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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Ranjit S. Dighe

The editorials of the then-new Business Week during the 1929–1933 contraction offered sophisticated Keynesian policy prescriptions: against a laissez-faire response…

Abstract

The editorials of the then-new Business Week during the 1929–1933 contraction offered sophisticated Keynesian policy prescriptions: against a laissez-faire response, against deflation, against balanced-budget fetishism, for monetary expansion. These editorials, which seem to have been largely forgotten, likely played a considerable role in the dissemination of Keynesian economics in the United States in the 1930s. This chapter reviews the editorials and their congruence with Keynes’s writings. The magazine’s archives, including surveys of their readers, suggest that the editorials were among the most read and most valued parts of the magazine. The magazine cultivated an elite executive readership at that time, so the editorials may well have been important in gaining business support for Keynesian policies in the early New Deal.

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Oliver Stead and Chern Li Liew

The difficulty of attributing subject to editorial cartoons for indexing purposes exists both for traditional paper-based cartoon formats and for digitized or born-digital…

Abstract

Purpose

The difficulty of attributing subject to editorial cartoons for indexing purposes exists both for traditional paper-based cartoon formats and for digitized or born-digital cartoons. This paper presents a selective review of literature on indexing editorial cartoons and the associated challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A gap exists in published research on indexing collections of editorial cartoons for online search and retrieval. This paper presents a review of selected works that specifically address the topic of editorial cartoon indexing within a wider context of research that addresses image indexing, subject analysis and indexing challenges more generally. Works that address the interpretation of cartoons by readers and how readers respond to information communicated by editorial cartoons are also considered.

Findings

Cartoon controversies in transnational and multicultural contexts, experienced through the international news media since 2000, have dramatically increased research attention and publications in this area. Profound changes in media publication since the advent of the Internet have had an impact on editorial cartoonists and cartoon publishing. Subject indexing of editorial cartoons remains a challenge.

Research limitations/implications

The potential for large indexed cartoon collections to be data-mined for topic modeling for research in the social sciences points to the need for indexers of cartoon collections to improve metadata standards and structures to allow improved access to cartoon metadata for computational analysis.

Originality/value

This paper places discussion of the technical challenges facing indexers of editorial cartoons within a broader context of discussions about the nature and future of editorial cartooning in rapidly changing media and publishing environments.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Ralph W. Adler and Gregory Liyanarachchi

The purpose of this paper is to report successful authors’ views about the editorial review processes of a set of 42 accounting journals. The two main objectives are: to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report successful authors’ views about the editorial review processes of a set of 42 accounting journals. The two main objectives are: to enlighten editors and journal publishers in their quest to improve their journals’ editorial review processes and to inform prospective authors about the past experiences successful authors have had with the 42 accounting journals.

Design/methodology/approach

A Webmail survey was used to collect data about authors’ experiences with publishing in one of the 42 accounting journals. A total of 856 responses (40 per cent response rate) was received. Various statistical analyses were used to explore a range of editorial review process features, including the timeliness of editorial feedback, timeliness of publishing accepted manuscripts, quality of the feedback provided and performance of the editor.

Findings

Authors were found to be generally quite satisfied with the editorial review processes of the journals in which they published. There were, however, notable leaders and laggards observed among the 42 journal titles. The survey findings also revealed that many journals use the practice of basing their editorial decisions on the comments of a single reviewer. In fact, this practice is most prevalent among the journals that are commonly perceived as the field’s “top” journals. These and other editorial review results – for example, comparisons between journal-tiers, geographical locations of editorial review offices and journal specialties – are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper extends and moves well beyond Adler and Liyanarachchi (2011), by exploring such additional author perceptions of the editorial review process as the performance of journal editors, the use of multiple reviewers and reviewers’ reporting of the typical faults/weaknesses in the papers they read. Exposing to public scrutiny an academic discipline’s editorial review processes is quite common in some fields of research, most notably medicine. Doing so in the accounting discipline addresses a need that many of the respondents felt was highly necessary and long overdue. While authors will benefit from the paper’s insights, editors and publishers are expected to as well.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Isabel Metz and Anne‐Wil Harzing

This study aims to update knowledge of women's representation on the boards of scholarly management journals with a longitudinal analysis of the same over two decades.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to update knowledge of women's representation on the boards of scholarly management journals with a longitudinal analysis of the same over two decades.

Design/methodology/approach

This study extends the work of Metz and Harzing on women's representation in the editorial boards of 57 management journals from 1989 to 2004 by focusing on the development of gender diversity in editorial board membership over time. The authors first add another time period (2005‐2009) to Metz and Harzing's data. They then add empirical richness by conducting a more fine‐grained analysis of women's representation at the various editorial board levels over time. In addition, this study analyses the development of female editorial board memberships over time for five management fields, journals of four different ranks, and two geographic regions. As a result, this study examines women's representation in the editorial boards of 57 management journals over a period of 20 years (from 1989 to 2009).

