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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Victoria A. Bakhtina

This paper seeks to discuss technology transfer – and its role in climate change mitigation – within the United Nations framework of sustainable development. Innovation is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss technology transfer – and its role in climate change mitigation – within the United Nations framework of sustainable development. Innovation is broadly considered as a tool to bring about breakthrough results in climate change alleviation. To ensure that innovative technology serves sustainable development, a massive international effort on the part of the regulators is required to create an integrated legislative framework to standardize eco‐innovation policies worldwide. To facilitate a global ecological regulatory framework, it is essential to use universal measurement tools which provide input to the decision‐making process at an international level, and address the mechanism of monitoring progress.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of eco‐innovation potential is introduced as one of the inputs to the decision‐making process on the global level. A composite index with such constituents as ecological balance (deficit or reserve), innovation, and energy intensity of economy, is built. The concept of innovation credits is introduced.

Findings

The simulation shows that ecological balance can potentially be increased for countries with greater eco‐innovation potential. The innovation credits can be given to countries with the highest eco‐innovation potential to foster eco‐innovation and perform technology transfer.

Originality/value

Earlier research developed focus on innovation as a means to transition to sustainable development and to create climate positive technological regimes applied at a national or industry level. The paper illustrates that the eco‐innovation potential index can be applied globally and can provide key input to the decision‐making process at a global level.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Silviya Atanasova Topleva and Tsvetko Velchev Prokopov

The ecological footprint of the food industry and the requirements of the bio-based economy result in the need for deepening the concept of corporate sustainability. CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

The ecological footprint of the food industry and the requirements of the bio-based economy result in the need for deepening the concept of corporate sustainability. CSR provokes the implementation of eco-innovation with high value added. A main source of value added and sustainability is the integrated implementation of ecodesign practices . The purpose of this paper is to systemize an integrated model for the product ecodesign implementation, which combines not only the industrial and process ecodesign but also the overall organizational and socio-economic context of SMEs in food industry, reflected in CSR and value added for stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for implementation of business model for sustainability of the SMEs in the food industry through ecodesign is based on vertical and horizontal integration of well-known self-relevant environmental, social and economic tools such as corporate social responsibility, life-cycle assessment, MET matrix, ecolabelling and stakeholder approach for production and marketing of high-value-added eco-products.

Findings

This study proposes an algorithm for implementation of an integrated business model for SMEs sustainability in the food industry, focusing on high-value-added delivery for stakeholders, based on corporate social responsibility, functional innovation and eco-efficiency. The ecodesign based on CSR business practice in food industry allows simultaneous optimization of environmental aspects and cost structure of products in conditions of improved quality and functionality. Thus, ecodesign contributes to the diversification not only of the company’s product portfolio, but also to opening of new marketplaces and the implementation of new market strategies by increasing the value added.

Practical implications

The research identifies actions, which SMEs in food industry can follow to achieve ecological redesign of their business and production processes that simultaneously enhance product functionality and resource efficiency.

Originality/value

The academic and the social value of the research is the focus on ecodesign and its implementation in SMEs in the food industry as a tool for creation of multidimensional high value added for stakeholders in bio-based economy.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Joko Mariyono, Hanik Anggraeni Dewi, Putu Bagus Daroini, Evy Latifah, Arief Lukman Hakim and Gregory C. Luther

A research and development project disseminated ecological technologies to approximately 3,250 vegetable farmers through farmer field schools (FFS) in four districts of…

Abstract

Purpose

A research and development project disseminated ecological technologies to approximately 3,250 vegetable farmers through farmer field schools (FFS) in four districts of Bali and East Java provinces of Indonesia. This article aims to assess the economic sustainability of vegetable production after FFS participation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey randomly sampled 500 farmers, comprised of FFS participants (50%) and non-FFS participants (50%). Based on 1,000 farm operations, this analysis employed input-saving technology as the fundamental model examined using the double-difference method. Simultaneous reduction of agrochemicals and improvement of productivity represent indicators of economic sustainability.

Findings

Results indicate that pesticide use decreased without jeopardising farm productivity; moreover, vegetable production increased. These findings indicate that the ecological technologies transferred through FFS significantly improved economic sustainability performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study purposively selected farmers who grew tomato and chilli. Thus, the outcomes are not generalisable to other crops.

Practical implications

FFS continues to be an effective method for transferring agricultural technologies to farmer communities. Policymakers are recommended to use FFS for disseminating beneficial and sustainable technologies to broader agricultural communities.

Social implications

The adoption of ecological technologies provides positive economic and ecological milieus.

