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1 – 10 of 261
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Philippe Nemery, Alessio Ishizaka, Mauricio Camargo and Laure Morel

Most of the proposed decision aid methods provide the user only with a prescriptive approach (quantitative analysis) without any descriptive approach (qualitative…

Abstract

Purpose

Most of the proposed decision aid methods provide the user only with a prescriptive approach (quantitative analysis) without any descriptive approach (qualitative analysis). It is therefore not possible to justify and recommend ways of improvement. The purpose of this paper is to introduce visualization techniques to complement prescriptive approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Visual techniques have been developed for the FlowSort sorting method, namely the FS‐GAIA and stacked bar diagrams.

Findings

It is found that with visual techniques, fine details can be captured, e.g. detection of incomparability (with FS‐GAIA) and the composition of a score (with stacked bar diagrams).

Research limitations/implications

In the future, it is expected that other multi‐criteria decision methods will be complemented by prescriptive approaches.

Practical implications

A real case study is introduced in order to illustrate the practicality of the visual techniques. In this paper, the innovation performances of small and medium enterprises from the French Lorraine region are assessed.

Social implications

It is expected that the quality of the decisions taken are improved because of being better informed.

Originality/value

The paper, using a real case study, provides important new tools to enhance decision quality.

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Shaad Ahmad, Ahmad Abdullah and Faisal Talib

In a globalized environment, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are facing formidable challenges. Not only do they have to keep up their profitability, but there is also…

Abstract

Purpose

In a globalized environment, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are facing formidable challenges. Not only do they have to keep up their profitability, but there is also a pressure from various stakeholders to add to their environmental and quality performance .The solution obviously lies in continuously adopting and improving upon lean-green practices in their operations. This work aims at identifying, classifying and building up a duly tested robust ranked-order model of such “enablers”, related to lean-green practices, that puts them (the enablers) in an order of being the most significant to being the least significant further to be accorded the same or similar weight in strategy formulation and implementation stage by Indian SMEs for enhancing their overall organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study identifies 20 enablers (12 lean and 08 green manufacturing enablers) through extensive literature review and experts' opinion survey and classifies them into three main categories. The ranking and significance of each of the main and subcategory enablers is evaluated according to its weight which is determined by the best-worst method (BWM) approach, one of the novel multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods. Further, the results have been drawn after running accuracy check of the rankings (based upon optimal weights) and testing the robustness of the ranked-order model through sensitivity analysis.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that out of the three main category enablers, “operational performance enablers (E1)” and “quality performance enablers (E3)” are the most and the least significant enablers, while in the group of 20 subcategory enablers, “Kaizen (E17)” and “environment emission control (E28)” are the most and the least significant subcategory enablers, respectively.

Practical implications

The prioritization model or ranked-order model of the lean-green manufacturing enablers proposed through this study may serve as a standard model to managers to help them decide and allocate their efforts and resources accordingly in managing their operations. This will also help them adopt high-ranking lean-green manufacturing enablers in their firms and benchmark and standardize their existing practices accordingly, leading to greater competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The study identifies various green-lean manufacturing enablers in SMEs, classifies them into three main categories and ranks them using BWM approach. The findings of this study should be extremely relevant to managers, manufacturing engineers and practitioners in Indian SMEs from the perspective of developing deeper appreciation of these enablers as per their relative ranked importance to further formulating an effective and efficient strategy for their implementation resulting in optimal results.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Surajit Bag, Sunil Luthra, V.G. Venkatesh and Gunjan Yadav

Humanitarian supply chains (HSCs) by their very nature require urgent reaction to unforeseeable needs, making it difficult to properly plan for the support of actual…

Abstract

Purpose

Humanitarian supply chains (HSCs) by their very nature require urgent reaction to unforeseeable needs, making it difficult to properly plan for the support of actual demands. As such, integrating sustainability into traditional HSC practices continues to present a challenge to governments, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and other humanitarian-related agencies. This study focuses on identifying and categorizing the leading enablers to green humanitarian supply chains (GHSCs) and proposes a model for improving the responsiveness based upon a fuzzy total interpretive structural modelling approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) uses group decision-making to identify contextual relationships among each pair of enablers and elucidates the nature of each underlying relationship. The fuzzy TISM shows the level of strength (very high influence, high influence, low influence and very low influence) of each enabler in relation to other enablers, which can help to inform management decision-making.

Findings

GHSC management requires strategic planning of inventory and logistics management. The importance of collaborative relationship building with HSC partners for developing capability and the effective use of available resources are keys to success. These improved relationships also help to promote postponement and similar speculation-based logistics strategies, as well as advanced purchasing and pre-positioning strategies. Finally, the speed and quality of response is found to be the top enabler in GHSC management.

