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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Delphine Godefroit-Winkel, Marie Schill and Fatou Diop-Sall

This study identifies the impact of supermarket environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study identifies the impact of supermarket environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Based on the stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R), this study demonstrates how positive and negative emotions mediate the relationships between consumers’ perceptions of ECSR and consumers’ attitudes towards their supermarket. This study draws from cultural theory and works on sustainability and examines the moderating effect of the cultural context on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A supermarket intercept survey was conducted among 327 consumers in France and 444 consumers in Morocco. The proposed model was analysed using Amos 22.

Findings

ECSR’s impact on consumer loyalty varies across cultural contexts through the mediation of positive and negative emotions. The study also indicates how consumers’ levels of environmentalism moderate the direct effect of supermarket ECSR on consumers’ attitudes towards the supermarket.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the S-O-R and cultural theories, this study demonstrates how the dimensions of the cultural context moderate the direct and indirect effects of ECSR on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Specifically, favourable perceptions of supermarket ECSR have an ambivalent impact on consumers’ attitudes through the mediation of negative emotions, such as shame, in more collectivist, low uncertainty avoidance and short-term oriented countries.

Practical implications

Tailored recommendations for supermarket managers interested in ECSR and operating in an international context are provided.

Social implications

This research highlights the varying impacts of environmental actions in international retailing.

Originality/value

Using the S-O-R and cultural theories, this study reveals nuances to existing knowledge on the role of consumers’ emotions in international retailing. It reveals the salience of negative emotions after the perception of a positively valenced stimulus across distinct cultural contexts.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Andrew Ebekozien, Mohamad Shaharudin Samsurijan, Clinton Aigbavboa, Radin Badarudin Radin Firdaus, Noor Alyani Nor Azazi and Godpower C. Amadi

Funding infrastructural facilities of higher institutions, especially in some developing nations such as Nigeria, that is under-funded, is a challenge in the current era…

Abstract

Purpose

Funding infrastructural facilities of higher institutions, especially in some developing nations such as Nigeria, that is under-funded, is a challenge in the current era. Private organisations participation in infrastructure development via a proposed expanded corporate social responsibility (ECSR) may enhance infrastructural facilities provision. There is a paucity of literature regarding ECSR, a form of infrastructure tax relief providing infrastructural facilities for higher institutions. Therefore, the study investigated the role of private organisations via a proposed ECSR in the provision of infrastructure and proffer ways to enhance higher institutions' infrastructure development delivery in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study data were collated via face-to-face interviews and observation of existing buildings. From the six geo-political zones, two higher institutions each were selected for a good representation across Nigeria. Saturation was achieved with 26 participants interviewed. The emerged three main themes were analysed via thematic analysis.

Findings

Findings show inadequate infrastructure development in Nigerian higher institutions. Lack of policy and institutional framework, lax governance, level of transparency, and corruption, emerged as the key issues that may hinder private organisations from participating in public higher institutions infrastructure development delivery in Nigeria via ECSR. Others are lack of autonomy, inadequate planning, high level of impunity, political affiliation, poor management, and access to funding. The study proffers some recommendations based on these findings.

Research limitations/implications

This research is restricted to the role of private organisations via ECSR in infrastructure development (buildings) in Nigeria's public higher institutions. Future study is needed to validate the proposed ECSR framework in developing countries for the provision of buildings for higher institutions in their host communities.

Practical implications

The paper will advance the philosophy of corporate social responsibility to the provision of building facilities in host communities' higher institutions by private companies through tax relief and supported by a proposed Presidential Executive Order.

Originality/value

The proposed ECSR framework can be used to improve building facilities in Nigeria's higher institutions. This may assist and stir up policymakers to explore the proposed model and back up with an established policy such as infrastructure tax relief (ITR) for implementation.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Dang Manh Vu, Ngoc Thang Ha, Thi Viet Nga Ngo, Huong Thao Pham and Cong Doanh Duong

This study aims to integrate the perspective of consumer social responsibility with the theory of planned behavior to explore the impact of environmental corporate social…

1095

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to integrate the perspective of consumer social responsibility with the theory of planned behavior to explore the impact of environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) initiatives on intention to buy environmentally friendly products among Vietnamese consumers. Also, the moderating role of gender on the associations of antecedents and green purchase intention is tested in this study.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of 823 consumers using the tool of the mall-intercept survey recruited from several big cities in Vietnam. Cronbach’s alpha and confirmatory factor analysis has been used to test the reliability and validity of scales; then, structural equation modeling and PROCESS approach was used to test the fitness of the research model, formulated hypotheses and the indirect associations.

Findings

This study presented that ECSR initiatives were strongly and positively correlated with attitude towards green products, subjective norms, perceived behavioral and green purchase intention. Perceived behavioral control was found to be a partial mediator in the link between ECSR initiatives and intention to engage in pro-environmental consumption while the meditating roles of attitude towards green products and subjective norms in this linkage were not statistically significant. Additionally, this study illustrated that the impacts of subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and ECSR initiatives on green purchase intention were stronger for females than males.

