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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Teresa Fernandes, Marta Morgado and Maria Antónia Rodrigues

Employees’ emotional competencies (EEC) are skills, based on emotional intelligence, used to perceive, understand and regulate customer emotions during a service…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees’ emotional competencies (EEC) are skills, based on emotional intelligence, used to perceive, understand and regulate customer emotions during a service encounter. In the context of service recovery, these skills are especially important and allow employees to influence consumers’ attitude and behaviours. The purpose of this study is to assess the direct and indirect impacts of EEC in post-recovery satisfaction, trust, word-of-mouth and repurchase intention, considering the moderating role of service (level of employee-customer contact) types.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 355 customers who experienced a service failure and subsequent recovery were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. EEC was specified as a formative construct, determined by its perceiving, understanding and regulating dimensions. To measure EEC and its impact on selected outcomes, PLS-SEM was used. A multi-group analysis was performed to analyse the moderating role of service type.

Findings

Results confirm EEC as a formative construct, with a positive direct impact on post-recovery satisfaction, particularly in high-contact customized services. Findings also reveal the mediating role of satisfaction on selected outcomes, and the significant direct impact of EEC on trust, even when controlling for satisfaction.

Originality/value

EEC remains unexplored in the service recovery literature, and most research fails to understand how EEC role may vary given contextual differences. This study adopts a consumer perspective of EEC in the emotionally charged situation of service recovery, considering the moderating role of service type. The authors further contribute to both literature streams while examining the impact of EEC on post-recovery evaluations. Companies should consider these findings in the recruitment and training of front-line employees to develop better service recovery strategies.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Cécile Delcourt, Dwayne D. Gremler, Fabrice De Zanet and Allard C.R. van Riel

Customers often experience negative emotions during service experiences. The ways that employees manage customers’ emotions and impressions about whether the service…

Abstract

Purpose

Customers often experience negative emotions during service experiences. The ways that employees manage customers’ emotions and impressions about whether the service provider is concerned for them in such emotionally charged service encounters (ECSEs) is crucial, considering the criticality of the encounter. Drawing on cognitive appraisal theory, this study proposes that two key competencies – employee emotional competence (EEC) and employee technical competence (ETC) – affect negative customer emotions and customer satisfaction with employee response in ECSEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on a video-based experiment that depicts a customer involved in an ECSE as a service provider delivers bad news to him. The hypothesis tests use a two-way independent analysis of covariance.

Findings

Both emotional and technical competencies must be displayed to improve the customer experience in an ECSE. When EEC is low, ETC does not decrease negative customer emotions or increase customer satisfaction with employee response. When EEC is high, ETC instead has a significant impact on both customer outcomes.

Practical implications

Managers must train employees to develop both technical and emotional competencies. Employees who demonstrate only one type cannot temper customers’ emotions or enhance their perceptions of the employees’ response as well as can those strong in both competencies.

Originality/value

Using a video-based experiment, this study examines the moderating role of EEC in the relationship between ETC and two key aspects of the customers’ experience in an ECSE (negative customer emotions and customer satisfaction with employee responses) following the delivery of bad news.

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Cécile Delcourt, Dwayne D. Gremler, Allard C.R. van Riel and Marcel van Birgelen

During service encounters, it has been suggested that emotionally competent employees are likely to succeed in building rapport with their customers, which in turn often…

Abstract

Purpose

During service encounters, it has been suggested that emotionally competent employees are likely to succeed in building rapport with their customers, which in turn often leads to customer satisfaction and loyalty. However, these relationships have not been empirically examined. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of customer perceived employee emotional competence (EEC) on satisfaction and loyalty. The paper also examines how and to what extent rapport mediates these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of affect‐as‐information, suggesting that emotions inform human behavior, the paper develops a structural model and tests it on a sample of 247 customers in a personal service setting.

Findings

Customer perceptions of EEC positively influence customer satisfaction and loyalty. Rapport partially mediates both effects.

Practical implications

The extent to which customers perceive employees as emotionally competent is related to the development of rapport, customer satisfaction, and loyalty. Managers of high‐contact services should therefore pay attention to emotional competence when hiring new employees, and/or encourage and train existing employees to develop this type of competence.

Originality/value

Previous studies have used employee self‐reports or supervisor reports of EEC, both of which have significant limitations when used in service encounters to predict customer outcomes. Furthermore, they essentially capture an employee's potential to behave in an emotionally competent way while service managers are interested in the actual display of emotionally competent behaviors as perceived by customers. Accordingly, to overcome these issues, this study adopts a customer perspective of EEC and uses customer perceptions of EEC to predict customer outcome.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Nicholas Perdikis

This article assesses the impact of Cyprus' agreement of association on the development and maintenance of trade with the EEC and Britain. It begins with a description of…

Abstract

This article assesses the impact of Cyprus' agreement of association on the development and maintenance of trade with the EEC and Britain. It begins with a description of Cyprus' economic and trading structure and the agreement of association. The analysis is carried out by examining the growth rates of trade to and from the EEC and Britain at an aggregate and disaggregated level. Comparisons are made between these and those for other Mediterranean and less‐developed countries. Ex‐post income elasticities are also examined in a similar way. The study concludes that the agreement hindered the development of trade between the EEC and Cyprus.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

