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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Jennifer Creese, John-Paul Byrne, Anne Matthews, Aoife M. McDermott, Edel Conway and Niamh Humphries

Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes…

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1634

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes and safety and human resources in healthcare organisations. This study aims to examine factors that influence workplace silence among hospital doctors in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A national, cross-sectional, online survey of hospital doctors in Ireland was conducted in October–November 2019; 1,070 hospital doctors responded. This paper focuses on responses to the question “If you had concerns about your working conditions, would you raise them?”. In total, 227 hospital doctor respondents (25%) stated that they would not raise concerns about their working conditions. Qualitative thematic analysis was carried out on free-text responses to explore why these doctors choose to opt for silence regarding their working conditions.

Findings

Reputational risk, lack of energy and time, a perceived inability to effect change and cultural norms all discourage doctors from raising concerns about working conditions. Apathy arose as change to working conditions was perceived as highly unlikely. In turn, this had scope to lead to neglect and exit. Voice was seen as risky for some respondents, who feared that complaining could damage their career prospects and workplace relationships.

Originality/value

This study highlights the systemic, cultural and practical issues that pressure hospital doctors in Ireland to opt for silence around working conditions. It adds to the literature on workplace silence and voice within the medical profession and provides a framework for comparative analysis of doctors' silence and voice in other settings.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Edel Conway and Kathy Monks

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of organisational restructuring on the devolution of HRM to middle managers in the Irish health service.

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2779

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of organisational restructuring on the devolution of HRM to middle managers in the Irish health service.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved interviews with a cross‐section of 48 HR and line managers in one area of the Irish health service.

Findings

Decision making by both HR and middle managers was adversely affected by the increased layers of bureaucracy that had resulted from the restructuring process. HR managers were devolving HR activities but were still retaining control of information systems and this was both slowing down middle management decision making and leading to the creation of new databases by the managers themselves. HR managers were emerging as regulators of HR activities.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one area of the Irish health service and with a limited number of respondents.

Originality/value

The study examines the way in which organisational context impacts on the devolution of HR activities to line managers and adds to an understanding of the relationship between HR and middle managers in the devolution of HR activities to line managers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Edel Conway

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401

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Ashley O’Donoghue, Edel Conway and Janine Bosak

This chapter investigates the relationship between abusive supervision and employee well-being (i.e., job satisfaction, engagement) and ill-being (i.e., burnout…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter investigates the relationship between abusive supervision and employee well-being (i.e., job satisfaction, engagement) and ill-being (i.e., burnout, workaholism) and examines whether follower core self-evaluations (CSE) moderate this relationship.

Methodology/approach

The study uses cross-sectional survey data collected from 111 professional employees across a range of industry sectors.

Findings

Results show that abusive supervision is negatively related to employee well-being (i.e., engagement and job satisfaction) and positively related to employee ill-being, namely burnout. In addition, employees low in CSE are less engaged and less satisfied than employees high in CSE.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s cross-sectional design limits the strength of its conclusions.

Practical implications

This chapter notes the ethical and legal obligations of organizations to provide a safe working environment and identifies the policies and procedures that will signal a commitment to employee well-being.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the leadership and well-being literatures by exploring the influence of abusive leaders on follower well-being and engagement. It also goes beyond merely identifying correlations between leadership style and follower well-being outcomes to investigate how leader and follower attributes can combine to influence these outcomes.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Gráinne Kelly, Michele Mastroeni, Edel Conway, Kathy Monks, Katie Truss, Patrick Flood and Enda Hannon

The aim of this paper is to contribute to understanding the nature of specialist and generalist human capital by exploring the ways in which knowledge workers view their…

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2600

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to contribute to understanding the nature of specialist and generalist human capital by exploring the ways in which knowledge workers view their experience of working in specialist and generalist roles in pharmaceutical firms in Ireland and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based on interviews with 55 knowledge workers employed in a range of scientific, technical and managerial positions in four Irish and two UK firms located in the pharmaceutical sector. Interviews were also conducted with nine human resource/training and development managers within these six firms.

Findings

The findings suggest that the categorisation of human capital as either specialist or generalist is too rigid and does not take account of the fact that individuals may themselves choose to shape their careers by investing in a range of education, training and development opportunities that will enable them to move between specialist and generalist roles.

Originality/value

The paper unpacks the concepts of specialist and generalist human capital from an employee perspective and challenges the sharp distinction that is made between specialist and generalist human capital.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Ciara Nolan, Edel Conway, Tara Farrell and Kathy Monks

The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel industry employers' expectations of, and satisfaction with, graduate competencies in comparison with graduate perceptions…

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3259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel industry employers' expectations of, and satisfaction with, graduate competencies in comparison with graduate perceptions of what is required for their roles and their satisfaction with how well their education experience prepared them.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a questionnaire survey of 41 employers and 33 graduates in the Irish hotel sector, supplemented by a series of interviews. This sector was chosen because it represents the main destination of graduates who specialise in hospitality and tourism management.

Findings

The competencies consistently regarded as important across both samples related to interpersonal and professional knowledge skill domains. However, a number of gaps were evident with regard to satisfaction with how the education experience prepared graduates for careers in the industry.

Research limitations/implications

The study was confined to graduate and employer views on hospitality and tourism management education in Ireland. Its findings would benefit from a future comparative analysis including generic business graduates, as well as support from different national contexts.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the need for greater collaboration and partnership between the industry and education providers in preparing students to meet the needs of the hotel industry. In particular, the focus of the curriculum and the pedagogical approaches used need to be reviewed to ensure closer alignment.

Originality/value

The research focuses not only on the critical competencies needed by hotel managers but also on the level of satisfaction experienced by both graduate and employer samples.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Downloads
405

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Abstract

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Adelina Broadbridge and Sharon Anne Mavin

Downloads
2742

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Abstract

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

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