Findings

The results showed an overall increase in women's representation in the editorial boards of these 57 management journals (at Board Member, Associate Editor and Editor in Chief levels) in the last five years (2004‐2009) to 22.4 per cent. Despite several positive trends identified in this follow‐up study, women's representation as editorial board members continues to be inconsistent across five management fields, across four journal rankings and across two geographic regions.

Practical implications

This study's findings clearly indicate that there is still much that can be done to narrow the gender imbalance in most editorial boards of management journals. Monitoring women's representation in editorial boards of management journals is only one of the steps needed for successful change to occur.

Social implications

This study's findings matter for our society because editorial board membership is a sign of one's scholarly recognition and valued in academic promotion processes. It is important, therefore, that this promotion criterion be evaluated in the context of up‐to‐date knowledge of the representation of women in editorial boards of management journals, otherwise its impact on women's promotion could exacerbate an already discriminatory system of academic scholarship.

Originality/value

It is important to monitor women's (under)representation on the boards of scholarly management journals regularly to raise awareness that might lead to or sustain positive change. This follow‐up study serves that purpose in the field of management, a largely neglected field until recently.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Garry D. Carnegie and Christopher J. Napier

The purpose of this paper is to examine the origins and development of the “Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal (AAAJ) Community”, a flourishing international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the origins and development of the “Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal (AAAJ) Community”, a flourishing international interdisciplinary accounting research community. This scholarly community has emerged over some 30 years from the publication in 1988 of the inaugural issue of AAAJ under the joint editorship of James Guthrie and Lee Parker. This historical account discusses the motivation for establishing the journal and the important publishing initiatives, developments and trends across this period. The study positions the journal as a key thought leader, the catalyst for other Community activities such as the Asia-Pacific Interdisciplinary Research in Accounting conference.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation involved a selective review of the contents of AAAJ, particularly the annual editorials published since inception, and other relevant literature, analysis of the main research themes and the most cited papers, and oral history interviews with the joint editors. The future prospects for the AAAJ Community are addressed.

Findings

The AAAJ Community has shaped and led developments in interdisciplinary accounting research. Recognised for innovation and with a reputation for nurturing scholars, AAAJ continues to grow in stature as one of the world’s leading accounting journals, challenging the status quo and fostering inclusive scholarship.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not examine the journal’s publication patterns nor assess in detail the research studies that have been published in the journal.

Originality/value

The study recognises AAAJ as central to the development of an interdisciplinary accounting research community, firmly located in the sociological, critical and interpretative tradition also associated with some other leading accounting journals.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

James Guthrie and Lee D. Parker

This editorial reflects on 25 years of AAAJ and on the interdisciplinary accounting movement and its future direction. It emphasises the Editors' commitment to encouraging…

Abstract

Purpose

This editorial reflects on 25 years of AAAJ and on the interdisciplinary accounting movement and its future direction. It emphasises the Editors' commitment to encouraging the application of a broad range of theories and research methodologies as well as their ongoing support for diversity as a defining feature of AAAJ. This includes the wider community, which includes the APIRA conference attendees, Special Issue editors and the many individuals who have all played an important part in AAAJ's 25 years. The Editors continue to urge interdisciplinary accounting researchers to undertake innovative research and be both original and creative, thereby avoiding a narrowness that is an increasing feature of North American economics based accounting research. The important role of academic researchers is highlighted in not simply observing, but also engaging in and constructing an enabling accounting. The purpose here is to reflect on the past and to look towards the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a literature‐based analysis and critique. It also identifies via empirical data the field of scholarship associated with AAAJ and evidence of the patterning of recent publications.

Findings

This editorial draws together various themes in our previous AAAJ editorials and highlights milestones in the journey to our current position. It identifies various challenges that confront interdisciplinary researchers in the globalised academic community. It also points to the need for researchers to reflect on their motivation, informing theories and values to ensure that their academic endeavours are making a contribution to practice, policy and a wider societal good.

Practical implications

It is hoped the practical and research issues explored in this editorial will invoke more interdisciplinary perspectives on accounting and the accounting profession, and assist scholars in reflecting on their academic studies and potential challenges facing them.

