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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Esther Calderon-Monge, Roger-Guzman Redondo-Rodriguez and José M. Ramírez-Hurtado

The gap between the self-declarations of buyers as responsible consumers and the purchase of sustainable products means that consumer knowledge needs to be examined in…

Abstract

Purpose

The gap between the self-declarations of buyers as responsible consumers and the purchase of sustainable products means that consumer knowledge needs to be examined in depth, to guide the initiatives of eco-entrepreneurs towards sectors and demands that will make them viable and to advance responsible production and consumption – Objective 12: Sustainable Development 2030. The purpose of this study is to analyse the profile of consumers in relation to the purchase of ecolabelled products and to establish relations between purchasing decisions with environmental, social and ethical factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple correspondence analysis is applied to the results of a questionnaire administered to a sample of 407 consumers resident in Spain. Information is gathered on environmental, social and economic concerns and the importance consumers attach to certain product attributes such as ecolabels, price and quality.

Findings

Consumers concerned over environmental, social and economic questions attached greater importance to information on ecolabels, principally within the textile, and drugstore sectors, followed by electrical and electronic appliances and the food sector. These consumers selected ecolabelled products with a good quality–price relationship.

Originality/value

The academic and business value of this research is its focus on the attributes of sustainable products so that eco-entrepreneurs may advance initiatives that are at once viable and sustainable, motivating consumers with concerns over environmental, social and economic issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Michaela A. Balzarova

This paper aims to investigate the potential of blockchain technology (BCT) for enhancing the effectiveness of ecolabelling schemes (ecolabels). The paper examines…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential of blockchain technology (BCT) for enhancing the effectiveness of ecolabelling schemes (ecolabels). The paper examines ecolabels’ effectiveness across three criteria – reducing adverse environmental and social impacts, enhancing quality and safety standards during production and service delivery and increasing producer’s trading power via decreased information asymmetry. These three categories are compared with technology’s status quo, linking use cases relevant to the enhancement of contemporary ecolabels’ effectiveness. Conclusions are drawn over BCT’s potential for enhancing the effectiveness of ecolabels. The paper also offers directions for future research related to BCT and purpose-driven ecolabels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative interpretivist approach to investigate the potential BCT represents for enhancement of the effectiveness of ecolabelling schemes (ecolabels). The paper identifies three criteria against which ecolabels can be assessed in respect to their effectiveness. Additionally, it looks for linkages between the design of ecolabels and a creation and utilisation of improved practices in a given industry. This conceptual literature review resulted in a framework for ecolabels’ effectiveness and a lens to review BCT-related literature with potential to enhance ecolabels’ design and trading practices.

Findings

There is an undeniable shift in attitude towards the adoption of BCT, stepping away from the naïve notion that BCT can fix all the problems encountered in a supply chain. On the one hand, BCT offers to better inform consumers of the green benefits ecolabelled products provide. On the other hand, a broader application of BCT currently faces a trilemma of challenges related to issues of decentralisation, security and scalability. BCT’s presence is likely to force ecolabelling organisations to review their position on the market and their intended purpose in the marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a conceptual literature review and derives with three key themes grouping ecolabels against their efficiencies. These themes provide scope for a search of relevant blockchain-embedded use cases that may or may not contribute to the enhancement of ecolabels’ impact. This is a conceptual, theoretical review of possible approaches that can be adopted by commerce with predictions relevant to ecolabels. This paper does not claim any empirical findings.

Practical implications

Despite interest BCT gained to date, the technology still deals with unresolved issues related to decentralisation, scalability and security. Many studies advise caution, and some do not view the technology as disruptive but foundational. The paper provides references to studies that assist organisations with a decision, whether it is the right time to invest in BCT or not.

Social implications

This paper adds to the ambition most ecolabels strive for, and that is to mitigate adverse environmental and social impacts production of conventional products may have. Use cases embedded in BCT offer insights into the impacts of enhanced transparency within supply chains. For example, BCT is likely to work well for improving the lives of those producing the foods we eat while informing on issues such as child labour or planting of new trees as part of an offset program.

