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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Yun Zhan and Changjun Yi

This paper investigates the effect of business environment distance on innovation performance of emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) and explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the effect of business environment distance on innovation performance of emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) and explores the mediating effect of absorptive capacity between the two, and it further analyzes the moderating effect of skilled migrants in the relationship between business environment distance and absorptive capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical analysis based on a fixed effect model is conducted using data of Chinese MNEs listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock that expand into developed markets from 2011 to 2018.

Findings

The results suggest business environment distance positively affects the innovation performance of EMNEs, and can enhance innovation performance by affecting absorptive capacity of EMNEs. In addition, skilled migrants strengthen the relationship between business environment distance and absorptive capacity of EMNEs.

Practical implications

Chinese MNEs should fully exploit business environment distance to acquire the technology needed for innovation activities, and strengthen absorptive capacity to maximize the benefits from innovation. Chinese government needs to strengthen the construction of skilled migrants to facilitate knowledge and technology transfer.

Originality/value

Combining springboard theory and institutional theory, this paper integrates macro and micro perspectives to explore whether and how business environment distance affects innovation performance of Chinese MNEs. The paper provides a good theoretical basis and important practical reference value for enhancing the technological innovation capability of Chinese MNEs and the overall technological innovation level of China.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Katrin Held and Nicola Berg

In developed markets, emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) seem to be more discriminated by host country nationals than foreign developed market multinational…

Abstract

Purpose

In developed markets, emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) seem to be more discriminated by host country nationals than foreign developed market multinational enterprises (DMNEs). They are challenged with host country nationals’ prejudices and face a stigma of being from emerging markets. While literature agrees that EMNEs suffer from additional disadvantages due to their country-of-origin, research fails to identify those factors that may lead to a higher discrimination against EMNEs than against foreign DMNEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on institutional theory, we look at institutional-related and resource-related antecedents that have an impact on various forms of direct and indirect discrimination by host country nationals.

Originality/value

Our framework analyzes the crucial differences between host country nationals’ perception of EMNEs and foreign DMNEs and the resulting challenges for EMNEs in the developed world. It enhances our understanding of the importance of institutional environments in explaining differences in host country nationals’ discrimination against foreign MNEs.

Details

Multinational Enterprises, Markets and Institutional Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-421-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2015

Sumon Kumar Bhaumik, Nigel Driffield and Ying Zhou

The extant literature on emerging market multinationals (EMNEs) suggest that they derive their advantages from factors such as economies of scale, and that they…

Abstract

The extant literature on emerging market multinationals (EMNEs) suggest that they derive their advantages from factors such as economies of scale, and that they internationalise, in large measure, to access technology. However, support for this framework typically comes from analysis of static data, comparing EMNEs and OECD MNEs at a point in time. Little attention is paid to their development paths in a dynamic setting. We examine these propositions directly using an approach that enables us to decompose productivity growth of firms into its components, namely, changes in scale economies, technological progress and technical efficiency. We compare Chinese MNEs with their non-MNE domestic counterparts and developed country MNEs that have operations in China. We demonstrate that Chinese MNEs continue to derive much of their productivity growth from changes in scale economies, while developed country MNEs continue to have an advantage with respect to technical progress. Both these types of MNEs have a significant advantage over Chinese non-MNE domestic firms.

Details

Emerging Economies and Multinational Enterprises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-740-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Bent Petersen and Rene E. Seifert

The chapter provides an economic explanation and perspectivation of strategic asset seeking of multinational enterprises from emerging economies (EMNEs) as a prominent…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter provides an economic explanation and perspectivation of strategic asset seeking of multinational enterprises from emerging economies (EMNEs) as a prominent feature of today’s global economy.

Approach

The authors apply and extend the “springboard perspective.” This perspective submits that EMNEs acquire strategic assets in developed markets primarily for use in their home markets.

Findings

The authors succumb that the springboard perspective is alluring theoretically as well as empirically as it suggests that when EMNEs acquire strategic assets, they experience liabilities of foreignness (LOF) that are low relative to those of MNEs from developed markets. The authors concede to this LOF asymmetry but also point out that liabilities of outsidership (LOO) can offset or weaken the home-market advantage of some EMNEs when competing with MNEs.