Originality/value

This study employs a double-differences approach to verify input-saving technological progress. Therefore, the performance of economic sustainability attributable to the project intervention is theoretically justified.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Kala Saravanamuthu

Scientists are constructing knowledge about global warming by adapting evidence-based disciplines to reflect the Precautionary Principle. It is equally important to…

Abstract

Scientists are constructing knowledge about global warming by adapting evidence-based disciplines to reflect the Precautionary Principle. It is equally important to communicate the complexities and uncertainties underpinning global warming because inappropriate vehicles for giving accounts could result in defensive decisions that perpetuate the business-as-usual mindset: the method of communication affects how the risk associated with global warming is socialised. Appropriately constructed accounts should facilitate reflective communicative action. Here Beck's theorisation of risk society, Luhmann's sociological theory of risk and Gandhi's vehicle of communicative action (or satyagraha) are used to construct a risk-based accountability mechanism, whilst providing insight into Schumacher's concept of total accountability. These accountability constructs will be illustrated through the lived experiences of South Australian citrus horticulturists in the context of a richly layered narrative of competing discourses about global warming. The reiterative process of theory informing practice is used to construct a couple of dialogical vehicles of accountability.

Details

Extending Schumacher's Concept of Total Accounting and Accountability into the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-301-9

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

Leyla Yılmaz Fındık, İlknur Bayram and Özlem Canaran

The purpose of this paper is to explore how sustainable development (SD) is conceptualized by pre-service English language teachers in Turkey and design a specialized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how sustainable development (SD) is conceptualized by pre-service English language teachers in Turkey and design a specialized course syllabus on SD in English language teaching (ELT) in the light of the research findings.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a mixed-methods sequential explanatory study design and investigated the case of a state university in Turkey with the involvement of 133 pre-service English language teachers.

Findings

The findings indicated that most pre-service English language teachers received no training or a course on SD in their whole education life and tended to associate SD mostly with the economic growth of a country, followed by education, social and ecological concepts. It was also found that the majority of the participants had a unidimensional view of SD. No direct links with ELT have been detected from participants’ responses. The findings also pointed to the eagerness of the participants to receive an ELT-specific course on SD providing that the course involves interactive teaching and learning activities with reference to contemporary sources focusing on global and local issues, as well as studying the methods facilitating the incorporation of such issues into teaching practice.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on the experience of one Turkish university with limited quantitative and qualitative data.

Practical implications

Based on the participants’ knowledge, views and suggestions, this paper contributes to the existing literature by providing empirical evidence obtained from a local context and suggests a practical framework for a field-specific course syllabus aiming to enhance teacher candidates’ knowledge, skills and values related to SD and its incorporation into ELT.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study seeking to explore pre-service ELT teachers’ conceptualization of SD in Turkish higher education, and drawing on the research findings, the authors attempted to design a course syllabus targeted at pre-service teachers in ELT departments.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

M. Ruhul Amin and Sharmistha Banerjee

The purpose of this paper is to review general applications of the ISO14001 certification process and show how limitations such as ensuring minimum environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review general applications of the ISO14001 certification process and show how limitations such as ensuring minimum environmental performance standard, public access to performance information, and peer benchmarking may be overcome by voluntary commitment to attainable standards by association of specific industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A replicable environmental performance (weighted) index was developed by the authors. Secondary data obtained from five (public and private) steel mills provided technical data under voluntary compliance standards. Primary data on non‐technical items of performance index were collected. The index was tested to demonstrate peer benchmarking process.

Findings

ISO 14001 certification cannot serve as an end in itself for industries as peer companies under voluntary compliance may exceed environmental performance. Minimum acceptable environmental standards could be enforced through industry‐wide consensus. Public access to performance indicators can be ensured under a voluntary mandate; peer benchmarking may allow for competitive goal setting. The model proposed could be gainfully replicated particularly in developing countries.

Research limitations/implications

The weighted index used in the paper could be further expanded to include additional non‐technical items such as occupational employee health and R&D expenditure of plants on environmental management system.

Practical implications

Peer benchmarking should allow for competitive goal setting for continuous improvement. The weighted index could be replicated for other industries in India. This index with minor adjustment, if needed, could be used in other countries and by industries already certified by ISO 14001 standards for peer benchmarking toward continuous improvement.

Originality/value

The weighted index is the original contribution. It is likely to make definitive contribution to the literature of environmental performance measurement. It also makes a contribution to the benchmarking literature in general and to peer benchmarking in particular. The paper not only shows the limitation of ISO 14001 standards but demonstrates how to overcome the limitations toward the competitive goal setting and continuous improvement of performance by the benchmarked industries.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Tachia Chin, Shouyang Wang and Chris Rowley

This study aims to characterise an intricate, idiosyncratic knowledge-creating mechanism in the modern digital context of cross-cultural business models (CBM). From an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to characterise an intricate, idiosyncratic knowledge-creating mechanism in the modern digital context of cross-cultural business models (CBM). From an integrative socio-cultural and philosophical perspective, the authors suggest a novel concept of polychronic knowledge creation (PKC) and its metaphor to theorise such a complex phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature. It critically reviews the literature characterising the flourishing of information and communication technology (ICT)-driven CBMs and clarifies a research gap. The authors draw a dynamic conceptual framework describing how knowledge is created poly-chronically within CBMs, while also articulating and justifying the occurrence of knowledge icebergs as a manifestation of critical cognitive variances and biases in such contexts.