Originality/value

This paper’s contribution is manifold. First, it delivers a qualitative conceptual analysis of principal ecolabels against their stated purpose. Second, it reviews the BCT literature and identifies cases that are able to provide perspective on the technology’s relevance to ecolabels’ effectiveness. Third, by exploring the overlap of the two concepts, this paper discusses the likelihood of future BCT’s utilisation in ecolabelling programs.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

John Thøgersen, Pernille Haugaard and Anja Olesen

The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a framework for understanding consumer responses to ecolabelling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a framework for understanding consumer responses to ecolabelling.

Design/methodology/approach

From a consumer perspective, ecolabels are tools for supporting decision making with regard to environmentally significant products. The paper proposes an adoption of innovation framework for understanding consumer responses. The framework is applied in a mall‐intercept survey of the early adoption of a new ecolabel, the MSC label for sustainable fishery, in Denmark.

Findings

Early adopters of a new ecolabel mostly employ a high effort adoption process. Starting the adoption process depends on both motivation (intention to buy sustainable fish products) and ability (issue‐relevant knowledge). Whether and how quickly the consumer completes the adoption depends on his or her motivation, past experience with using ecolabels, and trust in the endorsing organisation.

Research limitations/implications

Environmental and product‐related factors did not differ between respondents. Hence, a complete account of the importance of these factors for the adoption and (especially) diffusion of the label is not provided.

Practical implications

Consumers scoring highly on both issue‐relevant knowledge and motivation are the most likely innovators and early adopters. Their high level of expertise means that they do not need a lot of explanation for understanding the label and its self‐relevance and their strong motivation means that they will search for more if they need it (and if it is not too difficult to get).

Originality/value

The paper makes both a conceptual and an empirical contribution, which are of value both to practitioners (ecolabel promoters and users) and to research on ecolabel effectiveness.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Clare D’Souza

Ecolabels” without advertising support are communicating the environmentally friendly message. This article investigates the general belief and evaluation consumers have…

Abstract

Ecolabels” without advertising support are communicating the environmentally friendly message. This article investigates the general belief and evaluation consumers have about ecolabelled products. In conventional markets, labelling conveys to the consumer information about the product. Appropriate communication in the form of symbols reinforces messages. Ecolabels enable consumers to articulate their preferences for environmental friendly products. Consumer beliefs are highly regarded as they serve to simplify the cognitive process of decision making. This study examines the impact of communicating the environmental friendly message by the dolphin‐safe symbol on four brands of tuna. It examines the effectiveness of brand perception on environmentally friendly products. Results indicate that consumers are favourably influenced by the presence of these labels regardless of type of product, thus supporting an affective evaluation process. Consumer perceptions of the two top selling brands are perceived to be more environmentally friendly than the other brands.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Muhammad Ali

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the effects of environmental knowledge and green consumption as mediators on the relationship between green marketing and green…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the effects of environmental knowledge and green consumption as mediators on the relationship between green marketing and green buying behavior. This study utilized the definition that needs to customers that are based on environmental concerns and influence the buying behavior for green products. This not only focuses on the ecological concern in organizational operations but also focuses on the customers' knowledge about the environment and how it influences their decisions. Three dimensions have been identified in this research to describe green marketing. These are ecolabeling, green branding and green advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research method has been utilized to collect data on a questionnaire adapted from previous research. The data collected have been analyzed with SmartPLS to assess the measurement model for reliability and validity and structural model for hypothesis testing and confirmation.

Findings

Focusing on the level of environmental knowledge of customers, it comes to surface that customers in developing countries have lesser knowledge in comparison to the customers in developed countries. This causes concern for the marketing departments in organizations since different customer niches demand different marketing solutions to influence their buying decision. Environmental knowledge does not mediate the relationship between green marketing and green buying behavior whereas green consumption mediates the relationship between green marketing and green buying behavior.

