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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2009

Timothy W. Luke

This preliminary survey begins to probe a few purposes and practices of “Earth System Science” to rethink the ways in which Nature is “taken into account” by this new…

Abstract

This preliminary survey begins to probe a few purposes and practices of “Earth System Science” to rethink the ways in which Nature is “taken into account” by this new power/knowledge formation. The workings of “environmentality,” or green governmentality (Luke, 1999c), and the dispositions of environmental accountancy regimes depend increasingly on the development and deployment of such reconceptualized interdisciplinary sciences (Briden & Downing, 2002). These practices have gained much more cohesion as a technoscience network since 2001 Amsterdam Conference on Global Climate Change Open Science. Due to its brevity, this study is neither an exhaustive history nor an extensive sociology of either Earth System Science or the new post-2001 Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP), which acquired new legitimacy during and after this professional-technical congress. Instead this critique reexamines these disciplinary developments to explore the curious condition of their rapid assembly and gradual acceptance as credible technoscience formations. This reevaluation allows one, at the same time, to speculate about the emergent interests hoping to gain hold over such power/knowledge programs for managing security, territory, and population on a planetary scale (Burchell, Gordon, & Miller, 1991; Foucault, 1991c, pp. 87–104).

Details

Nature, Knowledge and Negation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-606-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2008

James D. Myers and Garth Massey

Purpose – A geologist and sociologist have developed a pair of Earth resource courses to teach geology in global context and critical thinking and negotiation skills. The…

Abstract

Purpose – A geologist and sociologist have developed a pair of Earth resource courses to teach geology in global context and critical thinking and negotiation skills. The energy and minerals courses emphasize the physical and geological sciences as well as an understanding of the political, social structural, cultural, economic, and environmental factors that influence resource extraction and use. We are seeking to develop the global citizenship skills students will need to participate in future discussions on Earth resource issues. To this end, active learning approaches involve students in group problem solving and negotiation.

Methodology – For five years we have been developing these courses and regularly assessing the accomplishment of course goals. Focus groups and before/after surveys guide course modifications.

Findings – Though limited, our evidence shows an increased awareness and willingness on the part of our students to engage in discussions searching for solutions to Earth resource issues. Geology students are enthusiastic about the content that goes beyond geology. Non-geology students appreciate knowing more of the science of Earth resources that help thereby providing critical insight and background for their interest in environmental and social problems.

Value of the paper – The L(SC)2 paradigm we have developed can be adopted or adapted to a variety of possible partnerships between the sciences and the social sciences and humanities. Studying Earth resource issues in global context connects the immediate concerns of consumers to the practices and problems of Earth resource extraction and processing around the world to better foster citizen involvement.

Details

Integrating the Sciences and Society: Challenges, Practices, and Potentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-299-9

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Jacques G. Richardson and Walter R. Erdelen

This study aims to assess progress toward achieving international (United Nations’) goals and targets for attaining sustainable development and discuss the risks of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess progress toward achieving international (United Nations’) goals and targets for attaining sustainable development and discuss the risks of worldwide failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors highlight the relationship between global goals/targets and governance, relate this to the concept of sustainable development, outline and compare Millennium Development Goals and their successors, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and lastly view SDG implementation from two major spaces i.e. the governance and science space, respectively.

Findings

Governance and culture as new components of sustainable development may be sine qua non for humanity’s transformative action toward global and just sustainable development. Through fostering informed decision and policymaking, modern science, as sketched in this contribution, should provide the framework for realizing Agenda 2030. Earth System Science and its innovative notions such as the Anthropocene, planetary boundaries, tipping points and tipping elements will be key in the process of “designing” blank a sustainable future of and for Homo sapiens.

Originality/value

This essay proposes developing holistic approaches to cooperate at all levels in urgent efforts to meet goals projected for 2030 and 2050. The complexity and functioning of the governance space, comprising a system of governance systems, is illustrated not only in the diversity of the institutional landscape but in particular through the blurring of all scales – local to global.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Brian B. Carpenter

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Robin Robertson

This paper aims to present the physics of climate and climate change in an accessible manner to the layman in the context of shifting spheres.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the physics of climate and climate change in an accessible manner to the layman in the context of shifting spheres.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the physics of climate and climate change in an accessible manner to the layman in the context of shifting spheres. This is a viewpoint and more of a literature review than new findings.

Findings

Earth's climate is changing due to man's influence.

Social implications

Climate change will be a major factor in the future of our society.

