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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Shem Wambugu Maingi

The purpose of this paper is to understand the causes and effects of overtourism within the East African region. The paper examines how national governments address the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the causes and effects of overtourism within the East African region. The paper examines how national governments address the problem of overtourism in East Africa and determines underlying principles and best practice in sustainable tourism certification, local governance and management in dealing with overtourism.

Design/methodology/approach

To address the objectives, the researcher conducted an exploratory experience survey research design. The study examines the different articles in the subject area and interview findings of practitioner respondents. Based on a review of the existing dimensions of overtourism, the effects of overtourism and local governance, the study sought to derive a holistic (systemic and integrated) perspective on the subject matter.

Findings

The paper presents valuable evidence from industry practitioners on the effects of overtourism in East Africa by classifying the effects as psychological, physical, economic and socio-cultural. Further, the paper examines how East African governments address the problem of overtourism and gives recommendations on ways to enforce, govern and coordinate implementation of tourism regulations and policies in East Africa.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to address overtourism in the context of East Africa, examining different local and innovative approaches to dealing with the impacts of overtourism in an East African context.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Andrew Parris

This paper describes World Vision ' s motivation, context, experience, and learning in improving processes in East Africa. It demonstrates that Lean and Six Sigma…

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1141

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes World Vision ' s motivation, context, experience, and learning in improving processes in East Africa. It demonstrates that Lean and Six Sigma TQM approaches apply to an international non-governmental organisation (INGO) operating in East Africa, and that they can deliver significant process improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings come from initiating process improvement in World Vision in East Africa, observing and reflecting on this experience, and measuring improvements achieved through process improvement projects conducted by World Vision East African staff.

Findings

The INGO and East African contexts provide unique challenges to and demonstrate a strong need for process excellence. However, a standard process improvement approach can be used. A key segment of World Vision staff in East Africa has caught the vision of process excellence, understood and applied TQM concepts and tools, and significantly improved key processes, for example, reduced by 40-80 per cent the average time to procure items and recruit new staff. We have reduced annual expenses by nearly $1,000,000. Such improvements help World Vision to achieve better outcomes with existing funding, people, and other resources.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that Lean and Six Sigma apply to and are vital for both NGOs and the East African context. It describes World Vision Process Excellence and improvements achieved. It presents challenges faced and lessons learned along the way. Finally, it calls on others to join the Lean Six Sigma TQM journey in NGOs and East Africa.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2017

Mike Rosenberg

Abstract

Details

Strategy and Geopolitics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-568-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Caroline Njeri Wanyoike and Matilda Maseno

This paper aims to investigate the motivations of social entrepreneurs in East Africa to create a social enterprise and their identified links to successful social…

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1194

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the motivations of social entrepreneurs in East Africa to create a social enterprise and their identified links to successful social entrepreneurship in East Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a qualitative method by performing thematic analysis on a set of interviews on social entrepreneurs from East Africa who are Ashoka fellows.

Findings

The findings suggest that intense personal experiences linked to past-life events as well as a high achievement orientation towards improving livelihoods and creating impact serve as key triggers for social entrepreneurship. Successful entrepreneurship focusses on system change at national and local levels. Their success is also seen when the social entrepreneurs have achieved their mission and are no longer needed; thus, they become irrelevant. The paper discusses the implications of these findings on the model used for sustainable social entrepreneurship in East Africa.

Practical implications

Based on an exploratory research on Ashoka fellows, the study adds insight to their motivations and success which can be used in a wider scale study of the same.

Originality/value

The authors advance the scarce empirical research on East African social entrepreneurs, link success factors of social entrepreneurship to a recent framework on motivation to engage in social entrepreneurship and stimulate further research in the area. The study contributes to the literature on social entrepreneurship by linking success factors of social entrepreneurship to a recent framework on motivation to engage in social entrepreneurship.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Erick Rading Outa, Peterson Ozili and Paul Eisenberg

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative value relevance of accounting information arising from the adoption of converged and revised International Accounting…

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1023

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative value relevance of accounting information arising from the adoption of converged and revised International Accounting Standards (IAS)/International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in East Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The research applies “same firm year” design for identification of the effects of changes in accounting standards. A model similar to Ohlson’s price model and random-effects GLS are used to estimate R2 of the regressions of share prices on book values and earnings.