Research limitations/implications

One noted shortcoming of the chosen research method is its reliance on subjective expert judgement. However, collecting judgements is at the basis of many research methods, and the research team took utmost care throughout the research process to allay biases. Future empirical research can further examine the relationships suggested herein. Managers can use the model developed in this research to consider impactful ways to design and execute sustainable HSCs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is a novel attempt to identify enablers to GHSC management. Secondly, the research team has used an advanced methodology (fuzzy TISM) to develop the contextual inter-relationships among the enablers which has not been used earlier in this direction before and thus advances the GHSC literature.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Lisa Crona and Louise Brådvik

This study is a follow-up of inpatients diagnosed with severe depression/melancholia between 1956 and 1969. During this period, all inpatients at the Department of…

Abstract

This study is a follow-up of inpatients diagnosed with severe depression/melancholia between 1956 and 1969. During this period, all inpatients at the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Lund, were rated on a multidimensional diagnostic schedule on discharge. There were 471 patients born from 1920 onward. In the present follow-up, 2006 to 2010, 169 survivors could be traced. They were asked to participate in the study involving a telephone interview, in which a structured life chart was used. Of the patients contacted, 16 were ill or confused and 3 did not remember ever being depressed, leaving 150 who could participate. Seventy-five of these agreed to participate in the study. Long-term course of depression was evaluated by cluster analysis and compared to background variables, such as heredity for depression, perceived parental rearing behaviour, and treatment of index depressive episode. Using a cluster analysis the patients could be separated into six clusters describing the course: i) single or few episodes followed by long-lasting remission; ii) single or few episodes followed by long-lasting remission, although shorter; iii) single or few episodes followed by late recurrence; iv) single or few episodes, but more frequently ill, followed by late recurrence; v) several episodes followed by lasting remission; vi) chronic course of episodes. Remission or recurrence could therefore occur even after more than a decade. In summary, there was a short-term course with or without recurrence or a chronic course with or without late remission. Heredity for depression was significantly related to a chronic course with or without late remission.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Surabhi Verma and Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight about factors affecting Big Data Analytics (BDA) utilization and adoption in Indian firms. Research studies have so far…

3226

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight about factors affecting Big Data Analytics (BDA) utilization and adoption in Indian firms. Research studies have so far focused on BDA adoption in developed economies. This study examines the factors that influence BDA usage and adoption in the context of emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposed a theoretical model of factors influencing BDA utilization and adoption. Two independent research streams – first, the top managers’ perceived strategic value (PSV) in BDA and second, the factors that influence the adoption of BDA theoretically – have been integrated with the technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework. In the BDA context, there was a theoretical necessity to identify the driver and barriers of BDA from the TOE framework on PSV and adoption of BDA. A qualitative exploratory study using face-to-face semi-structured interviews was carried out to collect data from 22 different enterprises and service providers in India. India was selected as the context as it is one of the fastest growing large economies of the world with huge potential of BDA to improve the business landscape.

Findings

The results showed that the major reason behind BDA non-adoption is that the organizations did not realize the strategic value (SV) of BDA, and they were not ready to make the changes because of technological, organizational and environmental difficulties. The findings corroborate previous results about significant factors affecting IT adoption and implementation and provide new and interesting insights. The main factors identified as playing a significant role in organizations’ adoption of BDA were SV of BDA, complexity, compatibility, IT assets, top management support, organization data environment, perceived costs, external pressure and industry type.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation related to this study is the difficulty in generalizing the findings to a larger population of enterprises. To overcome this, a statistical survey has been planned to be conducted in the future.

Practical implications

The BDA adoption model in this study will have both managerial implications for practitioners in India, as well as those in other developing countries, and academic implications for researchers who are interested in BDA adoption in developing counties, in terms of formulating better strategies for BDA adoption. For managers, using the research model of this study could assist in increasing their understanding of why some organizations choose to adopt BDA, while similar ones facing similar conditions do not. Also, the understanding of the strategic utilization of BDA in different business processes may improve the adoption of BDA in organizations.

Originality/value

This paper contributes in exploring and enhancing the understanding of the factors affecting the utilization and adoption of BDA in organizations from an Indian perspective. This study is an attempt to develop and explore a BDA adoption model by the fusion of PSV and TOE framework. The effect of the three contexts of this framework (technological, organizational and environmental) on the strategic utilization of BDA has been studied for the first time.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Riddhi Rajendra Thavi, Vaibhav S. Narwane, Rujuta Hemal Jhaveri and Rakesh D. Raut

The paper focuses on reviewing and theorizing the factors that affect the adoption of cloud computing in the education sector narrowing the focus to developing countries…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper focuses on reviewing and theorizing the factors that affect the adoption of cloud computing in the education sector narrowing the focus to developing countries such as India.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an extensive literature survey, critical factors of cloud computing for education were identified. Further, the fuzzy DEMATEL approach was used to define their interrelationship and its cause and effect.

Findings

A total of 17 factors were identified for the study based on the literature survey and experts' input. These factors were classified as causes and effects and ranked and interrelated. “Required Learning Skills and Attitude,” “Lack of Infrastructure,” “Learners' Ability” and “Increased Investment” are found to be the most influential factors.

Practical implications

The resultant ranking factors can be used as a basis for managing the process of cloud adoption in several institutions. The study could guide academicians, policymakers and government authorities for the effective adoption of cloud computing in education.