Research implications

LOO appears as the more relevant concept to use when explaining strategic asset seeking of EMNEs. A set of propositions are formulated to guide empirical testing.

Originality/value

The insights gained from using the springboard perspective and the LOO concept are non-trivial: They basically predict future dominance of ‘insider’ EMNEs at the expense of MNEs from developed markets.

Details

Multinational Enterprises, Markets and Institutional Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-421-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Stéphane J.G. Girod and Joshua B. Bellin

Using Triad-based multinational enterprises as their empirical setting, influential scholars in international management uncovered key organizational characteristics…

Abstract

Using Triad-based multinational enterprises as their empirical setting, influential scholars in international management uncovered key organizational characteristics needed to create globally integrated and locally responsive multinationals. They proposed a “modern” theory of multinationals' organization (Hedlund, 1994). But recently, a new generation of multinationals from emerging markets has appeared. Little is known about their organizational choices and some scholars even doubt that they leverage organizational capabilities altogether. Does the “modern” theory still hold in their case? This exploratory study of three emerging-market multinationals (EMNEs) discloses that for reasons related to their origin in emerging economies and to the competitive specificities of these economies, EMNEs approach the global and local conundrum in ways which are both similar – and vastly different – from recommendations of the “modern” theory. We inductively develop a new theory that accounts for the evolution of organizational capabilities in EMNEs to reconcile global integration and local responsiveness. We discuss its implications for the executives of both emerging and Triad-based multinationals.

Details

The Future of Foreign Direct Investment and the Multinational Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-555-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Liang Wang, Zaiyang Xie, Hongjuan Zhang, Xiaohua Yang and Justin Tan

The literature on how emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) overcome the liability of emergingness/origin has sidestepped a prerequisite for any efforts to…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on how emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) overcome the liability of emergingness/origin has sidestepped a prerequisite for any efforts to overcome liability, namely, corporate compliance. The authors argue that EMNEs build corporate compliance capability as a knowledge-based firm-specific advantage (FSA) to adapt to institutional norms in advanced economies. In this study, the authors empirically examine the intricate relationships between corporate compliance capability and performance in the US subsidiaries of Chinese firms.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors use survey data to empirically examine the intricate relationships between corporate compliance capability and performance in the US subsidiaries of Chinese firms.

Findings

The findings reveal a positive relationship between corporate compliance capability and subsidiary performance, as mediated by local financing.

Originality/value

The study suggests that corporate compliance capability helps a subsidiary gain legitimacy, which leads to local resource acquisition and utilization. Corporate compliance capability thus serves as a source of a knowledge-based FSA for EMNEs in developed economies.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Xinmin Peng, Keyi Fang and Martin Lockett

Emerging-market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) can choose focused or ambidextrous strategies to catch up with global market leaders through overseas foreign direct…

Abstract

Purpose

Emerging-market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) can choose focused or ambidextrous strategies to catch up with global market leaders through overseas foreign direct investment (OFDI). The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), launched by the Chinese government in 2013, had a profound impact on Chinese multinational enterprises’ international behavior. This paper analyses how EMNEs select focused or ambidextrous catch-up strategies before and after the BRI, integrating ambidexterity and catch-up theories to provide a more nuanced understanding of the evolution of EMNE strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is well suited for deriving rich descriptions of empirical phenomena for which little theory exists. Because the existing literature has not yet fully explored and conceptually modeled the influence of windows of opportunity on international catch-up strategies, we use qualitative research to explore the mechanisms of strategy evolution in EMNEs.

Findings

The results show that the choice of catch-up strategy is influenced by the nature of windows of opportunity and the firm's accumulated technological capability. Specifically, the opening of institutional windows as a result of the BRI could give significant momentum to the international catch-up process by providing incentives and opportunities for EMNEs to enter more markets and new technology fields. The EMNEs studied underwent a transition from a focused strategy in the catch-up stage to an ambidextrous strategy in the beyond catch-up stage.

