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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Radha Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to determine the cross‐cultural reliability and validity of the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI‐2) in a cross‐cultural context.

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3369

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the cross‐cultural reliability and validity of the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI‐2) in a cross‐cultural context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a competency‐based approach to social and emotional intelligence (EI), the paper presents data on Indian managers from the manufacturing and service industries collected using self‐report and multi‐rater assessments. Factor analysis explored the latent structure of social and emotional intelligence competencies on the Indian sample. Divergent validity was assessed using a Stress Personality test. Internal reliability of the ECI‐2 was also determined for a sample of 400 Indian managers.

Findings

A two‐factor structure has emerged in the cross‐cultural context similar to the latent structure of the construct explored by the test developers of the ECI‐2. However, six items did not have significant loading. ECI‐2 has been found to have statistically significant reliability coefficient and divergent validity with Stress Personality test on the Indian sample.

Research limitations/implications

The competency‐based approach to emotional and social intelligence, with a two‐factor structure, has found empirical evidence on the managerial sample in the Indian context. Future research can test this on other professional groups. Norms can be developed for various professional groups using a competency‐based framework of EI.

Practical implications

ECI‐2 can be used with modification based on the findings for talent management, employee development, counseling and succession planning for Indian managers.

Originality/value

Cross‐cultural validation, in the Indian context, of a competency‐based framework of emotional and social intelligence and its measure is useful for researchers and practitioners and for professional and leadership development of managers.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Mina Beigi and Melika Shirmohammadi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the possibility of developing emotional intelligence (EI) as conceptualized in Boyatzis et al.'s competency model.

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1910

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the possibility of developing emotional intelligence (EI) as conceptualized in Boyatzis et al.'s competency model.

Design/methodology/approach

Designing a context‐based EI training program, the study utilized a sample of 68 fully‐employed members of five branches of a public bank in Iran; each branch underwent an eight‐week (each session 120 minutes) EI training program. Pre‐ and post‐tests were conducted to assess EI development using emotional competence inventory (ECI‐2), a 360‐degree measurement tool.

Findings

Only one EI cluster out of four improved significantly and only some of the specific dimensions showed this significant improvement, while others did not have a clear change and even some self assessments deteriorated.

Research limitations/implications

Lack of a control group, small sample size, and short training program are the main limitations of this study.

Practical implications

Detailed explanation of the method could be a guide for service organizations that wish to improve EI.

Originality/value

Because of the lack of empirical studies in this field of research, the paper reports the results of a pre‐/post study on EI training and development and sets out to add to this narrow literature.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Laura Guillén Ramo

The concept “emotional intelligence” (EI) resonates in the business world and many authors have called for more research that clearly conceptualizes it. Within the…

Abstract

The concept “emotional intelligence” (EI) resonates in the business world and many authors have called for more research that clearly conceptualizes it. Within the controversy of defining EI, the behavioral approach, defining and measuring EI in terms of competencies, has not received much attention. The aim of the present chapter is threefold: (1) to propose a new structure of emotional and social competencies that is useful within organizational settings; (2) to discuss a comprehensive model of emotional competencies within organizational contexts that includes personality, emotional and social competencies, and performance; and finally (3) to draw its implications for practitioners.

Details

Emotions in Groups, Organizations and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-655-3

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Laura Guillén Ramo, Willem E. Saris and Richard E. Boyatzis

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this…

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2299

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this study: emotional and social competencies are positively and significantly related with job performance; and emotional and social competencies will be more successful in predicting performance than universal personality dimensions, like the Big Five personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the data of three medium‐sized Spanish organizations (n=223) that were involved in a competency management project based on emotional and social competencies. SPSS and structural modeling techniques available in the SEM program LISREL 8.51 software are used to enter the empirical analyses of the paper.

Findings

Results show that emotional competencies and personality traits are valuable predictors of job performance as measured by the nominations procedure in the study. In addition, competencies seem to be more powerful predictors of performance than global personality traits.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small.