Practical implications

This study provides several useful insights for policymakers and administrators to foster pro-environmental behavior of consumers as well as to inspire corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities of firms.

Originality/value

Even though there is a growing interest in investigating the impacts of CSR activities on consumers’ purchase behaviors, there is a lack of studies considering the aspect of consumer social responsibility on their sustainable consumption behavior. There is a need to enrich one’s knowledge about the effect of ECSR initiatives on consumer’ green purchase intention.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Priyanka Aggarwal and Reetesh K. Singh

This paper aims to examine whether and how internal and external typologies of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and employees’ CSR participation (CSRP) differentially…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether and how internal and external typologies of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and employees’ CSR participation (CSRP) differentially impact organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and turnover intentions (TI), mediated by meaningful work (MW) and affective commitment (AC) and moderated by CSR motive attributions.

Design/methodology/approach

Bootstrapped structural equation modeling using AMOS and mediation and moderation analysis using Hayes’ Process macro in SPSS are performed on a sample of 193 employees from diverse industries in India.

Findings

The CSR-work outcomes relationship is rather multifaceted. Internal CSR (ICSR) and CSRP directly promote the meaningfulness of work and AC. Further, all three kinds of CSR (ICSR, external CSR (ECSR) and CSRP) influence work behaviors (OCB and TI) sequentially via MW and AC. Intrinsic (extrinsic) CSR attributions strengthen (weaken) the positive effect of ECSR on MW. Nevertheless, the conditional indirect effects could not be established, warranting further investigation.

Practical implications

The management must elevate employees’ CSR awareness allowing them to partake in the planning and execution of CSR programs that are authentic, righteous and seamlessly unified with core business activities to nurture work meaningfulness and positive employee attitudes and behaviors.

Originality/value

This is the foremost study that involves a bibliometric analysis of employee-based CSR research and a systematic meta-analytic review of the relationship between CSR and meaningfulness from employees’ perspectives. The present study is novel as it divulges an integrative framework about how employees’ CSR perceptions, participation/volunteering and attributions collectively influence the work outcomes at three levels (namely, cognitive, attitudinal and behavioral), drawing on sensemaking, needs and justice-based views, social identity, social exchange and attribution theories. Thus, new nuances are added to extant micro-CSR literature.

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2021

Yeonsoo Kim and Nandini Bhalla

The study aims to examine the effects of proactive vs passive environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the context of small and medium size enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the effects of proactive vs passive environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the context of small and medium size enterprises (SMEs), factoring in the moderating effects of price and the mediating effects of company–consumer identification(C-C identification) on consumer responses.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment with general consumer samples was conducted. A randomized 2 (CSR levels: proactive CSR vs passive CSR) × 2 (price as a CSR trade-off: higher price vs lower price) full factorial design was used.

Findings

The study findings revealed that proactive environmental CSR not only engendered more positive C-C identification but also resulted in more favorable consumer attitudes, stronger supportive communication intent and purchase intent. In addition, when a company demonstrates proactive CSR, consumers' C-C identification is generally positive irrespective of price differences, and in turn, more positive reactions follow. When a company takes a passive approach and offers lower prices, respondents showed significantly less positive C-C identification, and less favorable responses. This indicates that passive environmental CSR programs can potentially backfire, especially when combined with lower prices. This study also shows the important mediating impact of C-C identification on consumer responses.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few to explore consumer perceptions of and reactions toward the food industry's environmental CSR programs by degree of CSR involvement and price differences in the context of SMEs. This study's findings provide useful information to SME managers and public relations practitioners who work closely with SMEs, allowing them to make informed strategic decisions, especially when they evaluate the extent of their company's commitment to environmentally proactive CSR practices and its communication to consumers.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2022

Xiaoping Liu and Hong He

Drawing on the stakeholder theory and stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R) model, this study examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the stakeholder theory and stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R) model, this study examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosures and users' knowledge-sharing behaviors on social media (SM). Two underlying mechanisms are used to explain the relationship between CSR disclosures and knowledge sharing, namely, CSR identification and content richness.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical analysis based on a negative binomial regression model is conducted using CSR data disclosed on corporate official Microblog in the past year on 30 companies with a high CSR development index in China.