JAMES LOVE and RICHARD DISNEY

The Convention signed at Lomé on 28 February 1975 between the nine members of the European Economic Community and forty‐six developing countries, known as the ACP States…

Abstract

The Convention signed at Lomé on 28 February 1975 between the nine members of the European Economic Community and forty‐six developing countries, known as the ACP States, has been hailed as an important advance in economic cooperation between rich and poor nations. Not only has the number of countries associated with the EEC been raised from the nineteen involved in the earlier Yaoundé Convention, but the ACP countries as a group now appear to enjoy more favourable provisions for trade and aid than those obtained under earlier agreements. Among the new ACP States is Ethiopia, a country neither connected with the EEC through previous arrangements nor having any historical links with Europe apart from a brief period of colonial rule by the Italians during 1936–41. The objective of this paper is to examine the implications of the provisions of the Lomé Convention in relation to Ethiopia. In addition to addressing the major question of local concern, i.e. whether or not Ethiopia is likely to benefit from association, a case study of this country is of more widespread interest. The lessons for Ethiopia may be applicable to other countries with similar circumstances. In addition, on the grounds of absolute poverty the Lomé Convention provides preferential treatment in some areas for certain of the least developed ACP countries, of which Ethiopia is one. The likely benefits of association for Ethiopia may serve, therefore, as an indicator of the extent of the EEC's commitment to assisting the ACP States, and the least developed in particular.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1980

J.R. Nicholls

Introduction Musschenbroek pointed out in early 1973 that the accession of the UK to the EEC represented a major change in the environment for the UK food and drink…

Abstract

Introduction Musschenbroek pointed out in early 1973 that the accession of the UK to the EEC represented a major change in the environment for the UK food and drink industry. UK firms would be subject to higher raw material prices, different sources of supply, new ingredient and packaging legislation, new laws about competition and fair trading, and of course the whole regime of the Common Agricultural Policy.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

Bernard Delagneau

Explores the impact of recent EEC legislation, in particular the implications of Article 85, plus its regulations, of the Treaty of Rome where arrangements for selective…

Abstract

Explores the impact of recent EEC legislation, in particular the implications of Article 85, plus its regulations, of the Treaty of Rome where arrangements for selective or exclusive dealing can only be exempted from prohibition when the economic importance of the agreement is minor, or when the arrangement results in economic or technical benefits for the consumers. States marketing executives have, therefore, to take note of both national and community legislation in EEC countries. Reports that recently, companies that market in the Common Market countries, have become more aware of the EEC Commission's policy against firms who restrict, to the consumer's detriment, competition. Sums up that the Commission has implemented policy to prohibit selective distribution from 1962 forwards – this can only be avoided when the economic importance of the agreement is minor, considering market share involved.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

These are the days of falling standards and sagging morale, nowhere more apparent than in the one‐time efficient public service. The division between management and…

Abstract

These are the days of falling standards and sagging morale, nowhere more apparent than in the one‐time efficient public service. The division between management and workers in the field in the large public enterprises has grown wider and wider and we tend to blame the lower strata of the structure for most of the ills which beset us, mainly because its failures are more obvious; here, the falling standards of work and care speak for themselves. The massive reorganization of the National Health Service and local authorities has made evident, especially in the first, that the upper strata of the colossi which dominate our everyday lives have their ills too. Local authorities have been told “The party is over!” and the National Health Service has been told of the urgent need for the strictest economy in administration; that the taking over of personal health services from local authorities was wrongly attributed to “managerial growth” instead of a mere “transfer of functions”, but, nonetheless, new authorities were created, each with fast‐growing administrative organs operating services—doctors, nurses and patients—which had remained unchanged. Very large local authorities, with many functions lost to others, one would have expected to have resulted in economy of administration, has all‐too‐often been the opposite. Hardly surprising that those who pay for it all, distinct from those who receive of its largesse, are being stirred to rebellion, when they have been overtaxed, ill‐used and what is more important, ignored for so long.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Mark Woolfe

Summarizes legislation which determines specific temperaturerequirements for refrigerated foods in the United Kingdom pre –and post‐1990. Before 1990 there were relatively…

Abstract

Summarizes legislation which determines specific temperature requirements for refrigerated foods in the United Kingdom pre – and post‐1990. Before 1990 there were relatively few specific national controls, although controls existed for certain animal‐based products such as meat and meat products destined for intra‐Community trade. Post‐1990 came the Food Safety Act 1990 and Food Hygiene (Amendment) Regulations 1990, which have had most effect on the chill chain from production through to retail sale, and in the catering sector. Temperature controls have been strengthened by monitoring and systems of record‐keeping. The other source of legislation has been through the implementation of single European market measures, many of which will come into force on 1 January 1993.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Walter B. Kleeman

Reports findings of a study of 15 countries on: the globalperspective; how office workers feel about their work; how officeworkers work; environmental, health and safety…

Abstract

Reports findings of a study of 15 countries on: the global perspective; how office workers feel about their work; how office workers work; environmental, health and safety issues; employee health concerns; how the physical environment supports the office worker; and how the professional office environment community responds.

Details

Facilities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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