Practical implications

The paper will provide reflective practitioners with useful conceptual and developmental handles for emotional competencies within organizations.

Originality/value

The paper helps to build a body of research that contributes to overcoming the paucity of evidence for the predictive validity of EI measures claimed by many authors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Elizabeth Stubbs Koman and Steven B. Wolff

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships among team leader emotional intelligence competencies, team level emotional intelligence, and team performance.

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16214

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships among team leader emotional intelligence competencies, team level emotional intelligence, and team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

It is argued here that the team leader's emotional intelligence (EI) will influence the development of group level emotional intelligence (GEI), which was measured by a team's emotionally competent group norms (ECGN). Second, it is hypothesized that the presence of ECGNs will positively influence group effectiveness. Data were collected from 422 respondents representing 81 teams in a military organization.

Findings

Results show that team leader emotional intelligence is significantly related to the presence of emotionally competent group norms on the teams they lead, and that emotionally competent group norms are related to team performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this research include a narrow sample with the teams not being highly interdependent.

Practical implications

This research provides implications for practice in three primary areas: development and sustainment of emotionally intelligent managers and leaders; development and sustainment of emotionally intelligent work groups; and establishment of organizational leaders at all levels to foster and support emotional competence throughout the organization.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the field by offering support for the effects the team leaders' emotional intelligence has on the teams they lead as well as by showing how team level emotional intelligence affects team performance. This study adds to the body of literature in what is considered a relatively new area of study. The four key contributions of this research are: this research shows that the leader's behaviors are important at the team level; this research further validates Wolff and Druskat's (forthcoming) ECGN theory by lending support for the ECGNs as well as offering alternative clustering ideas for the norms; ECGNs were shown to be related to performance; and lastly this research extends the knowledge base about emotions in groups.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Mina Beigi and Melika Shirmohammadi

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on: the EI of service providers; and the service quality…

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3953

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on: the EI of service providers; and the service quality provided by employees who have received such training.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees of five branches of a large public‐sector bank in Iran are randomly selected as the “treatment group” to undertake a tailored eight‐session EI training program, while employees of another homogenous sample of five branches are selected as the “control group” (involving no EI training). EI is measured by the ECI‐2 instrument before and after training. Two samples of customers (150 customers of the “treatment branches” and 150 customers of the “control branches”) are utilised to evaluate the perceived service quality of both groups of branches before the training and two months after the training.

Findings

One of four dimensions of EI (“relationship management”) is found to be enhanced by EI training. Moreover, the EI training program is shown to result in improved service quality in terms of both overall service quality and its four dimensions (“reliability”, “responsiveness”, “assurance”, and “empathy”).

Research limitations/implications

Operational constraints prevented a second assessment of the EI of employees in the control group. The post‐training evaluations had to be conducted shortly after the training finished, thus preventing an assessment of longer‐term effects.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to have undertaken empirical investigation of the effectiveness of EI training in a service setting.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Cary Cherniss, Laurence G. Grimm and Jim P. Liautaud

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership development program based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) principles…

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3447

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership development program based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) principles. The program utilized process‐designed training groups to help participants develop emotional and social competence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved 162 managers from nine different companies in a random assignment control group design. There were nine different groups with nine managers in each group. Each group was required to follow the identical process. Trained moderators led the groups during year 1, but during year 2 a group member served as moderator, with all new moderators committing to following the process. The outcome measure was the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI), a multi‐rater measure of social and emotional competencies associated with effective leadership. Outcome data were collected before the program started, one year later, and two years later.

Findings

Results indicated that after two years the intervention group had improved more than the controls on all ECI variables.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers recommendations for future research on the mechanisms underlying the process‐designed group strategy and contextual factors that optimize results.

Practical implications

The paper describes a leadership development strategy that appears to be more economical and consistent in its delivery than traditional approaches such as workshops or executive coaching.