Originality/value

The text is original. The information is not. There is recent information in this article. The author even updated things during the review process. The science is always improving.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Jenny Richards, Scott Allan Orr and Heather Viles

This paper questions the common perception within heritage science that the environment is seen primarily as a risk factor that can change or impact heritage. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper questions the common perception within heritage science that the environment is seen primarily as a risk factor that can change or impact heritage. The purpose of this paper is to reconceptualise the relationship between heritage and the environment within an Earth System Science framework, enabling a more sustainable approach for understanding and conserving heritage sites to be implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the relationship between heritage and the environment, this paper considers how perceptions of the environment within heritage science have been shaped in response to the conservation challenges facing movable heritage. Furthermore, as heritage encompasses a wide array of immovable buildings and sites whose relationships with the environment are complex and nuanced, this paper premises that the environment cannot be considered separately from heritage as it is intrinsically related by: providing components of heritage; modifying heritage; being modified by heritage; adding to heritage value; and acting as a co-creator of heritage.

Findings

This paper proposes that heritage science should learn from, and work within, the well-established Earth System Science framework. This enables interactions and feedbacks between heritage and components of the environment to be explored across a range of scales.

Practical implications

This systems-based approach allows heritage science to consider the environment more holistically and sustainably within its research and practice and better equips it to conserve movable and immovable heritage in the Anthropocene.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel approach for viewing the relationship between heritage and the environment by using a well-established framework from other highly interdisciplinary fields.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

April M. Love

Outlines the topics covered at the 2003 National Meeting of the GeoScience Information Society (GSIS) in Seattle, November 2003, which also included the announcement of…

Abstract

Outlines the topics covered at the 2003 National Meeting of the GeoScience Information Society (GSIS) in Seattle, November 2003, which also included the announcement of the launch of GeoScience World, an aggregator resource for research and communications in geological and earth sciences on the Internet.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Kay Neville

Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Angela P. Murillo

The purpose of this study is to examine the information needs of earth and environmental scientists regarding how they determine data reusability and relevance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the information needs of earth and environmental scientists regarding how they determine data reusability and relevance. Additionally, this study provides strategies for the development of data collections and recommendations for data management and curation for information professionals working alongside researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multi-phase mixed-method approach. The test environment is the DataONE data repository. Phase 1 includes a qualitative and quantitative content analysis of deposited data. Phase 2 consists of a quasi-experiment think-aloud study. This paper reports mainly on Phase 2.

Findings

This study identifies earth and environmental scientists’ information needs to determine data reusability. The findings include a need for information regarding research methods, instruments and data descriptions when determining data reusability, as well as a restructuring of data abstracts. Additional findings include reorganizing of the data record layout and data citation information.

Research limitations/implications

While this study was limited to earth and environmental science data, the findings provide feedback for scientists in other disciplines, as earth and environmental science is a highly interdisciplinary scientific domain that pulls from many disciplines, including biology, ecology and geology, and additionally there has been a significant increase in interdisciplinary research in many scientific fields.

Practical implications

The practical implications include concrete feedback to data librarians, data curators and repository managers, as well as other information professionals as to the information needs of scientists reusing data. The suggestions could be implemented to improve consultative practices when working alongside scientists regarding data deposition and data creation. These suggestions could improve policies for data repositories through direct feedback from scientists. These suggestions could be implemented to improve how data repositories are created and what should be considered mandatory information and secondary information to improve the reusability of data.

Social implications

By examining the information needs of earth and environmental scientists reusing data, this study provides feedback that could change current practices in data deposition, which ultimately could improve the potentiality of data reuse.

Originality/value

While there has been research conducted on data sharing and reuse, this study provides more detailed granularity regarding what information is needed to determine reusability. This study sets itself apart by not focusing on social motivators and demotivators, but by focusing on information provided in a data record.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

J.J. Boersema, G.W.J. Barendse, J. Bertels and A.E. de Wit

Conducts an analysis of the content and scope of textbooks in environmental science, and discusses what to do about possible shortcomings. In almost all introductory…

Abstract

Conducts an analysis of the content and scope of textbooks in environmental science, and discusses what to do about possible shortcomings. In almost all introductory courses, teachers and students make use of textbooks. One may therefore safely assume that the content of these books reflects somehow what is thought to be relevant to the teaching and knowledge of environmental sciences. Scope and content may therefore represent what is considered to be the core curriculum, at least in the eyes of the editors and writers of these books. The analysis is confined to 12 textbooks published over the last five years, of which ten are in the English language, paying most attention to those widely used. Important research questions were: What perspective do the books take? Is their scope clearly depicted? How are environmental problems defined? What are the major issues and concepts dealt with? How are they structured? What is left out and/or missed? None of the books examined takes a disciplinary stance. In nearly all, chooses a thematic approach, with strong emphasis on Earth as a living system, and on the human‐environment interrelationship. There is a rather strong overlap in themes and concepts used, suggesting the existence of a shared “body of knowledge”, which is quite promising when striving after a core curriculum. Social and societal aspects come relatively late on the stage, mostly in the second or third part of the books, when implementation of measures is at stake. In several textbooks, environmental problems are taken as problems formulated and defined by natural scientists. Interdisciplinary methodology does not get proper attention.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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