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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Merli Tamtik

The purpose of this paper is to examine parental and students’ decisions regarding participating in K-12 level study abroad programs in Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine parental and students’ decisions regarding participating in K-12 level study abroad programs in Manitoba, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on data collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with 18 international students and 14 parents.

Findings

The findings suggest that the key factors influencing decisions are perceptions of enhanced career prospects, changing global environments and broadened post-secondary education choices. Country-specific factors include quality and safety of the learning environment, multiculturalism and reputation associated with the country and people.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were primarily students and parents from the EU countries associated primarily with horizontal mobility. Experiences of students from the main sending countries (China, South Korea and Japan) might differ.

Practical implications

The results are relevant to educational managers in designing high-quality international programs and recruitment agents.

Originality/value

The study adds important empirical evidence to the limited research that has been conducted on study abroad experiences at the K-12 level. It is one of the first in the Canadian context. It provides unique perspectives in USA and Canada comparisons for study abroad of school-aged children.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 28 October 2005

Jonathan Rees and John Klapper

This chapter highlights the growing body of international research into the benefits of residence abroad for foreign language students, surveying studies from the past 35…

Abstract

This chapter highlights the growing body of international research into the benefits of residence abroad for foreign language students, surveying studies from the past 35 years originating in both the U.S.A. and the U.K. It examines some of the problematic issues confronting researchers in this area and shows how these issues have contributed to a paucity of studies in the area and led to a diversity in research design. It reports on longitudinal study, the first of its kind in the U.K., which examined the linguistic benefits of residence abroad for a cohort of modern language students from a leading university. This 4-year study used repeated measures proficiency testing, involving a C-test, a grammar test and a range of qualitative measures, to chart the progress made by students on 6- and 12-month study placements in Germany. Findings confirm substantial proficiency gains on both of the main measures but fail to confirm gender and length of residence abroad as predictors of progress. Results also reveal strong differential individual performance during residence abroad. The chapter concludes with recommendations for future research aimed at exploring this key finding further.

Details

International Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-244-3

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Book part
Publication date: 12 March 2003

Bruce D Keillor and James R Emore

The continuing globalization of business and recent world events underscore the importance of educating students to develop a broad world view. Internationalizing the…

Abstract

The continuing globalization of business and recent world events underscore the importance of educating students to develop a broad world view. Internationalizing the undergraduate curriculum has moved to the forefront of higher education in business. And international travel and study has become a core part in the curriculum. However, creating and coordinating a meaningful study abroad experience is perhaps the most challenging issue faced by academics and administrators involved in international business education. While the concept of incorporating a practical or “real world” component into a university degree program is not unique, particularly in business education, the structural obstacles and other difficulties associated with bringing about truly international learning experiences tend to be very different. On the one hand, the student(s) involved generally are highly motivated for such an experience. The challenge on the student side is one of channeling this excitement through the proper process in order to ensure they receive maximum transfer credit. This means, from the institutional side, it is necessary to fit the experience, whose characteristics sometimes fall outside the conventional institutional structure, into an individual’s degree program and still meet administrative criteria as they relate to content, rigor, accreditation requirements, etc.

Details

Study Abroad
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-192-7

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Jeehun Kim

Korean educational migrant (kirogi) families have received widespread popular attention due to their ironic form of family that sacrifices the togetherness of a family…

Abstract

Korean educational migrant (kirogi) families have received widespread popular attention due to their ironic form of family that sacrifices the togetherness of a family. Recent trends suggest that this practice is spreading to the less affluent classes and that many such families are heading to ‘new’ destinations, including Singapore. This study examines the transnational schooling and life experiences of Korean transnational educational families in Singapore. It addresses the questions, why did these families choose Singapore? Why did transnational schooling, which parents almost unanimously said that they had organised for the betterment of their children's future, lead to some families getting stuck in the destination country?

Fieldwork in Singapore and Korea was conducted between April 2006 and September 2007. In-depth interviews with both mothers and fathers who have at least one child attending public, private or international schools in Singapore, at the primary or secondary level, were conducted with 18 families. The analysis was conducted using a grounded theory approach and NVivo 7/8.

Although the Korean state's emphasis on international competitiveness and parental aspirations for their children's future upward social mobility were common motivators, Koreans in Singapore were also attracted by the relatively low cost, English–Chinese bilingualism and other ‘family-friendly’ features in Singapore. However, kirogi children had highly contrasting schooling experiences and they met with mixed success in gaining what they expected. Furthermore, many children in public schools faced demotion and other difficulties in their new school environments. Some less affluent families found themselves facing dilemmas of cross-border schooling. This study shows that transnational schooling does not necessarily operate equally favourably for participants from diverse class backgrounds. It also demonstrates that the societal contexts of reception in both the countries of origin and of destination, including the buffering institutions and reference groups and peer culture, are important factors shaping the schooling and life experiences of educational migrant children and in reconfiguring their trajectories.

Details

Globalization, Changing Demographics, and Educational Challenges in East Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-977-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2018

Mengwei Tu

Abstract

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Education, Migration and Family Relations between China and the UK: The Transnational One-Child Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-673-0

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Jae-Eun Jon and Sung-Sang Yoo

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the policy trends for the internationalization of higher education in Korea, and suggest a future direction toward the pursuit of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the policy trends for the internationalization of higher education in Korea, and suggest a future direction toward the pursuit of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study of Korea focusing on its internationalization in higher education. In order to analyze the government policy trends and institutional strategies for internationalization, the relevant literature and documents were analyzed.

