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Article

Jill Hooks and Nitha Palakshappa

The purpose of this paper is to use the New Zealand electricity industry as a case study to describe and understand the importance of collaborative relationships in coping…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the New Zealand electricity industry as a case study to describe and understand the importance of collaborative relationships in coping with the changes faced by sectors of the industry over the last two decades.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method qualitative approach is used to investigate the nature of industry relationships. Data were collected through two‐phase in‐depth interviews with key electricity employees. Secondary documents and archival records were used to support participant contributions.

Findings

The research finds that the majority of the collaborative relationships in the New Zealand electricity industry are “forced”. Nevertheless, and despite the preclusions of competition, relationships continue to support the strategic imperatives of firms and form an important component of firm‐level operation.

Originality/value

The study provides an understanding of collaboration within a new contextual setting – the New Zealand electricity industry. To the best of one's knowledge, no other study has attempted to assess the importance of collaboration on these industry players. The qualitative analysis undertaken made it possible to discover insights that would not have emerged from more commonly used quantitative methodologies.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article

Supannika Wattana and Deepak Sharma

In the early 1990s, the Thai government initiated a process of reform of the electricity industry with the argument that such reform would improve the performance of the…

Abstract

Purpose

In the early 1990s, the Thai government initiated a process of reform of the electricity industry with the argument that such reform would improve the performance of the industry and contribute to enhancing the overall economic prosperity. The purpose of this paper is to examine the veracity of this argument by analysing both the technical and environmental performance of the Thai electricity industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A data envelopment analysis‐based methodology is employed in this study to measure the productivity of the Thai electricity industry, for the period 1980‐2006. This method enables the decomposition of productivity changes into technical and efficiency changes, and hence enables one to determine if changes in productivity are due to electricity reform (efficiency gains) or due to autonomous technological improvements.

Findings

The study reveals that the increase in the productivity of the Thai electricity industry over the period 1980‐2006 was mainly driven by technological improvements and that industry reform has had insignificant impact on productivity. Further, the impacts of electricity reform on the environment appear to be relatively modest – this too was driven by government regulation that supports the use of less environmentally detrimental fuels for electricity generation by the private producers, rather than electricity reform.

Originality/value

The analysis in this paper contributes to the literature on productivity and efficiency, by applying the DEA method to a time series data for a single industry. Additionally, the analysis of environmental performance of the Thai electricity industry – to the best of knowledge of the authors – is the first of its kind for the Thai electricity industry.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Energy Security in Times of Economic Transition: Lessons from China
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-465-4

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Article

Liz Warren, Martin Quinn and Gerhard Kristandl

This paper aims to explore the increasing role of financialisation on investment decisions in the power generation industry in Great Britain (GB). Such decisions affect…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the increasing role of financialisation on investment decisions in the power generation industry in Great Britain (GB). Such decisions affect society, and the relative role of financialisation in these macro-levels decisions has not been explored from a historical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on historical material and interview data. Specifically, we use an approach inspired by institutional sociology drawing on elements of Scott’s (2014) pillars of institutions. Applying concepts stemming from regulative and normative pressures, we explore changes in investments over the analysis period to determine forces which institutionalised practices – such as accounting – into investment in power generation.

Findings

Investments in electricity generation have different levels of public and private participation. However, the common logics that underpin such investment practices provide an important understanding of political-economics and institutional change in the UK. Thus, the heightened use of accounting in investment has been, to some extent, a contributory factor to the power supply problems now faced by the British public.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to prior literature on the effects of financialisation on society, adding power generation/energy supply to the many societal level issues already explored. It also provides brief but unique insights into the changing nature of the role of accounting in an industry sector over an extended timeframe.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article

Chi‐nien Chung

In this paper, I demonstrate an alternative explanation to the development of the American electricity industry. I propose a social embeddedness approach (Granovetter…

Abstract

In this paper, I demonstrate an alternative explanation to the development of the American electricity industry. I propose a social embeddedness approach (Granovetter, 1985, 1992) to interpret why the American electricity industry appears the way it does today, and start by addressing the following questions: Why is the generating dynamo located in well‐connected central stations rather than in isolated stations? Why does not every manufacturing firm, hospital, school, or even household operate its own generating equipment? Why do we use incandescent lamps rather than arc lamps or gas lamps for lighting? At the end of the nineteenth century, the first era of the electricity industry, all these technical as well as organizational forms were indeed possible alternatives. The centralized systems we see today comprise integrated, urban, central station firms which produce and sell electricity to users within a monopolized territory. Yet there were visions of a more decentralized electricity industry. For instance, a geographically decentralized system might have dispersed small systems based around an isolated or neighborhood generating dynamo; or a functionally decentralized system which included firms solely generating and transmitting the power, and selling the power to locally‐owned distribution firms (McGuire, Granovetter, and Schwartz, forthcoming). Similarly, the incandescent lamp was not the only illuminating device available at that time. The arc lamp was more suitable for large‐space lighting than incandescent lamps; and the second‐generation gas lamp ‐ Welsbach mantle lamp ‐ was much cheaper than the incandescent electric light and nearly as good in quality (Passer, 1953:196–197).

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Catherine M. Price

Presents a detailed report on pricing in the gas, electricity and telephone industries in the UK. Reports that all three utilities have to balance their commercial…

Abstract

Presents a detailed report on pricing in the gas, electricity and telephone industries in the UK. Reports that all three utilities have to balance their commercial operations, sensible use of their resource and political obligations imposed by the Government.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Hannu Makkonen, Sini Nordberg-Davies and Rami Olkkonen

The article aims to further understanding of purchasing practices in post-outsourcing buyer–supplier relationships, and it provides a holistic approach and…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to further understanding of purchasing practices in post-outsourcing buyer–supplier relationships, and it provides a holistic approach and onceptualizations with which to balance the perspectives of purchasing as an intra-firm operational function and as a strategic activity embedded in relationship and network management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on an inductive-oriented case study. The data comprised 61 thematic interviews conducted at 17 buyer companies (electricity distribution companies), 11 service supplier companies and six third-party organizations. The case features a setting in which a growing number of electricity distribution companies have outsourced operational functions regarding network construction, maintenance and fault repair and purchased these services from service suppliers representing a developing service market.

