Search results

1 – 10 of over 30000
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Lynette Browning, Kirrilly Thompson and Drew Dawson

The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel strategy for building research capability in a young university with an emerging research culture. Investment in building…

1900

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel strategy for building research capability in a young university with an emerging research culture. Investment in building research capacity is essential for universities to remain competitive, but one of the challenges for younger universities is developing the research capability of individuals in an emerging research culture.

Design/methodology/approach

To gain a better understanding of how leading researchers become research leaders and how universities can design strategies to attract, retain, develop and promote researchers, we carried out a study of 30 research leaders in Australia. We then designed and implemented a cohort-based career development programme for early career researchers.

Findings

From our research, and the programme we developed, we have found that developing early career researchers does not mean teaching them how to do research – it means teaching them how to build a track record, which can lead to a research career. A development programme for early career researchers is a short-term investment for longer-term returns, but these programmes do have immediate impact on research productivity for the individual researchers and for the organisation.

Practical implications

We consider the success of the Early Career Researchers Programme is due to the regular face to face workshops, the development of the research career plan and the supportive research environment provided by the me.

Originality/value

The investment in this programme clearly demonstrates the value of researcher development on research outputs and research careers. These methods could be applied to researcher development training programmes elsewhere.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Narelle Lemon and Susanne Garvis

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate what can be learnt about early career researchers through a narrative self-reflection of two academics’ moving towards the end…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate what can be learnt about early career researchers through a narrative self-reflection of two academics’ moving towards the end of the early career into middle career stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The two academics’ share their experiences as self- study reflective inquiries, specifically as a want and need for “more” through this respective involvement in critically thinking about and planning their career trajectory. Using Schwab's (1969) flights from the field as an interpretative tool, this event is the trigger used to story and re-story the personal experience of the academics through a reflective inquiry approach.

Findings

Looking across the reflective self-studies, the final analysis reveals similarities, differences and tensions of the lived experiences of early career researchers’.

Originality/value

Through listening to the voices of early career academics insights are gained that highlight the need for active agency in the academy while learning from others to focus on building research profiles.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Mohamed Alansari, Jennifer Tatebe and Carol Mutch

The current book chapter seeks to respond to the existing literature on early career researchers, using an autoethnographic approach to further unravel the crossroads of

Abstract

The current book chapter seeks to respond to the existing literature on early career researchers, using an autoethnographic approach to further unravel the crossroads of identity formation, research politics, and successful promotion through the eyes of early career researchers. Combining autobiography and ethnography, we systematically analyze our own experiences to make sense of wider social and political practices. Ellis, Adams, and Bochner (2010) remind us that autoethnography is not to be dismissed as a form of self-therapy but is to be presented in a rigorous manner as other research forms by carefully justifying the data sources and techniques, analyzing the data and crafting the findings. Our sources were both found texts (e.g., university policies) and created texts (our journal entries and personal communications). Using analytic techniques such as highlighting critical incidents or epiphanies, we structured coherent narratives to illuminate the complexity and uncertainty of the lives of early career academics. This chapter’s focus on early career researcher experiences makes poignant commentary on neoliberalism’s impact on and within higher education. The chapter concludes with the authors’ reflections on the dilemmas of academic and research choices made within the limitations of institutional structures, processes, and systems that shape career trajectories.

Details

International Perspectives on Emerging Trends and Integrating Research-based Learning across the Curriculum
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-476-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2022

Irina A. Lokhtina, Montserrat Castelló, Agata Agnieszka Lambrechts, Erika Löfström, Michelle K. McGinn, Isabelle Skakni and Inge van der Weijden

This paper aims to identify the documented effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on early career researcher (ECR) activity, development, career prospects and well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the documented effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on early career researcher (ECR) activity, development, career prospects and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a systematic literature review of English language peer-reviewed studies published between 2020 and 2021, which provided empirical evidence of the impact of the pandemic on ECR activity and development. The search strategy involved online databases (Scopus, Web of Science and Overton); well-established higher education journals (based on Scopus classification) and references in the retained articles (snowballing). The final sample included 11 papers.

Findings

The evidence shows that ECRs have been affected in terms of research activity, researcher development, career prospects and well-being. Although many negative consequences were identified, some promising learning practices have arisen; however, these opportunities were not always fully realised. The results raise questions about differential effects across fields and possible long-term consequences where some fields and some scholars may be worse off due to priorities established as societies struggle to recover.

Practical implications

There is a need for revised institutional and national policies to ensure that sufficient measures are implemented to support ECRs’ research work in a situation where new duties and chores were added during the pandemic.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into the impacts of the initial societal challenges of the pandemic on ECRs across disciplines that may have long-lasting effects on their academic development and well-being.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Stanley Edward Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to identify the implications of recent changes in doctoral education for supervisors who are developing early career researchers in terms of…

1914

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the implications of recent changes in doctoral education for supervisors who are developing early career researchers in terms of the need to develop their professionality.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper seeks to establish an historical benchmark in terms of the Von Humboldt model of doctoral education and the associated master‐apprentice model of supervision. It then sets out the key changes of the past three decades and summarises what is described as the post‐Humboldian doctorate. These changes are then related to the knowledge and skills needed for successful supervisory practice and to the professionality of research supervisors.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that the shift to the post‐Humboldtian doctorate has radically expanded the knowledge, understanding, and skills required by supervisors to successfully develop early career researchers and that these can be arrayed on a continuum represented by indicative characteristics of “restricted” to “extended” professionality as applied to supervisors.

