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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Guido Veronese, Alessandro Pepe, Giovanni Sala and Marzia Vigliaroni

The purpose of this paper is to report a real-life empirical case and discuss some caveats emerged in measuring subjective well-being (SWB) in an understudied population…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a real-life empirical case and discuss some caveats emerged in measuring subjective well-being (SWB) in an understudied population of adolescents refugees from West Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

During the process of translation and cultural adaptation of the subjective well-being assessment scale in the target population, the model of measurement presented some weakness with regard to content validity criteria.

Findings

This leads to a partial revision of the model and the development of new locally-based domains of SWB.

Originality/value

Context-specific factors’ robustness showed the dynamic and culture-informed nature of the SWB construct. Practical and theoretical implications of using quantitative questionnaires in non-western contexts characterized by high grades of insecurity and instability will be discussed.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Robert Stojanov, Ilan Kelman, Shawn Shen, Barbora Duží, Himani Upadhyay, Dmytro Vikhrov, G.J. Lingaraj and Arabinda Mishra

– The purpose of this paper is to show how typologies for environmentally induced population movement need to be understood in a contextualised manner in order to be useful.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how typologies for environmentally induced population movement need to be understood in a contextualised manner in order to be useful.

Design/methodology/approach

This study interrogates some academic discourses concerning environmentally induced population movement. By analysing key environmental factors said to contribute to population movement, in addition to considering time factors, this study uses the case of Tuvalu to demonstrate overlapping categories and the importance of contextualisation.

Findings

Current typologies provide a basis for considering a wide variety of motives for environmentally induced population movement, in relation to different drivers, motivations, time scales, and space scales. Yet contextualisation is required for policy and practice relevance.

Research limitations/implications

All typologies have limitations. Any typology should be taken as a possible tool to apply in a particular context, or to support decision making, rather than presenting a typology as universal or as an absolute without dispute.

Practical implications

Rather than disputes over typologies and definitions, bringing together different views without reconciling them, but recognising the merits and limitations of each, can provide a basis for assisting people making migration decisions.

Originality/value

None of the typologies currently available applies to all contexts of environmentally induced population movement – nor should any single typology necessarily achieve that. Instead, it is important to thrive on the differences and to contextualise a typology for use.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2010

Giorgia Doná

The paper analyses four different perspectives on well‐being: the medical viewpoint and the hegemony of trauma, the cultural approach and the balance of social, spiritual…

Abstract

The paper analyses four different perspectives on well‐being: the medical viewpoint and the hegemony of trauma, the cultural approach and the balance of social, spiritual and natural realms, the psycho‐social position and the scrutiny of the social environment, and multi‐levelled ecological models that integrate multiple layers. The paper advocates a shift away from analyses of localities/phases/contexts and well‐being towards those of processes, predicated on the separation of physical dis(re)‐locations from psychological dis(em)‐placements. When examining processes and negotiations with life events, of which displacement is one, well‐being is understood as a process of being ‘of’ rather than being ‘in’.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Miriam Kuttikat, Anita Vaillancourt and Michael Massey

The civil war prompted many Tamils to flee Sri Lanka as refugees. Several researchers have documented psychological distress and trauma among Sri Lankan Tamil refugees

Abstract

Purpose

The civil war prompted many Tamils to flee Sri Lanka as refugees. Several researchers have documented psychological distress and trauma among Sri Lankan Tamil refugees, but the literature lacks sufficient discussion of resilience among this population. Although Sri Lankan Tamil refugees have experienced conflict and loss, they have also demonstrated positive adaptation following these challenges. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used an ecological approach, in which the effect of the environment on a person is regarded as significant, to explore resilience among Sri Lankan Tamils living in refugee camps in India.

Findings

Through a qualitative investigation of refugee experiences of war and camp life, the authors developed a conceptual framework for understanding individual and collective resilience among refugees.