Findings

The study explicates the role of purchasing as an element with the most impact on post-outsourcing buyer–supplier relationship outcomes and development. The performance of the buyer–supplier relationship either accelerates or inhibits the new service supplier’s entry to the field and motivates or demotivates the electricity distribution companies to outsource their activities. This mechanism links to the respective development of supplier markets and buyer industry transformation.

Originality/value

The focal study provides a holistic approach and conceptualizations with which to balance the perspectives of purchasing as an intra-firm operational function and as a strategic activity embedded in relationship and network management. In particular, the study provides conceptual development on purchasing practices in post-outsourcing relationships and concrete managerial implications for dealing with such circumstances. The focal study includes case notes that facilitate using the study for teaching purposes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Philip Jones

The electrical industry must continue to play a positive role in industrial markets irrespective of whether general economic conditions are good or bad. The most economic…

Abstract

The electrical industry must continue to play a positive role in industrial markets irrespective of whether general economic conditions are good or bad. The most economic coal prices will need to be sought, adjustments to the changing social/economic conditions made so as to keep pace with the market, the marketing of electricity's technical benefits pursued vigorously and research and development into newly emerging areas (such as low‐energy housing) continued. Over the coming 20 years the aim should be to exploit opportunities presented by increases in the general level of economic activity, to look for openings for improved electricity sales and encourage development of sales opportunities in the new technologies.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 85 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

Suchismita Satapathy

– The purpose of this paper is to develop a new model – namely service quality enhancement – in the electricity utility sector of south India and to test this model's fitness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new model – namely service quality enhancement – in the electricity utility sector of south India and to test this model's fitness.

Design/methodology/approach

Effective customer satisfaction investigation is a very important precondition for a power supply enterprise to win in the market competition. The problems that need to be solved for the power supply enterprise are how to use advanced and practiced methods to evaluate electricity customer satisfaction, and how to use results of the evaluation to improve their service. Planning and operating modern electric power systems involves several interlinked and complex tasks. In this paper, structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to the electricity utility service model to verify service quality satisfaction. To determine the scope of the electricity industry and its relationship with overall service quality, a questionnaire-based survey was conducted and a standard questionnaire was designed for all customers in different groups of stakeholders (i.e. domestic, industrial, agricultural, public organization). To investigate the respondents’ perceptions regarding the service quality of the electricity utility industry, 200 questionnaires were sent, and from these 169 responses were collected, consisting of 53 responses from the domestic sector, 43 industrial, 30 agricultural, and the remaining 43 from public organization consumers. Then a model was constructed using SEM and tested by Amos 18 to verify the casual relationship between the measured dimensions and the electricity service quality.

Findings

The results indicate that electricity service has a direct relationship with the dimensions of reliability, tangibility, empathy responsiveness, assurance, security and stability.

Originality/value

In this era electricity is the vital need, but due to regular interruptions in the electricity service, customer dissatisfaction is the measured issue. At the current time, the Indian electricity utility sector enjoys a monopolistic business. Therefore, there is hardly any effort to improve the service quality in this sector due to a lack of administrative pressure and reformation measures. Indian electricity consumers face many quality-related problems as far as the distribution of electricity is concerned. In order to assess service quality in electricity distribution, a survey has been conducted in this work to extract quality constructs from a customer's perspective. One of the contributions of this work is that on the basis of results obtained from factor analysis of the survey data, an instrument has been proposed for the first time in the Indian context, consisting of seven dimensions (reliability, tangibility, empathy, responsiveness, assurance, security and stability). This instrument would help to measure the service quality of the Indian electricity utility sectors, and it provides insights for managers and administrators to set a service standard to fill the service gap. SEM is a tool is used for confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis. It is used to test and validate standard instruments. Through confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis using SEM, the proposed service quality model has been tested and validated for practical acceptance in Indian electricity industry.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Mika Goto and Toshiyuki Sueyoshi

The purpose of this study is to review the current status and related issues on the market reform of Japanese electric power industry after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the current status and related issues on the market reform of Japanese electric power industry after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster. We also discuss the future policy direction for the market reform.

Design/methodology/approach

This research compares the reform process of Japanese electric power industry with that of European Union (EU) nations. Then, this study discusses policy issues on the Japanese market reform based upon our comparative analysis.

Findings

Japan may learn many things from the market liberalization process and institution of EU nations. In the learning process, it is necessary to pay attention to industrial differences between Japan and the EU nations. Each country has its own unique features on fuel mix, business environment as well as supply and demand relationship. Such differences may influence a desirable policy direction for each nation’s market reform. The international comparison discussed in this study indicates the importance of a step-by-step approach in which Japan can gradually incorporate European experiences into the Japanese market reform.

Research limitations/implications

Since this study focuses upon the Japanese market reform, the empirical findings may have limited policy implications. The implications obtained from Japanese experience need additional thought in shifting them to other nations. Such an extension will be an important future task of this study.

Originality/value

This study discusses the current policy issues and future direction on the Japanese electricity market reform. This study also suggests its future direction. Previous research has never discussed the Japanese experience. Policy makers, corporate leaders, and individuals in the world, who are involved in the energy industry, have been paying attention to the Japanese future energy direction after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster. This study provides such a future energy direction on Japanese market reform from European experience.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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