Originality/value

This editorial reflects on the developments in AAAJ over the past 25 years and discusses various contributions. It also celebrates the top ten authors, topics, Special Issue editors, and the last ten AAAJ Best Paper awards.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Lee D. Parker

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and evaluate the roles of research journal editorial boards in fostering scholarship and nurturing new knowledge areas and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and evaluate the roles of research journal editorial boards in fostering scholarship and nurturing new knowledge areas and research approaches, typified by the growing qualitative methodological tradition, in the accounting and management disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

Editors and their boards are considered as trustees of both journals and their stocks of knowledge. Their profiles and multiple roles are elucidated and critiqued, and their scope of influence is delineated.

Findings

The paper reviewing function is revealed as complex and multifaceted, with reviewers falling into several categories of approach to their responsibilities. Supported by journal editors, editorial board members are portrayed as having both direct action and journal policy responsibilities, accepting such positions and roles for a variety of rationales. Their responsibility for fostering the emerging qualitative research tradition in accounting and management is explored and presented as a primary example of the editorial board's role in pushing the boundaries of the discipline.

Research limitations/implications

This paper offers a wider than hitherto articulated specification of the roles and contributions to disciplinary advancement potentially on offer from editors' and editorial board members' strategic approach to their roles.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first in the published accounting and management research journal literatures to focus on the roles and rationales relating to research journal editorial board membership as a foundation for the academy's knowledge construction.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Tony Brinn and Michael John Jones

The purpose of this research is to examine the composition of the editorial boards of 60 academic accounting journals with a particular focus on the university…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the composition of the editorial boards of 60 academic accounting journals with a particular focus on the university affiliations of editorial board members. The role of ad hoc reviewers is then analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed content analysis of the members of the 60 editorial boards was conducted. The authors concentrated on UK universities and journals, but also provide some data on non‐UK schools and journals.

Findings

There were six main findings. First, editorial appointments were normally held by nationals of the country where the journal was published. Second, US academics had a significant presence on all boards. Third, there was a lack of penetration of UK academics, particularly on US or high quality boards. Fourth, overseas academics were present in significant numbers on UK boards. Fifth, editorial board appointments tended to be concentrated in a limited number of institutions and individuals. Sixth, journals, particularly generalist journals, used reviewers extensively.

Practical implications

This research will inform the debate about the degree of influence which UK academics have on journal research agendas and on the international stage. The findings show that journal editorial boards do not capture all high ranking institutions and individuals. Editors could consider widening the scope of their editorial board opportunities.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive study into the editorial boards of accounting journals. It shows the presence of an editorial board elite.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journalism and Austerity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-417-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Enrique Ogliastri, Carlos Pombo and Elvira Salgado

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the anniversary issue marking 30 years of academic publication.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the anniversary issue marking 30 years of academic publication.

Design/methodology/approach

This anniversary issue contains 12 articles from 11 countries and 17 academic institutions which present literature reviews, meta-analyses, and novel studies. It also contains testimonials about the history of the journal from Enrique Ogliastri (Editor and/or Director between 1998 and 2018), Elvira Salgado (Editor between 2002 and 2013), and Carlos Pombo (Chief Editor, 2013 to the present).

Findings

The history of the journal may be divided into five stages: first, the foundation at the Universidad de Chile (1988-1998); second, the move to the Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá) and the preparation of a proposal to the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for inclusion among the scientific journals of the world (1999-2004); third, a period of consolidation in Latin America (2004-2007); fourth, the acceptance of the journal in ISI and the development of an electronic platform with free access to the journal (2008-2013); and fifth, the entry of the Emerald group as editorial partner (2013-2018).

Originality/value

The 12 articles present literature reviews, meta-analyzes, and novel studies.

Propósito

El propósito de este editorial es presentar el tema del aniversario.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Se publican doce artículos provenientes de once países y 17 instituciones académicas. Se presentan los testimonios de Enrique Ogliastri (editor y/o director entre 1998 y 2018), Elvira Salgado (Editora entre 2002 y 2013), y Carlos Pombo (jefe editorial 2013-2018).

Hallazgos

Se publican doce artículos provenientes de once países y 17 instituciones académicas. Se presentan los testimonios de Enrique Ogliastri (editor y/o director entre 1998 y 2018), Elvira Salgado (Editora entre 2002 y 2013), y Carlos Pombo (jefe editorial 2013-2018). La historia de la revista de CLADEA se podría dividir en cinco etapas: la fundación en la Universidad de Chile (1988-1998); pasó a cargo de la Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá), un período de puesta a punto para presentar al Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) la solicitud de ser analizada e incluida entre las revistas científicas del mundo (1999-2004); el período de consolidación en América Latina (2004-2007); la aceptación en ISI y el desarrollo de una plataforma electrónica de acceso libre a la revista (2008-2013); y el ingreso del grupo Emerald como socio editorial (2013-2018).

Originalidad/valor

Los 12 artículos presentan revisiones de literatura, metanálisis y estudios novedosos

1 – 10 of over 35000