Originality/value

Although ISO principles are utilized widely in the business world, this is the first study that has used this approach in the design and delivery of management development. Also, few evaluations of management development efforts utilize a random assignment control group design with pre‐ and post‐measures or examine the impact on emotional and social competence, as demonstrated in the workplace over such a long period of time.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Segundo Vito Aliaga Araujo and Scott N. Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of emotional and social competence (ESC) on job performance by considering self‐ratings and the ratings of others…

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1622

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of emotional and social competence (ESC) on job performance by considering self‐ratings and the ratings of others (supervisor, peer and subordinate) using a multisource feedback assessment of ESC.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilized the 2004‐2006 performance evaluations of 36 staff members of the Ilo Copper Refinery, owned by the Southern Peru Corporation. To assess ESC, the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI 2.0) was administered to the Ilo staff.

Findings

The study reinforces the importance of ESC to workplace performance and provides evidence of ESC's positive influence. The results reveal that 70 percent of the variance of working performance is explained linearly by the total average of ESC, with four significant competencies – self‐confidence, achievement orientation, optimism, and teamwork & collaboration – accounting for 63 percent of the variance.

Research limitations/implications

As an initial study in Peru, the authors had a small sample size. There is limited independence in the performance evaluations because the evaluators of performance were repeated in several cases. Job performance ratings were based on the following computerized objective assessment: use of abilities, work organization planning, interpersonal relations, results, initiative, aptitude to the work, and creativity.

Originality/value

The paper is aimed at improving understanding of the links between ESC and performance. It is the first study the authors are aware of to examine these relationships in a Peruvian organization. The approach used in this study contributes to and provides evidence of the importance of emotional competence in the workplace.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Osman Yildirim

This study aims at investigating emotional intelligence based on competencies for sales and IT people.

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2631

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating emotional intelligence based on competencies for sales and IT people.

Design/methodology/approach

A study was conducted on 111 employees of 12 firms from four different sectors in which firms benefited extensively from IT and sales activities.

Findings

Emotional Competency Inventory (ECI, 2.0) was used for assessing the participants' emotional competencies. Independent sample t‐test results showed that IT and sales employees were significantly different from each other in all main dimensions of ECI except for self‐management. Also two separate discriminant analyses were conducted in four dimensions of EI and all emotional competencies in order to determine the ones that discriminate two groups of employees. According to the results of the discriminant analysis in four dimensions of ECI, except self‐management, the other three dimensions had significant loads to discriminate all groups. However, on competency basis there was no dominant emotional competency that separated one group of employees from the other. The results showed that it was more meaningful to use clusters of competencies for constructing competency models of these two positions than to use single competencies.

Research limitations/implications

Further researches should investigate different positions rather than sales and IT people. Also researches focusing on specific sectors can reveal more specific competency models.

Practical implications

Facts of the study showed that companies should consider differences depending on the tasks for their staff while designing training programs in terms of developing EI‐based competency. These programs for sales or IT people should focus on competency clusters rather than specific single competencies.

Originality/value

Increasing importance of emotional intelligence and its direct relationship to superior performance lead organizations to enhance their current employees' emotional intelligence and to hire new ones with higher emotional intelligence. This paper contributes to HR and training specialists by providing them with knowledge about how to use emotional competencies effectively in their applications.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Mingming Xiao, Shilong Zhang, Yanbing Tang, Zhongmao Lin and Jiahong Chen

This study aims to explore the effect of corrosion monitoring technology for ensuring concrete structure safety.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the effect of corrosion monitoring technology for ensuring concrete structure safety.

Design/methodology/approach

A new monitoring system scheme with unattended operation to evaluate the durability of concrete structures is presented, which includes four components, namely, a multi-function embedded sensor, a microprocessor data collecting module, a system data analysis and storage module, and a remote server module.

Findings

The system carries out monitoring of chloride ion concentration and pH in concrete, corrosion current density and of the self-corrosion potential of the reinforcing steel bar.

Originality/value

This system provides real-time, online, lossless monitoring for concrete structures.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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