Findings

CSR disclosures are positively related to users' knowledge-sharing behaviors, and this relationship is mediated by CSR identification. Content richness strengthens the positive relationship between CSR disclosures and users' CSR identification. User's retweeting behavior is positively related to commenting behavior.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to investigate the relationship between CSR disclosures and knowledge sharing on SM. The findings of this study can help companies formulate and implement effective CSR disclosure strategies to achieve sustainable development of companies.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Oluwasikemi Janet Taiwo, Babatunde Ayodeji Owowlabi, Yemisi Adedokun and Grace Ogundajo

This study aims to examine the effect of sustainability reporting on market value growth (MVG) of quoted companies in Nigeria. The corporate reporting system has evolved…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of sustainability reporting on market value growth (MVG) of quoted companies in Nigeria. The corporate reporting system has evolved, and this study examined how it influences the perception of investors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted an ex post facto research design with 167 listed firms as the population. A total of 28 quoted firms were chosen with the use of purposive sampling. Data from 2009 to 2018 were obtained from secondary sources. Content analysis was used as a tool to analyse the disclosures in sustainability reports. The model was estimated using pooled ordinary least square (multivariate regression). Company age and financial leverage were used as control variables.

Findings

This study found that the compliance level of the sampled firms with sustainability reporting requirements for the four dimensions are below average, and sustainability reporting does not have a significant effect on MVG with Prob. (F-stat) of 0.7212 > 0.05. Therefore, this study recommends that management should intensify efforts in ensuring maximum compliance with the sustainability reporting guideline of Global Reporting Initiative to reflect in their market value and ensure its growth.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the original idea of the authors, although references were made to previous related study but it is a unique research work of its own. The work contained in this paper (in full and part) has not been previously submitted to any other journal for publication.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 20 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2022

Susanne Rank

Employees as citizens and companies as part of our society have to deal with the implications of grand challenges such as the global climate change or the COVID-19…

Abstract

Employees as citizens and companies as part of our society have to deal with the implications of grand challenges such as the global climate change or the COVID-19 pandemic in this turbulent twenty-first century. Internal versus external Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) acquires an integrative element of sustainable business strategies. Human Resource Management (HRM) contributes by defining modern internal Workplace CSR concepts for supporting sustainable business strategies. The focus of the sustainable HRM strategy is the employees as the key asset of companies, applying especially to those who are particularly talented as future leadership successors and CSR ambassadors. On the basis of the current Green HRM and Workplace CSR review, theoretical and practical implications are concluded to foster Workplace CSR strategy as part of a modern working culture and an integrative HRM frame. The COVID-19 pandemic as an accelerator of Green and social transformation is also discussed in the context of this sustainable HRM framework.

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Muhammad Adeel Anjum, Ammarah Ahmed, Lin Zhang and Dilawar Khan Durrani

Although past research has looked into myriad consequences of workplace incivility, little attention has been paid to the effects of supervisor incivility (SI) on…

Abstract

Purpose

Although past research has looked into myriad consequences of workplace incivility, little attention has been paid to the effects of supervisor incivility (SI) on employees’ sense of vitality and their discretionary work effort (DWE). Moreover, the mechanisms that drive the harmful effects of SI remain largely unknown. The current study seeks to address these gaps in the literature. In particular, this study aims to examine how SI culminates in decreased DWE.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a cross-sectional survey design, data for this study were gathered from 151 employees of two large companies in the financial services sector of Pakistan. A number of analysis techniques (e.g. confirmatory factor analysis and bootstrapping) were used to analyze the data.

Findings

As predicted, SI was found to be negatively associated both with subordinates’ sense of vitality and DWE while vitality was found to be positively associated with DWE. Findings also indicated that one way in which SI negatively affects subordinates’ DWE is by decreasing their sense of vitality.

Practical implications

This study offers several useful implications for management practice in relation to preventing SI and mitigating its effects and bolstering employees’ sense of vitality.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this study is the first to unpack the relationship dynamics of SI, vitality and DWE, and to introduce a mechanism by which SI translates into reduced DWE.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Daina Mazutis

Over the last several decades, businesses have faced mounting pressures from diverse stakeholders to alter their corporate operations to become more socially and…

Abstract

Over the last several decades, businesses have faced mounting pressures from diverse stakeholders to alter their corporate operations to become more socially and environmentally responsible. In turn, many firms appear to have responded by implementing more sustainable practices — measuring, documenting, and publishing annual CSR or sustainability reports to showcase how they are addressing important issues in this area, including: resource stewardship, waste management, greenhouse gas emission reductions, fair and safe labor practices, amongst other stakeholder concerns. And yet, research in this domain has not yet systematically examined whether businesses have, on the whole, changed their practices in tandem with the important changes in its institutional context over time. Have corporate CSR initiatives, in fact, been growing over the last 25 years or has the increased attention to CSR actually been much ado about nothing? In this chapter, we review the empirical literature on CSR to uncover that common measures of CSR such as the KLD do not support the concept that CSR practices have increased substantively over the last 25 years. We supplement this historical review by modeling the growth curves of CSR implementation in practice and find that the pace of positive change has indeed been glacial. More alarmingly, we also look at corporate social irresponsibility (CSiR) and find that, contrary to expectations, businesses have become more, not less, irresponsible during this same time period. Implications of these findings for theory are presented as are suggestions for future research in this domain.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-260-0

Keywords

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