Findings

The government policy for the internationalization of higher education in Korea has consisted of three stages: first, controlled outbound mobility; second, a major shift and focus on inbound mobility, recently along with intraregional cooperation for both directions of mobility in Asia and third, the beginning of efforts toward the pursuit of the SDGs, which needs to be expanded and systematized further.

Originality/value

This paper shows presents the comprehensive review of internationalization policies in Korean higher education, including the recent programs and changes at both the governmental and institutional levels. There has been a notable lack of discussion on the SDGs in relation to the internationalization of Korean higher education, which is addressed in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Pang‐Tien Lieu, Ching‐Wen Lin and Hui‐Fun Yu

This paper primarily uses statistical methods to establish financial early‐warning models that make it possible to predict, in advance, the probability of a company…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper primarily uses statistical methods to establish financial early‐warning models that make it possible to predict, in advance, the probability of a company experiencing financial distress.

Design/methodology/approach

In its empirical analysis, this is the first study that attempts to use financial ratios and non‐financial ratios as variables to analyze business groups, and the present study uses the (K‐S tests), and (M‐U tests) and logit regressions model.

Findings

Financial ratio variables remain the primary variables for predicting corporate financial distress. Upon examining the predictor variables for corporate financial distress at one, two, and three years prior to distress, it was found that financial ratio variables were the main ones at one and two years prior to distress, while at three years prior to distress there was one financial ratio variable and two ownership structure variables that showed significant differences. Financial structure, solvency, profitability, and cash flow indicators are the principal financial ratio variables. Ratios of director and supervisor ownership stakes after pledging of shares differed significantly between financially distressed and non‐distressed companies. Establishing independent directors and supervisors can lower the likelihood of financial distress.

Research limitations/implications

As the time remaining before occurrence of financial distress grows shorter, test results show that the number of financial ratios with significant differences goes up. But the longer the time that remains before occurrence of financial distress, the more the financial ratios show non‐significant differences. That is why a number of scholars hold that the longer the period under study, the less explanatory power it has.

Originality/value

The mean contribution of this paper is that establishing independent directors and supervisors can lower the likelihood of financial distress. The paper is useful to researchers or practitioners who are focused on financial risk management and corporate governance implementation.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Arnoud De Meyer

Globalization of management education seems to have become the natural way to go for management and business schools. Almost every week one can find in the specialized…

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5402

Abstract

Purpose

Globalization of management education seems to have become the natural way to go for management and business schools. Almost every week one can find in the specialized press another announcement about an overseas campus, a new international partnership or a major research tie up. But announcing an international venture is easy, implementing is the challenge. The purpose of this paper is to provide some advice on how to implement globalization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based of the author's own experience with INSEAD, the University of Cambridge and Singapore Management University, as well as his observations of many other business schools. It is thus anchored in a few case studies.

Findings

The author offers some reflections on what he sees as the challenges of implementation and how one can overcome these; focusing in particular on the need to understand what the driver for the globalization is and on implementation issues, e.g. how to build an international brand, some of the lessons one can learn from professional firms about the internationalization of key staff, the impact on the business model of a University, and the need for internationalization of the school's leadership and the deployment of technology.

Originality/value

The paper brings new insights based on an extensive experience with internationalization.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Cara M. Gafford

In this study, I examined the psychosocial factors of habitus and cultural capital, that rural African American students employ to persist and enroll in college after high…

Abstract

In this study, I examined the psychosocial factors of habitus and cultural capital, that rural African American students employ to persist and enroll in college after high school. The purpose of this quantitative inquiry was to gain insights from a rural, Title I, and predominantly African American high school and its influence on students' postsecondary education and how educational preparation programs can provide support to create more equitable outcomes through programs and practice in K-12 settings similar to the school studied. This study used the Survey of Attitudes and Belief (Nora, 2004) to determine the significance of the relationships between the habitus (a student's values and belief systems as developed through one's circumstances or socialized dispositions) and cultural capital (a student's accumulated resources with respect to college, factors that influence college choice). The survey was administered to 184 students at a rural, predominantly African American high school in the south eastern part of the United States. Of the 184 participants, 45% (n = 82) identified as African American and were used in the statistical analysis performed in this chapter. The statistical analysis conducted in this chapter included descriptive analysis, correlation, and multiple linear regression. I found that rural, African American students need additional precollegiate experiences, guidance around colleges and careers, and leadership opportunities.

Details

African American Rural Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-870-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Cristian Morosan, John T. Bowen and Morgan Atwood

The purpose of this study is to provide a domain statement for hospitality marketing research. The objectives of the study are to analyze the evolution of hospitality…

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5265

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide a domain statement for hospitality marketing research. The objectives of the study are to analyze the evolution of hospitality marketing research over the past 25 years, determine how the research paradigms changed over time in hospitality marketing relative to mainstream marketing and provide scholars with suggestions for developing and managing a marketing research agenda. The findings of this study help not only scholars involved in marketing research but also hospitality scholars across all disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of > 1,700 marketing articles is provided, with articles published in three leading hospitality journals and one mainstream marketing journal over a 25-year period. Additionally, the authors consulted leading hospitality scholars to solicit their views and suggestions on hospitality marketing research.

Findings

The results show the evolution of hospitality marketing over a 25-year period. This provides insights into how hospitality has unique aspects, which can lead to contributions in mainstream marketing.

Originality/value

Due to its longitudinal nature and breadth (e.g., number of journals covered), this is the most comprehensive study of hospitality marketing research. The findings of the study provide direction for all hospitality scholars as well as those involved in hospitality marketing research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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