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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Leena Busaibe, Sanjay Kumar Singh, Syed Zamberi Ahmad and Sanjaya S. Gaur

This study aims to examine the effect of gender perspectives in organizational leadership and culture on organizational innovations within the oil and gas industry in the…

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1449

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of gender perspectives in organizational leadership and culture on organizational innovations within the oil and gas industry in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

The study examined research in the area of organizational innovation and proposed a framework to help practitioners to create an environment that promotes and strengthens innovation thinking at an institutional level.

Findings

Based on the literature, a framework of organizational innovation was developed with gender as a control factor. It shows the mediating effect of employee performance management on the independent variables, organizational leadership and culture.

Research limitations/implications

The oil and gas industry in the UAE should be a suitable environment for organizational innovation. Gender differences justify further investigation, especially the implications for female leaders, such as promotion and career advancement.

Practical implications

The results of this study will provide practical insights to executives, strategy-makers and practitioners and enable them to increase innovation among individuals and teams.

Originality/value

This study provides a comprehensive framework to assist practitioners and academics to understand the correlation of organizational innovation in the oil and gas industry.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Eahab Elsaid and Nancy D. Ursel

The purpose of this paper is to examine, within a succession framework, the impact of the gender composition of boards of directors on the gender of the CEOs they appoint…

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4967

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine, within a succession framework, the impact of the gender composition of boards of directors on the gender of the CEOs they appoint, and to assess the impact of newly appointed CEOs' gender on risk taking by the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimate a two‐stage least squares regression using data on 679 CEO successions in North American firms.

Findings

The results show that successor CEOs are more likely to be female the greater the percentage of females on the board, regardless of other succession characteristics such as whether the new CEO is from inside or outside the firm. Furthermore, a change in CEO from male to female is associated with a decrease in several measures of firm risk taking.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is restricted to relatively large, exchange‐traded North American firms and may not generalize to other groups.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that women aspiring to CEO positions and firms wishing to promote women should monitor board composition to ensure female representation. Other steps that the firm may take to promote women to this position (such as looking outside the firm) have an insignificant impact when board composition is taken into account.

Originality/value

The findings are novel and inform CEO succession research by demonstrating which succession process characteristics work to increase females' chances and which have no effect. Female CEOs are likely to provide leadership that reduces the risk profile of the firm.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Abdel Moneim Elsaid and Eahab Elsaid

The purpose of this paper is to examine how men and women sex stereotype managerial positions and how they view women in managerial roles in Egypt and the USA, in order to…

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3104

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how men and women sex stereotype managerial positions and how they view women in managerial roles in Egypt and the USA, in order to provide meaningful cross‐cultural comparisons.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses surveys that utilize the Schein descriptive index and the women as managers scale (WAMS) to compare perceptions on women in managerial positions in Egypt and the USA. The sample consists of 553 Egyptian and 324 American management students.

Findings

The results show that in the Egyptian sample both males and females held negative views of women managers. However, in the US sample, women held more favourable views of women managers than did their male counterparts. In the Egyptian sample the English section female students had a more positive perception of female managers than their Arabic section counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to management students in Egypt and the USA. The Middle East includes countries with different cultures, such as Israel. About 10 percent of Egypt's population are Christians who do not necessarily share the same cultural beliefs as the country's Muslim majority.

Practical implications

The paper helps donor countries better direct their aid programs when it comes to promoting gender equality and championing women's rights in the Middle East.

Originality/value

Our contribution was to study the perceptions of female leaders in Egypt, an Arab, Muslim, Middle Eastern country. The gender research on countries with conservative cultures, such as Egypt, is an area that remains mostly unexamined. Our study aims to provide researchers and practitioners with a better understanding of the position of Egyptian women in management.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Eahab Elsaid, Xiaoxin Wang and Wallace N. Davidson

This paper aims to investigate an interesting yet mostly ignored distinction within external CEO successions: outside successors who have previous CEO experience and those…

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2699

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate an interesting yet mostly ignored distinction within external CEO successions: outside successors who have previous CEO experience and those who do not. It examines stock market reaction, compensation and firm performance prior and post‐succession.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used an event study, “Patell Z‐statistic” and “Rank Z‐statistic” to test cumulative abnormal return before and after the successions. They also used probit and OLS regressions to examine firm performance and CEO compensation prior and post‐succession.

Findings

The authors find that the stock market reacts positively to the hiring of an outsider who is an exCEO. Compared with firms that hire non‐exCEOs, firms that hire exCEOs had higher debt ratios and greater bankruptcy chances pre‐succession, but post‐succession, these firms still have worse financial performances. Non‐exCEOs come from better performing firms than exCEOs. There is no consistently significant difference in compensation between an exCEO and a non‐exCEO, though the compensation for both increases significantly from that of the predecessors and that of their previous positions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could focus on the cost‐benefit tradeoff of hiring an exCEO. It would be interesting to examine the role of the board of directors in assessing this cost‐benefit tradeoff and determining the optimal choice for the firm. An important aspect that has not been sufficiently examined in the literature is the CEO fit. Hiring an exCEO may not always be the right choice for the firm. Another area for future research could examine how the post‐succession performance is affected by exCEO tenure in previous CEO position(s) and whether the exCEO worked in several industries or in the same industry.

Practical implications

This paper also has implications for the board of directors. There seems to be a negative transfer of human capital when it comes to hiring exCEOs. The human capital theory suggests that job‐specific experience positively relates to job performance. According to Hamori and Koyuncu, prior CEO experience may “lead to the formation of knowledge corridors and decision‐making templates that make it difficult for individuals to take in inconsistent information or take actions that are different from past ones in a changed context. This, in turn, undermines performance”. Boards of directors should put more effort into considering inside relay successions and should be cautious when hiring an outsider who has prior CEO experience. A best‐of‐both‐worlds scenario may be for boards to hire exCEOs into top executive positions, such as COO and/or president, so as to give them a chance to be groomed for the top position and familiarize themselves with the firm while still benefiting from their prior CEO experience.

Originality/value

There is very little research on the distinction between outside CEOs with previous CEO experience and those with no such experience. This paper tries to shed some light on this important issue in corporate governance in order to explain why boards of directors would hire an outsider with or without previous CEO experience.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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