Findings

The results show that accounting information prepared from revised and converged IAS/IFRS display higher value relevance and also increased following the revision and convergence of IAS/IFRS. The cross-product term is more significant in the post-revision/convergence period thus providing further evidence for increased value relevance after the revision of IAS/IFRS. The results are robust to various models and show that value relevance in East Africa is relatively lower than that of the developed markets.

Originality/value

The current study provides empirical evidence that value relevance increases with converged/revised IAS/IFRS based on quasi natural experimental setting in East Africa. The authors also extend the debate on whether value relevance is relevant in emerging markets, which are regarded as imperfect markets with few regulations, weak enforcement and limited sources of information. The results may be useful to accounting preparers, regulators, investors, standard setters and countries seeking to adopt IAS/IFRS in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Akilou Amadou and Tchamsé Aronda

Recent works on the structural transformation of developing countries usually include only a few countries because of the availability of data. Beyond the resulting lack…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent works on the structural transformation of developing countries usually include only a few countries because of the availability of data. Beyond the resulting lack of representativeness, these works also hit a strong disparity between the labour reallocation patterns of sub-regions. This paper devoted to sub-Saharan Africa, evaluates the performance of sub-Saharan Africa, as a whole, in structural transformation using a more exhaustive database and highlights key disparities that exist between the performances of sub-Saharan African sub-regions.

Design/methodology/approach

With a database covering 43 sub-Saharan African countries classified into 4 sub-regions, the paper uses the shift-share method over the period 1991–2012 with sub-periods of 1991–2000 and 2000–2012.

Findings

Results show that labour reallocation in sub-Saharan Africa occurred, though weakly, towards more productive activities over the period 1991–2012. Results also show a significant disparity between sub-regions' labour reallocation pattern. While East Africa has experienced a labour reallocation towards more productive activities, West Africa has seen a labour reallocation towards activities experiencing an increase in productivity. Central Africa and Southern Africa experienced a labour reallocation towards less productive activities, and these activities know, moreover, a decrease of productivity.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that any political strategy purposing to coordinate structural transformation in sub-Saharan Africa will result in a failure if countries' peculiarities are not taken into account.

Originality/value

This paper offers a representative picture of sub-Saharan Africa's structural transformation and illustrates disparities between its sub-regions' performances.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 7 July 2015

UAE interests in East Africa.

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 7 April 2017

Several of Africa’s largest alcohol markets are in East Africa. Changing consumer tastes, economic growth and government policies are shaping the landscape of the sector…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB220140

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Influence of Asian powers in Africa.

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

Graham Baldock

– This paper aims to examine the perception of corruption across Europe, Middle East and Africa across a small population of Compliance employees within a global organisation.

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826

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the perception of corruption across Europe, Middle East and Africa across a small population of Compliance employees within a global organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey consisting of 18 open and closed style questions and those using the Likert scale to measure perceptions was used in this research. Some of the questions were designed to enable supporting commentary to be provided.

Findings

This paper has only compounded the general published view of non-governmental organisations and academics that corruption is real and widespread and affects society, irrespective of age, culture or geographic location.

Research limitations/implications

This study was targeted at a Compliance function within one organisation. Even though all the respondents would have had the same training, their perception might not be the same as individuals in the same country who were not employed within the same organisation.

Practical implications

This may benefit companies from a training perspective, as it demonstrates the variety of opinions that exist within one organisation. It may also be of interest to organisations such as Transparency International, who conduct periodic research into the perception of corruption.

Social implications

This research highlights the differences of opinion just within one organisation and thereby demonstrates the difficulties faced in tackling corruption.

Originality/value

As this research was conducted from an internal perspective within one organization, it provides a unique insight into the views and opinions of employees across Europe, Middle East and Africa.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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