Originality/value

This study incorporates the social practice theory in green marketing research on the organizational level. This study brings together marketing practices under the influence of environmental knowledge for buying behavior formation in a novel manner. The influencing of customer decisions through green marketing strategies determines the success of the marketing initiative. Also, the theoretical foundations on social practice theory and the empirical design of the study to observe the relationships with the survey are new steps.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Gian Andrea Blengini and Deborah J. Shields

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of corporate sustainability reporting strategies and communication tools that are increasingly being adopted to foster…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of corporate sustainability reporting strategies and communication tools that are increasingly being adopted to foster green market outlets, with focus on the building materials supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The suitability, feasibility, appropriateness, effectiveness, completeness and redundancy of some of the most common sustainability reporting tools such as Sustainability Reporting (SR), Sustainable Development Indicators (SDI) and Green labels based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) were investigated.

Findings

Focusing on the present Italian situation and with emphasis on ornamental stones, ceramic tiles, cement and concrete producers, the interest and the response in the building materials supply chain are highlighted, pointing out strengths, weaknesses and future perspectives.

Practical implications

Green communication tools discussed in the paper can also be used to protect local markets against the unfair competition by those producers that can supply low price building products, but with much higher environmental externalities.

Originality/value

The paper can be considered as a contribution to support the European Commission's and Member States' policymakers which are pushing for instruments that will improve the sustainability of the building products supply chain. The findings can encourage those producers who are more aware of the environmental consequences of extractive and manufacturing activities and that are actively engaged in Sustainable Development.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Jasveen K Rattan

The aim of this paper is to provide a background and offer insights of the use of ecolabels and certifications within the tourism industry and their applicability within…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide a background and offer insights of the use of ecolabels and certifications within the tourism industry and their applicability within the volunteer tourism sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes a comprehensive literature review on tourism ecolabels and certification and presents a discussion about volunteer tourism certification.

Findings

The paper finds that it is apparent that changes need to be made in the overall practices of operators within the volunteer tourism sector. Guidelines and evaluation techniques are useful, but are not guaranteed in their applicability. However, neither is certification, unless it is monitored and accountable to its stakeholders. Creating a certification that has real world and tangible aspects for its consumers and subscribers would be more useful than one that is very theoretically dense. It is evident that certification can be used as a powerful tool in the quest to attain sustainability, and should not be ignored as a possible solution for the volunteer tourism sector.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive discussion on volunteer tourism certification and the extent to which a certification scheme would aid in alleviating current criticisms of the volunteer tourism sector and increase its social responsibility.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Yatish Joshi and Zillur Rahman

– The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors that predict green purchase behaviour of young educated consumers in Delhi.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors that predict green purchase behaviour of young educated consumers in Delhi.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out on a sample of 1,502 young educated consumers. Structural equation modelling was used to assess the predictive power of considered variables towards green purchasing.

Findings

Results indicate that the variables under study predicted green purchase behaviour of young educated consumers of Delhi in the following descending order: social influence, attitude towards green purchase, perceived environmental knowledge, recycling participation, ecolabelling and exposure to environmental messages through the media.

Research limitations/implications

The sample considered in the study was restricted to Delhi only. Further, the predictive power of only a few variables was examined.

Practical implications

The paper identifies key predictors of consumers’ green purchase behaviour, enabling practitioners to understand which factors influence young educated consumers in their decision making regarding green purchases. This knowledge will help marketing managers design effective strategies to encourage green purchase behaviour among such consumers.

Social implications

Policy makers and government organizations may use the findings of this study to run awareness campaigns for disseminating information and promoting green purchase behaviour among larger sections of society. Such initiatives may help in minimizing the negative consequences of irresponsible consumption practices on environment and society.

Originality/value

The present study is the first which applies reciprocal deterministic theory to predict green purchase behaviour of educated young consumers in India. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the influence of consumers’ exposure to environmental messages through the media on their green purchase behaviour.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Clare D'Souza

The growing global public concern for safety and preservation of the environment has given rise to the perception that consumer purchases may be somewhat influenced by…

Abstract

The growing global public concern for safety and preservation of the environment has given rise to the perception that consumer purchases may be somewhat influenced by environmental labels. It suggests that accuracy in label information is relevant so as to allow consumers to make an informed choice. This paper proposes that consumers can be grouped using a matrix of four different environmental positions. The results of these grouping are more likely to provide an effective profile of a green consumer, enabling marketers to segment and target these groups based on a clear understanding of consumer behaviour.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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