism and hospitality industry. The purpose of this paper is to also advocate…

Abstract

Purpose

This cutting-edge short commentary is intended to raise awareness of sex trafficking in the tourism and hospitality industry. The purpose of this paper is to also advocate for further research to identify and hopefully prevent sex trafficking in related settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a descriptive overview of the current knowledge base on sex trafficking in tourism and hospitality. Based on gaps in the literature, future research agendas and directions are suggested.

Findings

Academic research on sex trafficking in tourism and hospitality remains limited. More scholarly attention is needed to this matter. The tourism industry is directly and indirectly associated with sex trafficking (e.g. hotel accommodations and direct consumption of sexual services, such as through sex tourism). Despite legislative efforts by international government agencies to eradicate sex trafficking, the problem remains pervasive. Broader practice- and research-based intervention efforts are needed.

Originality/value

This short commentary advocates for tourism and hospitality researchers to make practical and theoretical industry contributions that may help prevent sex trafficking.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Edmund Goh, Saiyidi Mat Roni and Deepa Bannigidadmath

Financial bankruptcy is inevitable in the tourism and hospitality ecosystem. Despite the pertinence of tourism and hospitality businesses going into bankruptcy, limited…

Abstract

Purpose

Financial bankruptcy is inevitable in the tourism and hospitality ecosystem. Despite the pertinence of tourism and hospitality businesses going into bankruptcy, limited studies have investigated the early warning signs and likelihood of a financial bankruptcy occurring in tourism and hospitality firms. This study examined the predictive value of financial ratios as potential indicators in predicting bankruptcy among tourism and hospitality firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Altman's z-score bankruptcy prediction model was applied through five key financial ratios to predict bankruptcy of the Thomas Cook Travel Group over a ten year period (2008–2018).

Findings

The key findings of this study strongly suggest that besides the size and location of the firm, financial ratios are reliable predictors and play a pivotal role in predicting the bankruptcy of a tourism and hospitality business.

Practical implications

The paper provides key stakeholders to adopt checks and balances to identify financial distressed tourism firms through financial ratios.

Originality/value

This is the first academic paper to inspect the financial history of Thomas Cook Travel Group in a financial ratio context, particularly following the bankruptcy of the firm in 2019.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Edmund Goh, Sandy Nguyen and Rob Law

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of 46 hotel management students from four leading private hotel management schools (PHMS) in Australia on their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of 46 hotel management students from four leading private hotel management schools (PHMS) in Australia on their decision in choosing a PHMS over a traditional public university.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing the theory of planned behaviour as a theoretical framework, the qualitative interview data identified ten key attitudes, four reference groups and four perceived difficulties as potential motivators of students deciding to enrol in PHMS.

Findings

This paper identified reputation of school and industry placement opportunities as key attitudinal items shaping students’ decision-making process. With regards to important social groups, education agents and family were key reference groups. In relation to perceived difficulties, students reported tuition and living costs, and far distance from home as key barriers in their decision to study at PHMS.

Research limitations/implications

The sample draws upon students from a single state, New South Wales, Australia and this limits the generalisability of the authors’ findings. This study also excluded students from Australian public universities who may hold different perceptions towards studying at a PHMS.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for hotel schools to improve their curriculum designs and embed practical hands on the learning experience of their students. Marketing agencies can also use these motivational attributes in developing effective marketing campaigns to increase enrolment figures.

Originality/value

This framework has proven to be useful in helping marketers understand various underlying motivational factors to attract prospective students to enrol in private hotel management schools.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Richard N.S. Robinson, Anna Kralj, David J. Solnet, Edmund Goh and Victor J. Callan

The purpose of this study is to identify across a number of workplace variables the similarities and differences in attitudes between three key frontline hotel worker…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify across a number of workplace variables the similarities and differences in attitudes between three key frontline hotel worker groups: housekeepers, front office employees and food and beverage front-of-house staff.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted using 25 semi-structured interviews with frontline workers employed in full-service hotels across Eastern Australia. Analysis was augmented through the Leximancer® software package to develop relational themes in the aggregation and disaggregation of the occupations.

Findings

Although work/life balance was a common theme across the three occupations, several distinct attitudinal differences emerged, in particular regarding perceptions of one occupational group towards another.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of hotel managers being cognisant of occupational differences and collecting data capable of assisting in the identification of these differences. Several practitioner relevant recommendations are made.

Originality/value

This exploratory study challenges assumptions regarding a “pan-industrial” hospitality occupational community and applies an emerging qualitative software package to highlight occupational differences and relational perceptions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Jun Wen, Carol Chunfeng Wang, Edmund Goh, Zhaohui Su and Tianyu Ying

This paper explores the role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a tourism recovery drawcard to boost China's inbound tourism after COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a tourism recovery drawcard to boost China's inbound tourism after COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employed a mixed method involving a cross-disciplinary literature review along with reflections from experts in TCM and health communication to inform tourism management. Specifically, this paper examines TCM and its potential benefits as a medical tourism drawcard to combat COVID-19. The selected literature focusses on the image and merits of TCM to frame how this medical philosophy can be used to position China as a tourist destination. Reflections on the use of TCM as a tourism marketing tool can guide promotional strategies from the Chinese government and destination managers during and after COVID-19.

Findings

The Chinese government, the tourism industry (e.g. destination managers), the media and tourists must focus on three aspects of the role of TCM: to provide medical benefits to travellers amid COVID-19 and beyond, elevate China as a destination for global medical tourists and be leveraged as a tool for economic recovery.

Practical implications

The paper builds a tourism recovery framework for stakeholders to adopt tailored TCM communication strategies to boost its inbound tourism programme.