Findings

Building upon existential phenomenology, the authors regard the sea as a parable of the CBM ecosystem and propose the new notion of PKC as a dynamic time-space synthesis and its associated sea-like heuristic metaphor. These elucidate how the intricate interconnectivity of a focal firm with its diverse strategic partners kindles a discursive, multi-path knowledge creation process in ICT-driven CBMs under multiple jurisdictions with manifold cultures.

Research limitations/implications

Implications regarding the role of cross-cultural management in creating new knowledge within CBMs are provided.

Originality/value

The research complements and enriches Nonaka’s (1994) theory and its underlying metaphor “ba” (by incorporating the abstruse yet vital role of culture in the synthesizing process of knowledge creation) to propose the novel ideas of PKC and the sea-like heuristic metaphor in CBMs.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Ewa Bińczyk

The paper surveys selected standpoints in the Polish humanities that are visibly critical toward neoliberal assumptions and claims of economics. The resources used in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper surveys selected standpoints in the Polish humanities that are visibly critical toward neoliberal assumptions and claims of economics. The resources used in the text are: Andrzej Szahaj’s philosophical postulates and assertions; Tadeusz Kowalik’s view; criticism and postulates of social economics articulated by the quarterly magazine Nowy Obywatel (The New Citizen). The purpose of this paper is to construct a possibly cohesive picture of this type of criticism by indicating important similarities between the approaches mentioned above, its strongest arguments, philosophical premises and political inclinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual synthesis and interpretation of theoretical standpoints and its philosophical premises, a comparative analysis of the text/content of the magazine (The New Citizen).

Findings

Each of the three standpoints discussed in the paper proves to be an interesting example of social economics. It is also symptomatic that they share a similar, critical attitude toward the way in which the transformation of the Polish economy from a socialist to a capitalist system had been carried out. The transformation is thereby interpreted as a process that is not accomplished at all from the point of view of the ideals of social justice and integrity.

Practical implications

The popularization of Polish normative views of economics taking into account the problem of social justice, and the possible transformation of the way in which economic problems are publicly understood in Poland.

Originality/value

The discussion of non-standard interpretations of Polish transformation and its effects that undermine and challenge neoliberal ideology in economics.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2017

Mansi Mansi, Rakesh Pandey and Ehtasham Ghauri

This study aims to explore the weightage rendered to corporate social responsibility (CSR) keywords in mission and vision (M&V) statements of public sector enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the weightage rendered to corporate social responsibility (CSR) keywords in mission and vision (M&V) statements of public sector enterprises (PSEs) in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysing the contents of M&V statements of 230 PSEs, this study has the twin research objectives of seeking to illuminate the current use of CSR-related keywords in PSEs’ M&V statements that reflect organisational strategy and provide an understanding for how firm age, industry and firm size variables serve to influence CSR keyword reporting in these statements.

Findings

The findings of this study provide evidence that half of the Indian PSEs reported at least one CSR-related keyword in their M&V statements. These public enterprises predominantly use 38 different categories of CSR keywords in their M&V statements. Furthermore, the authors find that environment-related keywords were predominantly used by PSEs in their M&V statements. The results indicate that PSEs’ size and industries are significantly associated with the use of CSR-related keywords in M&V statements, suggesting that bigger PSEs and PSEs in extractive industries (e.g. mining, coal and petroleum) tend to report more CSR-related keywords in their M&V statements.

Research limitations/implications

Findings imply that small public enterprises (those having a low annual turnover) lack CSR focus in their M&V statements. The authors argue that, irrespective of the size of the enterprise, CSR should be an integral part of these PSEs in framing their M&V statements.

Originality/value

This study systematically analyses CSR-related keywords in the M&V statements of all PSEs in India.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 32 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Amy Z. Zeng

Marketing, entrepreneurship, operations management, and transportation/logistics.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, entrepreneurship, operations management, and transportation/logistics.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for junior, senior undergraduate and first-year graduate business classes. It can be used entirely in business classes in marketing, entrepreneurship, operations management, and transportation/logistics, and parts of it can be used for discussions in classes related to emerging economies/markets, environmental management, sustainability, and technology management.

Case overview

The case builds on the expansion plan considered by a young software company, called Hangzhou Omnipay located in the city of Hangzhou, China. Mr Chao, Vice President (VP) of Omnipay, is the main character of the case. He was aware of the current car-sharing industry leader – Zipcar headquartered in Boston and also identified multiple stakeholders in the city for decision making. By collaborating with a global student project team, Mr Chao collected a great deal of information and data. This teaching case provides students and educators ample opportunities to examine, from a multitude of aspects, the viability of a car-sharing service in Hangzhou.

Expected learning outcomes

The central goal is to help students gain a comprehensive understanding of the role of car-sharing service in a country's development in sustainability, socio-economy, environmental commitment, and new urban life style, as well as in a technological company's active pursuit of business expansion opportunity. In addition, students will not only understand the social, cultural, technological and strategic perspectives of car-sharing service implementation, but also develop and enhance analytic skills needed to conduct fundamental cost analysis, determine a base-line pricing scheme, and service location network design.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available, please contact your librarian for access.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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