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ERIC DE BANZIE

IT seems to be the belief of many of our novelists that only through fiction can the truth be told. A practice so rare and commendable as truth‐telling should certainly be…

Abstract

IT seems to be the belief of many of our novelists that only through fiction can the truth be told. A practice so rare and commendable as truth‐telling should certainly be encouraged, but unfortunately in its literary aspect the method adopted is not ideal. Fiction and fact are becoming indistinguishable; the one is increasingly masquerading as the other.

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Library Review, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

ERIC DE BANZIE

THE wartime newspaper, despite its attenuated form, eagerly devotes a large proportion of its limited space to photographic reproductions in the knowledge that where the…

Abstract

THE wartime newspaper, despite its attenuated form, eagerly devotes a large proportion of its limited space to photographic reproductions in the knowledge that where the average reader is concerned a picture will portray an event more graphically than any column of descriptive writing. This is not an outcome of the unusual conditions of war, but is the continuation of a process that has been in operation over a number of years.

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Library Review, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Eric De Banzie

To suggest in a literary journal that (say) Jack Hobbs at the Oval has given as great pleasure to humanity, both qualitative and quantitative, as Velasquez at the Prado…

Abstract

To suggest in a literary journal that (say) Jack Hobbs at the Oval has given as great pleasure to humanity, both qualitative and quantitative, as Velasquez at the Prado, approaches aesthetic heresy; and also opens up an interminable argument. Without entering upon the argument—which may be found in embryo in Professor Charles Richet's The Impotence of Man—I do venture to affirm that undue importance is attached by that section of the public which might be described as the cultured to the work of their kind. Particularly is this so in the sphere of literature. Those very people who wonder and scoff at the misdirected enthusiasm of the ball fan are themselves as prone to misdirected enthusiasm in the matter of the cult of letters.

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Frederick Niven

The Editor of Library Review has invited me to write an article on my literary beginnings. It is a task at one and the same time happy and—well, if not sad it does make…

Abstract

The Editor of Library Review has invited me to write an article on my literary beginnings. It is a task at one and the same time happy and—well, if not sad it does make one aware of how “the sunrise blooms and withers on the hill.” I might best begin with the return of my people from South America to Glasgow (beloved by them) where, I recall, I was long homesick for the land of my birth. Charles Darwin, visiting my native country, Chile, was impressed chiefly by its sunshine, the visibility there, the keen clarity of its atmosphere. Though in time I learned to love Glasgow it seemed, in comparison, smoky.

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

STANLEY SNAITH

THE assistant said, “Step this way, please.” A lift bore us with soundless urgency into the upper regions and decanted us into a corridor, and a moment later I was ushered…

Abstract

THE assistant said, “Step this way, please.” A lift bore us with soundless urgency into the upper regions and decanted us into a corridor, and a moment later I was ushered into the Librarian's office.

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Library Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

THEODORE BESTERMAN

IN my recent notes on “The Librarian's Tools” I glanced rapidly at the major types of reference works, mainly bibliographical, today available to the librarian and…

Abstract

IN my recent notes on “The Librarian's Tools” I glanced rapidly at the major types of reference works, mainly bibliographical, today available to the librarian and, through him, to the student and the general public. Any such survey shows that the field is a rich one, deserving of rather more thorough gleaning than it receives at many hands—and the more detailed the survey, the more impressive are the existing tools of the librarian found to be. It is therefore with deep admiration of the systematic bibliographer's laborious devotion, and in no carping spirit, that I point to the gaps which are also revealed by the same process of analysis. It is indeed paradoxical, but none the less true, that although the available facilities are great and insufficiently used, yet many additional bibliographies are needed, to say nothing of more general works of reference.

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Library Review, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Ivanhoe

The world grows steadily smaller, and affairs are now given as much prominence five thousand miles away from the scene of high incident as they are in places within easy…

Abstract

The world grows steadily smaller, and affairs are now given as much prominence five thousand miles away from the scene of high incident as they are in places within easy range. The fact has occurred to me with particular force lately when reflecting on the change that has taken place in the political contents of American newspapers. Even less than a score of years ago one might buy papers in Detroit or Chicago and hardly realise from them that Europe existed. The change has been quite sudden and remarkable. Now the foreign news services of the great American papers are regarded as of considerable importance by the managements.

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Library Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

W.B. CROWE

IF you are as tired hearing about the function of the library as we teacher‐librarians are of hearing about the function of the school I shall do well not to make any…

Abstract

IF you are as tired hearing about the function of the library as we teacher‐librarians are of hearing about the function of the school I shall do well not to make any reference to it: for it seems that if there is a wave of juvenile crime, the school is not fulfilling its function: if business men cannot get typists to add and spell accurately, the school is not fulfilling its function: if road accidents increase, if the churches are empty, if the landworkers are drifting to the towns—the school isn't fulfilling its function. Frankly, one looks forward to the time when with the help of the county libraries the school will begin to shoulder all its responsibilities!

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Library Review, vol. 7 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

W.C. BERWICK SAYERS

THE spirit of American librarianship is the admiration of the world. To some extent also the wonder, because the pioneers there were of the same substance in general as…

Abstract

THE spirit of American librarianship is the admiration of the world. To some extent also the wonder, because the pioneers there were of the same substance in general as those who founded Australia and New Zealand. Yet in the United States the “library idea” developed, slowly at first indeed as everywhere else, but in the nineties and the first decade of this century with a verve and liberality which outpaced us all; while, in our Dominions, it grew relatively much more slowly and always braked by the European idea that a lending library ought not to be free. A divided philosophy it seems. In America the axiom has been accepted that reading is culture and in it is included the culture of the imagination through works of all kinds, even fiction; and that this is to be dispensed, as education is, freely and at public cost. In continental Europe, and through it conveyed in some way to the Dominions, our axiom has been that reading may indeed be culture, but its relation to education is vague and unproven, and at the best the desire to create readers should stop short at offering them books for use in their homes entirely out of public funds.

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Library Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

I HAVE chosen as the title of this address “The Quality of the Library Service.” The title occurred to me while I was reading about the exploits of some airman or another…

Abstract

I HAVE chosen as the title of this address “The Quality of the Library Service.” The title occurred to me while I was reading about the exploits of some airman or another, who had succeeded in travelling from somewhere to somewhere else some seconds faster than anyone had ever done before. I thought of the motorist who boasted to a friend that on a certain trip he had touched 60 miles an hour and had saved seven minutes. His friend replied: “What did you do with those seven minutes?”

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Library Review, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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