Originality/value

These conclusions can not only deepen our understanding of the dynamics of catch-up strategies in the global context but also enrich the research on the ambidexterity of EMNEs, especially in the context of the BRI.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Changjun Yi, Yun Zhan, Jipeng Zhang and Xiaoyang Zhao

This study investigates the effect of ownership structure – ownership concentration and firm ownership – on outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) by emerging market…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the effect of ownership structure – ownership concentration and firm ownership – on outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) by emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs), and further explores the moderating effects of international experience and migrant networks on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data of Chinese MNEs listed on Shenzhen and Shanghai stock exchanges between 2005 and 2016 are used. The empirical analysis is based on the negative binomial regression model.

Findings

The empirical results reveal a significant inverted-U relationship between ownership concentration and OFDI by EMNEs. State ownership is found to have a positive effect on OFDI by EMNEs. Both international experience and migrant networks strengthen the inverted-U relationship between ownership concentration and OFDI as well as the positive effect of state ownership on OFDI by EMNEs.

Practical implications

EMNEs need to maintain a moderate ownership concentration when conducting OFDI, and they are supposed to make full use of their own international experience and focus on migrant networks of the host country. Policy-makers in emerging economies need to better create a fair business environment for enterprises.

Originality/value

Combining agency theory and the resource-based view, this study integrates ownership structure, firm-level heterogeneous resources – international experience and country-level heterogeneous resources – migration networks into a framework to study OFDI by EMNEs, which expands the scope of research in international business.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Beatriz Domínguez, Lucio Fuentelsaz, Elisabet Garrido and Minerva González

Despite prior studies on cross-border acquisitions (CBAs) have analyzed the determinants of ownership strategies; there is still a quest for evidence on how the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite prior studies on cross-border acquisitions (CBAs) have analyzed the determinants of ownership strategies; there is still a quest for evidence on how the differences between home and host market characteristics affect the ownership percentage. Prior studies have acknowledged that entering host countries with greater uncertainty makes multinationals reluctant to acquire high levels of ownership. Nevertheless, emerging multinationals (EMNEs) are usually used to operating under greater levels of uncertainty than multinationals from advanced countries (AMNEs), which can imply different ownership strategies. The purpose of this study is to analyze the ownership percentage acquired by MNEs when designing a CBA in emerging or in advanced countries, and to analyze the extent to which the ownership strategy in emerging countries differs between EMNEs and AMNEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Mobile telecommunications industry is used as research setting to provide empirical evidence of the interaction effect of the advanced versus emerging nature of the host and home countries on the ownership acquired in CBAs.

Findings

Results confirm that both home and host countries' characteristics are relevant in explaining the ownership strategies of MNEs.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the strategy and IB literatures by providing empirical evidence on the recent debate on whether the internationalization strategies followed by EMNEs are similar to the traditional patterns of AMNEs, and analyze how EMNEs differ from AMNEs in their ownership strategies in emerging countries. Focusing in the mobile telecommunications industry, the authors also contribute by extending the analysis to an international and cross-cultural setting that includes 48 mobile groups that come from 35 home and 81 host countries.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Yanze Liang, Axèle Giroud and Asmund Rygh

Emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) have consolidated their global presence recently, challenging existing international business (IB) theories. One of their…

Abstract

Purpose

Emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) have consolidated their global presence recently, challenging existing international business (IB) theories. One of their most significant characteristics has been the prevalence of strategic asset-seeking (SAS) mergers and acquisitions (M&As) targeting firms in developed countries. Such SAS M&As have been ascribed to the aim of acquiring or augmenting firm-specific advantages, rather than exploiting existing advantages. A literature review is needed to synthesize the growing number of academic studies and to contribute to ongoing theoretical developments on EMNEs' catch-up strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors follow a standard systematic literature review approach. The authors collate academic studies on EMNEs' SAS M&As in developed markets published between 2000 and mid-2020, structuring the analysis using the logic of antecedent, process and performance outcomes.

Findings

The authors present recent research trends in terms of year, journal, theories and methods. The authors synthesize and analyze existing knowledge on EMNEs' SAS M&As and identify remaining gaps to suggest future research directions.

Originality/value

The review contributes by focusing on the key argument of current EMNE research – SAS M&As. By providing the first focused review on this topic, it provides a basis for further research on EMNEs' SAS M&As.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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