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Article

Eddie Greenwood

The transforming influence of care in the community, with its resulting mass of new legislation, has brought about change whose pace has been gathering momentum. The…

Abstract

The transforming influence of care in the community, with its resulting mass of new legislation, has brought about change whose pace has been gathering momentum. The culmination of this process is evident in the Modernising Mental Health Services (Department of Health, 1999a) agenda, proposals to reform the Mental Health Act (Department of Health 1999b, 1999c, 1999d) and the Mental Health National Service Framework (Department of Health, 1999e). This article explores the challenges.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article

Bryan T. Sinclair

An overview of the various selection tools currently available for building a better jazz recording collection on compact disc. Evaluative guides, select discographies…

Abstract

An overview of the various selection tools currently available for building a better jazz recording collection on compact disc. Evaluative guides, select discographies, general reference works, reviews in periodicals, and World Wide Web sites are suggested to aid in this process. Together, these resources can aid librarians and media selectors in building well‐rounded collections that cover different styles and movements of jazz over the last century, from the latest reissues of albums of historical importance to the best in contemporary recordings. The author concludes with a list of 30 (or so) sound recordings that should be found in any core jazz collection.

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Collection Building, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Frederick J. Brigham, Soo Y. Ahn, Ashley N. Stride and John William McKenna

The pejorative academic and social challenges experienced by students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are well documented. In an effort to improve student…

Abstract

The pejorative academic and social challenges experienced by students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are well documented. In an effort to improve student outcomes, schools often employ inclusive models of instruction and support. However, the implementation of inclusive models may result in students with EBD having fewer opportunities to develop essential skills and competencies rather than the provision of special education services that promote school and transition success. This may occur in instances in which stake-holders emphasize student placement in general education without giving equal consideration to the necessary specialized supports and instruction for students with EBD to be meaningfully included. The current chapter urges stake-holders to consider the degree to which inclusive practices for students with EBD also meet FAPE mandates. It is our contention that students with EBD will only benefit from general education settings to the degree to which this placement provides opportunities to develop academic, social, and adaptive skills.

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General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Impact on Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-541-6

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Rahim Ajao Ganiyu

Western management philosophy and thought have been around for millennia; however, the supremacy of its concepts and writings has become a subject of criticisms in Africa…

Abstract

Western management philosophy and thought have been around for millennia; however, the supremacy of its concepts and writings has become a subject of criticisms in Africa. There is a huge gap in African management education which calls for redesigning of management curriculum to affirm African social orientation and self-determination that will enable new forms of learning and knowledge required to tackle complex global challenges. The objective of this chapter is to review Western management thought and practice vis-à-vis the existing management philosophy in Africa prior to her colonisation and advocate the need to redesign management curricula. To accomplish the aforementioned objective, this chapter took a historical, reflective and systematic approach of literature review to advance renewal of management curricula in Africa. The analysis began with a review of pre-colonial management philosophy and thought in Africa, followed by a discussion of how colonialism obstructed and promoted the universality of management. This was followed by a review of African traditional society and indigenous management philosophies. The chapter discussed topics that should feature in an African-oriented management curriculum and highlighted fundamental constructs that can be fused into management curriculum of business schools/teaching in Africa. The chapter also made a case for a flexible management curriculum structure that is broader than the conventional transmission-of-knowledge building which views students as passive learners’ by adopting suitable pedagogical tools that will be relevant for knowledge transmission and assessment and also enhance learning and management practices that is culturally fit and relevant to global practice.

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Indigenous Management Practices in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-849-7

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Paula Fomby

Ambridge residents live with extended kin and non-family members much more often than the population of the United Kingdom as a whole. This chapter explores cultural…

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Ambridge residents live with extended kin and non-family members much more often than the population of the United Kingdom as a whole. This chapter explores cultural norms, economic need, and family and health care to explain patterns of coresidence in the village of Ambridge. In landed families, filial obligation and inheritance norms bind multigenerational families to a common dwelling, while scarcity of affordable rural housing inhibits residential independence and forces reliance on access to social networks and chance to find a home among the landless. Across the socioeconomic spectrum, coresidence wards off loneliness among unpartnered adults. Finally, for Archers listeners, extended kin and non-kin coresidence creates a private space where dialogue gives added dimensionality and depth to characters who would otherwise be known only through their interactions in public spaces.

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Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

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Article

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Damien Price

With a focus on core concepts such as coming as guest, being present, story, innate dignity and the value of difference, students in a Boys High School spent 6 months…

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With a focus on core concepts such as coming as guest, being present, story, innate dignity and the value of difference, students in a Boys High School spent 6 months volunteering on a hospitality van with the homeless. Over that period the students engaged in varying levels of meaning making linked to their reflection of the experience. While some students remained at a surface level of meaning making, the majority progressed to deeper meaning making and some to the level of existential change. Analysis of the associated case studies would indicate that deepening levels of meaning making are linked to direct engagement with the clients of the service, the active presence of mentors, a longer service engagement, reflection upon experience, critical analysis and the deliberate engagement with the core concepts. This process, along with the development of a supportive inclusive school culture, will provide a platform for the Service-Learning program to enhance inclusivity as a lived and owned value within the participants’ lives.

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Service-Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-185-8

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Globalization and Contextual Factors in Accounting: The Case of Germany
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-245-6

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Article

Loriene Roy

Native peoples living within their cultures find themselves the focus of increased attention and are renewing their own ties in a cultural renaissance. Non‐Natives are…

Abstract

Native peoples living within their cultures find themselves the focus of increased attention and are renewing their own ties in a cultural renaissance. Non‐Natives are becoming more intrigued with both scholarly and popular interpretations of some aspects of Native cultures. Those Native Americans living outside the culture are trying, in varying degrees, to recover old ways, thus attempting to reverse generations of assimilation. It is with the latter group that this article is concerned: the non affiliated Native Americans who are intellectually and/or spiritually as well as physically removed from traditional teachings. What kinds of assistance can libraries provide to Native Americans wishing to reclaim their cultural legacy?

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Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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