Practical implications

The implications are that professional development programmes for supervisors developing early career researchers need to be reviewed in the light of how far they can support participants to make the full range of adjustments necessary to develop their own professionality as supervisors.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to apply the notion of professionality – and its “restricted”‐“extended” range – to the doctoral supervisory role.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Catherine Flick

This paper aims to introduce the concept of ETHICOMP as “community mentor” – the role that the ETHICOMP conference plays outside the standard conference fare, in which it…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce the concept of ETHICOMP as “community mentor” – the role that the ETHICOMP conference plays outside the standard conference fare, in which it nurtures and supports up-and-coming researchers in the field of computer ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an auto-ethnographic methodology to reflexively explore the author’s career from PhD student to early career researcher spanning the years 2005-2013, and how the ETHICOMP community has played a significant role as a mentor in her life. The literature on mentorship is discussed, particularly focussing on the importance of mentorship for women in philosophy-related academic careers, and criteria for successful mentorship are measured against the ETHICOMP “community mentorship”. Additionally, some key philosophical concepts are introduced and reflected upon.

Findings

The paper produces recommendations for other philosophical communities wishing to grow their mentorship capabilities through communities around conferences.

Originality/value

This paper sheds new light on the concepts of mentorship and the practical application of mentorship within an academic community. It also provides an account of the value of the ETHICOMP conference series that is beyond the usual academic output.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Victoria Pagan

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualise “good” qualitative research by discussing the intersection between “good” qualitative research and different identity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualise “good” qualitative research by discussing the intersection between “good” qualitative research and different identity states of “good” qualitative researcher. It uses the anthropological concept of liminality and related concept of limbo to help illustrate the implications of this intersection.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflexive and personal confessional account is provided of the author’s “living in” the liminal transition of the identity states from full-time PhD student to full-time early career researcher, questioning the author’s experiences in relation to others and the implications for the social construction of “good” qualitative research.

Findings

“Good” qualitative research is not just what to do but how to be. “PhD student” is a defined and temporary transitional liminal identity state. It has a clear point of separation (acceptance and registration of student status) and aggregation (“good” qualitative research signed of through thesis and viva). Contrasting with this is the “early career researcher” identity state, any point of aggregation towards “established researcher” is predicated on the unpredictability of publication and delivering impact indicators.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates unsettling and in-betweenness of “good” qualitative research intersecting with the experience and composition of being a “good” qualitative researcher in the academy. It is important for debates regarding the qualities of academic development from PhD student to established researcher.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Lynette Browning, Kirrilly Thompson and Drew Dawson

The purpose of this paper is to describe organisational strategies that support early career researchers in building a successful track record which can lead to a…

500

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe organisational strategies that support early career researchers in building a successful track record which can lead to a successful academic research career.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on more than a decade of experience designing, implementing and evaluating professional development programmes for early career researchers in universities.

Findings

If an early career researcher is to achieve long-term success, the first five years after graduating with a doctorate are critical in establishing long-term career success. Professional development programmes for early career researchers are more successful if they are supported by organisational strategies around workload, performance management and accountability.

Originality/value

If implemented, these organisational strategies can assist early career researchers to build a successful track record, which can lead to a successful research career and contribute towards increasing aggregate institutional research performance for universities.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Carolyn Gregoric and Annabelle Wilson

– The purpose of this paper is to explore an informal interdisciplinary peer-mentoring relationship between two early career researchers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore an informal interdisciplinary peer-mentoring relationship between two early career researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach, using autoethnography, was employed to explore the relationship from a complex adaptive systems (CAS) perspective.

Findings

Informal peer-mentoring relationships may improve the work effectiveness and quality of the doctoral student and early career researcher experience. CAS can be an effective overarching theory for expanding understandings about mentoring.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is limited to two early career researchers.

Practical implications

Informal peer mentoring may help to overcome challenges encountered by doctoral students, early career researchers and university staff members. CAS accounts of mentoring have the potential to open new possibilities for future mentoring research.

Originality/value

This paper provides unique insights into the experiences of doctoral students postgraduation and a long-term informal peer-mentoring relationship. Explorations of mentoring relationships from a CAS perspective are innovative.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Laura M. Gonzalez, Kelly L. Wester and L. DiAnne Borders

Depending on their institutional context, for new faculty members to successfully manage their transition from doctoral studies to early career, they must show potential…

Abstract

Purpose

Depending on their institutional context, for new faculty members to successfully manage their transition from doctoral studies to early career, they must show potential as researchers. The purpose of this study was to learn about supports and barriers to researcher development in new faculty members.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigators solicited open-ended responses from early career faculty members (N = 49) in an online survey. Content analysis was used to provide an initial categorization of supports and barriers identified by the participants.

Findings

Ten barrier categories (e.g. lack of resources, previous training, lack of mentoring, workload) and eight support categories (e.g. effective research collaborations, supportive university environment, funding) were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Findings were framed with a social cognitive conceptual model, which parallels previous studies in doctoral research training environments and research productivity and builds on our knowledge of early career faculty development. The study was limited in terms of number of participants and online response format.

Practical implications

Practical implications to minimize barriers and enhance supports for new faculty researcher development were identified (also drawing from the conceptual model, SCCT).

Originality/value

Thus, the study has value for university policymakers, administrators, faculty peers, research mentors and assistant professors or doctoral students seeking to develop as researchers.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 30000