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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

E.D. McGarry

The purpose of this paper is to describe the founding and history of the Marketing Theory Seminar, often called Wroe Alderson's Seminar.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the founding and history of the Marketing Theory Seminar, often called Wroe Alderson's Seminar.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers personal reflections and historical narrative.

Findings

The Marketing Theory Seminar was considered by Wroe Alderson to be the crowning achievement of his career. This paper was presented at the time of Alderson's death in 1965 to memorialize his work on the Seminar. It documents the key participants and themes of the Seminars from their inception in 1951 through 1962.

Originality/value

This paper was presented at the Theory Seminar in 1965 by one of its founding organizers, Edmund McGarry, and has never been published. Copyright is held by the estate of the author. While we have been unable to contact any such persons, we have published the article with a view to bringing this important document to a wider audience. We welcome any communication from the holders of McGarry's estate.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1968

Martin Christopher, Jane Kirkland, John Jeffries and Richard Wilson

Describes the major influences directing the growth and development of marketing theory. Assesses the relative value of holistic and piecemeal approaches to this theory. Suggests…

Abstract

Describes the major influences directing the growth and development of marketing theory. Assesses the relative value of holistic and piecemeal approaches to this theory. Suggests that the most important advances in marketing management will stem from development of models of the market, advocating on piecemeal approach.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Howard Stanger

The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the causes of the failure of the Larkin Company (Buffalo, NY), once one of the nation's largest mail‐order houses in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the causes of the failure of the Larkin Company (Buffalo, NY), once one of the nation's largest mail‐order houses in the decades surrounding 1900.

Design/methodology/approach

Borrowing conceptual frameworks from both recent management and historical scholarship on organizational failure that integrates exogenous and endogenous factors, this study employs traditional historical methods to explain the causes of Larkin's failure. The main primary sources include the Larkin Company records, government documents, personal papers, trade journals, and other primary sources.

Findings

Begun as a modest soap manufacturer by John D. Larkin, in Buffalo, in 1875, the Larkin Company grew to become one of the largest mail‐order houses in the USA in the decades surrounding 1900 owing to its innovative direct marketing practices, called the “factory‐to‐family” plan, that relied on unpaid women to distribute its products. In 1918, anticipating the chain store boom, Larkin established two grocery store chains (other retail ventures followed). The company regularly lost money in these ventures and, combined with a shrinking mail‐order economy, struggled during the 1920s and 1930s, and eventually liquidated in 1941‐1942. A number of exogenous and endogenous factors, acting alone and in various combinations, proved too challenging to second‐ and third‐generation family members who ran the company after 1926.

Originality/value

This research paper tries to understand the decline of an important progressive firm during the interwar period. Whereas Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward were able to make the transition from mail order to stores, Larkin Company failed to navigate this transition successfully. It also adds to the small but important literature in management and business history on organizational failure and may serve as a cautionary tale for family businesses.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Archie B. Carroll and Jill A. Brown

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce and provide an overview of the topic of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The approach is to present an introduction to the…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce and provide an overview of the topic of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The approach is to present an introduction to the importance of the topic and a review of the concept’s evolution and development which includes an exploration of the topic’s meaning and competing and complementary frameworks which are related. Among these related concepts are the following: business ethics, stakeholder management, sustainability, corporate citizenship, creating shared value, conscious capitalism, and purpose-driven business. These concepts are frequently used interchangeably with CSR, and they have more in common than differences. At their core, each embraces value, balance, and accountability. The chapter also explores a number of key research avenues that are quite contemporary. Among these, the following topics are addressed: political CSR; the CSP–CFP relationship and business case for CSR; upstream/downstream CSR; CSR in emerging economies, corporate social activism, and corporate social irresponsibility. In the final analysis, it is argued that the topic of CSR continues to be on an upward and sustainable trajectory in both conceptual development and practice.

Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Abeer Salem

This chapter suggests a perspective on dealing with the future as dealing with uncertainty, which necessitates an alteration of the current learning paradigm and the adoption of a…

Abstract

This chapter suggests a perspective on dealing with the future as dealing with uncertainty, which necessitates an alteration of the current learning paradigm and the adoption of a model that, not only accommodates, but also anticipates and embraces diversity, variety, and differences in knowledge. It calls for a model that moves beyond pre-determined content and learned solutions to seeding creativity and cultivating improvization. It approaches education as lifelong learning, as necessarily transformative, creative and authentic. It posits that dealing with the uncertainties of the future requires the acquisition of skills of mitigation and improvization that anticipate, not only mitigate; but to acquire the ability to see and create opportunities out of uncertainty. It endeavors to explore the ways by which higher education can address the need for facing the uncertainties of the future and the complexity of the sustainability challenges.