Research limitations/implications

Additionally, the results of this study need to be interpreted with caution because participants were camp refugees, which may limit the applicability of these results with refugees who live in different settings.

Practical implications

The current research results show that intervention programs should have multiple components, including trauma intervention to address the individual and community psychological and psychiatric effects of war and migration experiences and psychosocial interventions to address individual, family, community dynamics and daily stressors.

Social implications

The study participants stated that Sri Lankan Tamil refugees are using their resilience traits including will power, positive talk, practical solutions, social support, religion and social networks to remake their broken souls.

Originality/value

Future studies need to be conducted with other refugee group to validate the findings of the paper.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Chhatradhar Das and Raunak Das

Large dams have played a key role in the economic development of a country. They serve a variety of purposes, including electricity generation, flood control and…

Abstract

Large dams have played a key role in the economic development of a country. They serve a variety of purposes, including electricity generation, flood control and irrigation. Nevertheless, development-induced forced migration of human population for the construction of Tehri Dam in Old Tehri of Garhwal–Himalayan region of Uttarakhand has invited lot of controversy in the recent past. A new city has been designed and presented by the government as a solution for the new settlement of migrated people. A large dam has enormous consequences for people's lives and livelihoods. Tehri Dam transforms landscapes of the region greatly, creates risks of irreversible impacts including controversial issues such as displacement and resettlement and also alters the natural functioning of the entire ecosystem. As a consequence of ecological disruption, a large number of human populations lost their migratory routes and considered as ecological refugees in their new habitat. The present study aims to understand how the forced migration has changed people's daily lives in social, cultural, religious and economic aspects. People's perceptions were discerned through participatory discussions. The field work has been carried out through direct communion with the villagers to explore how the government has reacted to the voices of the resettled citizens and how the development process has affected traditional livelihoods of the rural communities.

Details

Refugee Crises and Third-World Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-191-2

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Refugee Crises and Third-World Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-191-2

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Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Debesh Bhowmik

In this chapter, the author has described the nexus between climate change and the evolution of refugee problems. The concept of climate refugee and the controversy…

Abstract

In this chapter, the author has described the nexus between climate change and the evolution of refugee problems. The concept of climate refugee and the controversy between refugee and climate refugee were extensively elaborated. The estimates of climate refugees under various dimensions in different parts of the world were exemplified with statistical figures. The solutions of the refugee problems, funding, directions of estimates and social responsibilities towards refugees are described in the activities of international institutions like UNHCR, CCDO, UNFCCC, IPCC, the Red Cross and many others. The chapter also highlights some important policy issues such as charters, funds, response strategy to disaster and disaster recovery plans, support capacity building and climate change adaptation and so on and also cited policies taken by the G20 summit to care for refugees. Besides, the recommendations of COP23 were also included. In conclusion, ‘no climate change, no climate refugees’ slogan is incorporated with suggestions of taking care of sizable percentage shares of refugees by the rich nations.

Details

Refugee Crises and Third-World Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-191-2

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Rebecca Horn

This study explores the emotional problems affecting refugees in Kakuma refugee camp (northern Kenya). The freelisting technique was used to interview 52 community members…

Abstract

This study explores the emotional problems affecting refugees in Kakuma refugee camp (northern Kenya). The freelisting technique was used to interview 52 community members and 32 ‘key informants’. Freelisting was found to be useful in this setting, and provided information which could assist with advocacy, programme planning and programme evaluation. The emotional problems most frequently identified were hopelessness, fear, sadness, anger/aggression and worry. Both current stressors and previous losses were said to affect emotional well‐being. While psychosocial interventions are important, programmes addressing refugees' practical needs (particularly safety and material needs) will therefore have a positive impact on psychosocial well‐being. These findings also suggest that some anti‐social behaviours which contribute to problems within and between communities in Kakuma are due in part to emotional problems; if so, addressing emotional problems would be a worthwhile use of resources.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Abstract

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International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Rachel Tribe

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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