Originality/value

This paper is the first academic paper to review TCM comprehensively and critically in relation to China tourism and post-COVID-19 recovery measures.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Mehmet Ali Koseoglu

This study aims to address how the social structure of the hospitality management field has evolved from 1960 to 2016.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address how the social structure of the hospitality management field has evolved from 1960 to 2016.

Design/methodology/approach

The informal social structure of the hospitality management literature was analyzed by collecting authorship data from seven hospitality management journals. Co-authorship analyses via network analysis were conducted.

Findings

According to the findings, throughout the history of hospitality management, international collaboration levels are relatively low. Based on social network analysis, the research community is only loosely connected, and the network of the community does not fit with the small-world network theory. Additional findings indicate that researchers in the hospitality management literature are ranked via degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality. Cliques, which contain at least five researchers, and core researchers are identified.

Practical implications

This study helps both scholars and practitioners improve the informal structure of the field. Scholars must generate strong ties to strengthen cross-fertilization in the field; hence, they collaborate with authors who have strong positions in the field. Specifically, this provides a useful performance analysis. To the extent that institutions and individuals are rewarded for publications, this study demonstrates the performance and connectivity of several key researchers in the field. This finding could be interesting to (post)graduate students. Hospitality managers looking for advisors and consultants could benefit from the findings. Additionally, these are beneficial for journal editors, junior researchers and agencies/institutions.

Originality/value

As one of the first study in the field, this research examines the informal social structure of hospitality management literature in seven journals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Ting Zhang, Ting Qu, George Q. Huang, Xin Chen and Zongzhong Wang

Commonly shared logistics services help manufacturing companies to cut down redundant logistics investments while enhance the overall service quality. Such service-sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

Commonly shared logistics services help manufacturing companies to cut down redundant logistics investments while enhance the overall service quality. Such service-sharing mode has been naturally adopted by group companies to form the so-called headquarter-managed centralized distribution center (HQ-CDC). The HQ-CDC manages the common inventories for the group’s subsidiaries and provides shared storage services to the subsidiaries through appropriate sizing, pricing and common replenishment. Apart from seeking a global optimal solution for the whole group, the purpose of this paper is to investigate balanced solutions between the HQ-CDC and the subsidiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

Two decision models are formulated. Integrated model where the group company makes all-in-one decision to determine the space allocation, price setting and the material replenishment on behalf of HQ-CDC and subsidiaries. Bilevel programming model where HQ-CDC and subsidiaries make decisions sequentially to draw a balance between their local objectives. From the perspective of result analysis, the integrated model will develop a managerial benchmark which minimizes the group company’s total cost, while the bilevel programming model could be used to measure the interactive effects between local objectives as well as their final effect on the total objective.

Findings

Through comparing the numerical results of the two models, two major findings are obtained. First, the HQ-CDC’s profit is noticeably improved in the bilevel programming model as compared to the integrated model. However, the improvement of HQ-CDC’s profit triggers the cost increasing of subsidiaries. Second, the analyses of different sizing and pricing policies reveal that the implementation of the leased space leads to a more flexible space utilization in the HQ-CDC and the reduced group company’s total cost especially in face of large demand and high demand fluctuation.

Research limitations/implications

Several classical game-based decision models are to be introduced to examine the more complex relationships between the HQ-CDC and the subsidiaries, such as Nash Game model or Stackelberg Game model, and more complete and meaningful managerial implications may be found through result comparison with the integrated model. The analytical solutions may be developed to achieve more accurate results, but the mathematical models may have to be with easier structure or tighter assumptions.

Practical implications

The group company should take a comprehensive consideration on both cost and profit before choosing the decision framework and the coordination strategy. HQ-CDC prefers a more flexible space usage strategy to avoid idle space and to increase the space utilization. The subsidiaries with high demand uncertainties should burden a part of cost to induce the subsidiaries with steady demands to coordinate. Tanshipments should be encouraged in HQ-CDC to reduce the aggregate inventory level as well as to maintain the customer service level.

Social implications

The proposed decision frameworks and warehousing policies provide guidance for the managers in group companies to choose the proper policy and for the subsidiaries to better coordinate.

Originality/value

This research studies the services sharing on the warehouse sizing, pricing and common replenishment in a HQ-CDC. The interactive decisions between the HQ-CDC and the subsidiaries are formulated in a bilevel programming model and then analyzed under various practical scenarios.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Patrick Kim Cheng Low

To show and analyse the concept, practice, problems and prospects of father leadership in Singapore. The study also proposes such practices in Asian countries.

Abstract

Purpose

To show and analyse the concept, practice, problems and prospects of father leadership in Singapore. The study also proposes such practices in Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus group participants, were mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, and did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy.

Findings

The Singapore Government leads the way and father leadership is widely practiced. An analysis is also made of the management approach, problems and prospects of father leadership as practised in Singapore with its practices proposed in other Asian countries.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include time and costs constraints; otherwise more focus group sessions can be held and the focus group participants, mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy. It is argued that a synonymous match exists between the national culture and business culture in Singapore; hence the selection of the business people in the focus group. That synonymous match is primarily because of the country's small size and lack of natural resources, and because since its birth as a modern nation, Singapore is dependent on human capital and relies strongly on its economy for its survival and growth.

Practical implications

The study provides useful lessons for businesses and political analysts outside Singapore to better understand the Government's paternalistic instincts in ensuring the long‐term sustainability of Singapore's economy and her citizenry.

Originality/value

The article provides a continuing perspective on governance and management in Singapore. It also extends existing studies into Confucianistic societies/ societies that are perceived by the outside world as being autocratic.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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