Details

Introduction to Sustainable Development Leadership and Strategies in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-648-9

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Marian Konstantin Gatzweiler, Corinna Frey-Heger and Matteo Ronzani

In this article, we explore some of the barriers that prevent learning about grand challenges. By grand challenges, we refer to transformational social and environmental issues

Abstract

In this article, we explore some of the barriers that prevent learning about grand challenges. By grand challenges, we refer to transformational social and environmental issues and the critical barriers toward addressing them. Despite recent research contributions, initiatives, and calls for action to focus on such concerns, relatively little is known about the different barriers that hinder learning about grand challenges. To explore these issues, we draw from Rayner’s (2012) concept of uncomfortable knowledge, defined as knowledge that is disagreeable to organizations because it may challenge their value base, self-perception, organizing principles, or sources of legitimacy. Focusing on the example of recent programmatic attempts to advance “responsible education” in business schools, we identify three barriers to learning about grand challenges: Cognitive overload, emotional detachment, and organizational obliviousness. We conclude by outlining several implications on how to overcome these barriers, adding to recent academic and policy debates on how to make business school education more attuned to the transformational and social challenges of our time.

Details

Organizing for Societal Grand Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-829-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Göran Svensson

Generic deficiencies are identified in the theory generation of supply chain management (SCM). There is a crucial and challenging necessity to revise and extend the current theory…

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Abstract

Generic deficiencies are identified in the theory generation of supply chain management (SCM). There is a crucial and challenging necessity to revise and extend the current theory generation of SCM. There is a need to move from atomistic theory generation towards holistic and cross‐disciplinary theory generation beyond the traditional boundaries of SCM. The holistic theory generation of SCM should consider the dynamics between the point‐of‐origin and the point‐of‐final‐consumption in marketing channels. Furthermore, adequate cross‐disciplinary concepts and frameworks beyond the current theory generation of SCM should be considered, which so far mainly come from economics, engineering, operation management, production management, and logistics. The incorporation of generic marketing concepts and frameworks in the theory generation of SCM contribute to enhance the holistic and cross‐disciplinary theory generation of SCM beyond atomistic considerations, thus eliminating some of the deficiencies of the current theory generation of SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1978

John Gattorna

Channels of distribution are basic to the marketing strategies of firms, and have been shown to be a key element in the marketing mix. The author here undertakes a comprehensive…

1006

Abstract

Channels of distribution are basic to the marketing strategies of firms, and have been shown to be a key element in the marketing mix. The author here undertakes a comprehensive review of channels literature, primarily to identify and assess the adequacy of the various mainstream conceptual schemes which have emerged. Economic‐based arguments have largely been at the core of channels literature, although these have been partially offset by the concepts of the organisational and behavioural schools. The author concludes that whereas every conceptual approach reviewed has added something to our cumulative knowledge, no single approach has yet reached a point of adequate conceptualisation based on his own basic criteria. As yet channels literature is mainly descriptive, and has virtually no predictive power.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Göran Svensson

Explores and describes the close interrelationship between marketing and logistics, i.e. the marketing activities and the logistics activities in a marketing channel. The author…

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Abstract

Explores and describes the close interrelationship between marketing and logistics, i.e. the marketing activities and the logistics activities in a marketing channel. The author acknowledges that marketing and logistics were united in the beginning of the twentieth century, but that the two disciplines were in part separated from each other during the evolution of the last century. The topic is a business philosophy that may contribute to the re‐integration of the research disciplines. Usually, from a logistics perspective, the disciplines are treated as separate from each other, while from a marketing perspective the opposite is often acknowledged. In the 1980s, the potential re‐integration between the disciplines from a logistics perspective emerged through the business philosophy labeled as supply chain management (SCM). Both scholars and practitioners in the field of logistics have popularized this business philosophy in recent years. Argues that SCM contributes to the re‐integration of marketing issues in the field of logistics theory and practice.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Stanley C. Hollander

The purpose of this paper is to recount Stanley C. Hollander's own educational experiences and career paths. This is a reprint (with permission) of Stanley C. Hollander's article…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to recount Stanley C. Hollander's own educational experiences and career paths. This is a reprint (with permission) of Stanley C. Hollander's article which first appeared in the Journal of Macromarketing in 1995.

Design/methodology/approach

An autobiographical description of the author's early years.

Findings

The paper reveals many of Stanley C. Hollander's personal thoughts, reflections and some regrets.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable personal insights from the late Stanley C. Hollander.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 451