Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

E.L. Johnston

AS the result of a considerable amount of investigation over a period of some months prior to the flight to Canada, six alternative routes were selected for the…

Abstract

AS the result of a considerable amount of investigation over a period of some months prior to the flight to Canada, six alternative routes were selected for the England‐Canada flight. These routes, in order from north to south, were:—

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Rachel Forgasz

In this chapter, I explore embodiment as a multi-modal pedagogy for teacher education. I begin with a theoretical exploration of the concepts of embodiment and embodied…

Abstract

In this chapter, I explore embodiment as a multi-modal pedagogy for teacher education. I begin with a theoretical exploration of the concepts of embodiment and embodied pedagogy across a range of cultural, philosophical and research traditions and their significance in considering powerful pedagogies for contemporary teacher education. I then go on to present a lived example of ‘the image of the images’ as a drama-based embodied pedagogy for pre-service teacher reflection. Drawing on my research in Australia with a group of pre-service teachers, I unpack the potential benefits of embodied reflection as a pedagogical strategy for engaging pre-service teachers in deep, collaborative reflection on learning to teach. Finally, I offer suggestions for adapting and applying this pedagogical approach across different teacher education contexts.

Details

International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part C)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-674-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mary B. Ritchie, Julie Blais, Adelle E. Forth and Angela S. Book

Recent research has suggested that a heightened sensitivity to nonverbal cues may give individuals with psychopathic traits an advantage when selecting potential victims…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research has suggested that a heightened sensitivity to nonverbal cues may give individuals with psychopathic traits an advantage when selecting potential victims. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of gender on the association between psychopathy and perceptions of vulnerability to violent victimization.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 291 undergraduate students viewed a series of eight videos depicting individual female targets walking down a hallway from behind. Participants rated each target’s vulnerability to violent victimization and provided a justification for each rating. In addition to these ratings, participants completed the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale.

Findings

A series of hierarchical linear regressions revealed gender differences in the association between psychopathy and accuracy. Among male observers, total psychopathy scores, Factor 2 psychopathy scores, and scores on the antisocial behavior facet were positively associated with accuracy in perceiving vulnerability to violent victimization. Conversely, no associations were identified between psychopathy (total, Factors, and facets) and accuracy among female observers. This suggests that the adept ability to accurately perceive nonverbal cues signalling vulnerability is specific to males exhibiting psychopathic traits.

Originality/value

The results of the current study highlight the importance of distinguishing male and female psychopathy in research and practice. Moreover, with an understanding of individual differences in the ability to accurately perceive nonverbal cues associated with vulnerability, we may begin to develop intervention strategies aimed at reducing future incidences of victimization.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

Interest in academic entrepreneurship is gaining attention as pressure on academic institutions to be more entrepreneurial increases. To date, emphasis has been on the…

Abstract

Interest in academic entrepreneurship is gaining attention as pressure on academic institutions to be more entrepreneurial increases. To date, emphasis has been on the transfer and commercialisation of research with little discussion focused on the entrepreneurial potential of university teaching. Drawing on Schumpeter’s theory of entrepreneurship, in particular the combining and recombining of resources and the concept of resistance, we provide an illustrative case study of one entrepreneurial academic venture that emerged from the teaching activities of a university. We examine how this venture, the ICEHOUSE, has evolved and been sustained despite pressure from competing logics from its partnering institutions. We argue that multiple and competing logics by various stakeholder groups led to ‘resistive tension’ which has supported the growth of the organisation.

Details

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-984-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Emily McKendry-Smith

The relationship between religious belief and spousal choice in Nepal is examined, looking at how the importance that individuals place on their own religious faith…

Abstract

The relationship between religious belief and spousal choice in Nepal is examined, looking at how the importance that individuals place on their own religious faith influences their decision either to allow their parents and other relatives to arrange a marriage for them or to initiate their own love marriage. How the importance attached to religious faith within the individual’s family and neighborhood affects this decision, and how education modifies the relationship between religion and spousal choice are also looked at.

Ordinary least squares regression models are used to examine the relationship between spousal choice and key independent variables. Interaction terms are used to examine how education may moderate the relationship between personal, family, and neighborhood religious salience and spousal choice.

It is found that the effect of one’s neighbors’ faith operates differently based on one’s own level of education. The “moral communities” thesis is used to theorize that in neighborhoods where religion is regarded as very important, individuals need to expend more effort to maintain respectability, adhering to tradition by having arranged marriages. In neighborhoods where religion is less important, the weaker demands made by the “moral community” render individuals more free to choose their own spouses. For highly educated individuals, the effect of their neighbors’ religious belief is considerably reduced.

As Nepalis become more educated, they not only move out of the sphere of family influence, as discussed in previous research, but also away from being influenced by their neighbors.

Details

Intimate Relationships and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-610-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

THE hull of R 100 is a sixteen‐sided polygon, measuring 709 ft. in length, with a maximum diameter, situated about two diameters, 266 ft., from the nose, of 133 ft., the…

Abstract

THE hull of R 100 is a sixteen‐sided polygon, measuring 709 ft. in length, with a maximum diameter, situated about two diameters, 266 ft., from the nose, of 133 ft., the height of the gas‐space within the framework being about 128 ft. at the maximum diameter. It is built up on a framework of 16 triangular longitudinals with 15 transverse frames, also triangular. No intermediate longitudinals or transverse rings are fitted. Along the centre runs an axial girder, taking the place of the wire rope used in Zeppelin construction, to which is brought the radial wiring forming the bulkhead between each of the gas‐bags. The gas capacity is 5,600,000 cub. ft., giving a gross lift of 160 tons. The transverse frames are not, as in R 101, of the “space frame” type, inherently stiff without bracing (in R 101 the triangular frames have a depth of 10 ft. 6 in.), but are only 2 ft. 6 in. deep, braced by the radial wiring. There are 15 gas‐bags, Nos. 14–15 being interconnected. In accordance with normal Zeppelin practice, automatic valves are fitted at the bottoms of the bags, discharging into fabric trunks leading to the upper surface. Hand‐operated valves are fitted at the top of 11 of the bags. Back as far as Frame 13 the axial girder is of triangular section, but from there aft it is square and forms an integral part of the cruciform fin structure. All girders, from which the longitudinals, transverse frames and axial girder are built up, are composed of Duralumin strip wound and riveted into tubes connected by stamped Duralumin bracing pieces.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 10 of over 9000