Originality/value

The study investigates interdependency amongst the factors of cloud computing for education in context with developing economy. This is one of first study in higher education institutes of India.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 51 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Philip M. Clark

A spreadsheet program like Lotus 1–2–3 is perfect for computing an interrelated matrix of numbers, such as a salary schedule. It provides planners with the flexibility to…

Abstract

A spreadsheet program like Lotus 1–2–3 is perfect for computing an interrelated matrix of numbers, such as a salary schedule. It provides planners with the flexibility to conduct “what if …” analyses. In addition, its “lookup” function allows the planner to enter an employee's range and step and extract the relevant salary.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Milton Segal

Key audit matters (KAM) and their impact on the auditor is a relatively understudied area. The purpose of this study is to analyse whether auditors perceive that the…

2088

Abstract

Purpose

Key audit matters (KAM) and their impact on the auditor is a relatively understudied area. The purpose of this study is to analyse whether auditors perceive that the recent requirement for auditors of listed companies to report KAMs has enhanced the transparency of audit reports or not, what additional risks they now face, how the risk is being managed and its impact on the relationship with their clients.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an interpretive approach for detailed interviews with some of South Africa’s leading audit experts to highlight their perspective of the impact of KAM on audit reporting and the audit environment.

Findings

The experts have various perceptions of what makes a matter “key”. These vary from materiality, to subjectivity and difficulty, as well as incorporating a time-based consideration. Concerns identified include a significant increase in cost and an increase in potential liability, triggering the need for thorough internal risk management policies. The audit experts conclude that KAM has ultimately failed to achieve its goal of greater transparency, with clients virtually ignoring KAM reports.

Research limitations/implications

The research relies on a relatively small sample of subject experts and may not provide a complete account of the view of all audit professionals and KAM reports issued. It analyses the impact of KAM from the preparers’ perspective.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the research conducted in this topical area. Although there has been research on KAM focusing on pre-implementation consequences, there is virtually no formal academic research on the impact KAM has had on audit partners and firms in South Africa post implementation. It may also serve as a basis for the IAASB to consider going forward.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Fabiana Gondim Mariutti and Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi

The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to expand the understanding of brand equity for places (e.g. countries, regions or cities) and propose two frameworks to increase its value.

1659

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to expand the understanding of brand equity for places (e.g. countries, regions or cities) and propose two frameworks to increase its value.

Design/methodology/approach

By interviewing international participants, this study was exploratory and interpretative; thematic analysis was performed for a broader understanding about place brand equity.

Findings

The Roadmap of Brand Equity is provided by proposing three “pathways” founded on core value drivers as “road signs” (potential influences or main variables of the value of a place brand), which are required to be strategically monitored and aligned to place branding activities to enhance the value of a city, region or country. Value drivers of place brand equity and the roadmap of place brand equity are proposed through the figures.

Research limitations/implications

A natural progression of this study is the investigation of place brand equity by applying statistical procedures for measuring places. Due to specific locations’ (often) unfavorable and threatening reputations worldwide, the key value-drivers (government initiatives, stakeholders' perceptions, residents’ engagement, news media, social media and real data indexes) are noted as influential partakers – either separated or combined – when analyzing their brand equity.

Practical implications

Both proposed archetypes suggest applications for several co-creators involved in public or private places, which can be beneficial for both emerging and non-emerging countries, regions or cities. Furthermore, both may be applied to the analysis of other places (e.g. universities, schools, museums, public squares, airports, hospitals, etc.).

Social implications

This study may inspire planning and actions for public policies, including private partnerships, government initiatives and practical endeavors.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to perform an analysis of brand equity of places under a qualitative approach and to propose strategical frameworks for both research and practice.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Grace S. Walsh and James A. Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the processes that occur between entrepreneurs’ primary attribution for failure and the emergent learning dimensions from failure…

1546

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the processes that occur between entrepreneurs’ primary attribution for failure and the emergent learning dimensions from failure, in the context of regenerative failures.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focusses on 21 entrepreneurs operating in the producing services sector, a major subsector of the Irish Information and Communication Technology industry. All the entrepreneurs experienced business failure and subsequently re-entered the entrepreneurial sphere at a later date. A qualitative approach examines their attributions for failure, responses to failure, and learning dimensions from failure.

Findings

Regenerative entrepreneurs’ primary attributions for business failure are examined in detail; four types of failure attributions are uncovered – internal individual level; external firm level; external market level; and hybrid attributions. Entrepreneurs’ attributions impact their responses to the failure; this in turn affects entrepreneurial learning. When failure is primarily attributed to internal factors, the entrepreneur’s response is affective, leading to deep, personal learning about oneself. External attributions (both firm level and market level) result in a primarily behavioural response, with learning focussed on the venture, and networks and relationships. Those primarily attributing failure to hybrid factors have a largely cognitive response and they learn about venture management.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a retrospective analysis of business failure.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the growing literature on entrepreneurs’ attributions for business failure by focussing on regenerative failure; it links attributions to – responses to, and learning from, failure. The key contribution to knowledge emerges from the development of a model of the underlying processes affecting learning from failure for regenerative entrepreneurs. The research also establishes and identifies clear links between attributions, responses, and lessons learned in the context of regenerative failure.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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