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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Neil A. Johnson and Edward A. Holdaway

The job satisfaction and effectiveness of principals, theeffectiveness of their schools, and relationships among those threevariables were investigated by questionnaires…

Abstract

The job satisfaction and effectiveness of principals, the effectiveness of their schools, and relationships among those three variables were investigated by questionnaires and interviews involving elementary school teachers, principals, and area superintendents in Alberta. Job satisfaction of principals was closely associated with the effect of the job on their personal lives, and it was highest in respect of working relationships with teachers and students. An appropriate school climate emerged as the most important and most effective individual aspect of the performance of schools, but a multidimensional perspective was supported. Effective principalship was seen to encompass many high priority areas, and principals′ overall effectiveness related most strongly to their decision‐making effectiveness. Principals′ job satisfaction was only weakly associated with the effectiveness of schools and principals, but the two effectiveness variables were significantly related. Teachers and area superintendents tended to rate the effectiveness of schools less positively than did principals.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Steve O. Michael, Edward A. Holdaway and James M. Small

Describes the perceptions of administrators of post‐secondaryinstitutions in Alberta with respect to various aspects of theresource‐environment of their institutions…

Abstract

Describes the perceptions of administrators of post‐secondary institutions in Alberta with respect to various aspects of the resource‐environment of their institutions. While administrators of post‐secondary institutions in Alberta are divided on the issue of government funding ideology, the vast majority of them agreed that the attitude of the government to funding was changing. Other problems of concern to these administrators include the lack of public awareness of the true situation in their institutions, the growing competition among post‐secondary institutions, and the unpredictable funding direction from the government. Recommends a clear funding direction with multi‐year budget plan and internal restructuring to prepare for an increasingly competitive environment.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

E.A. HOLDAWAY

This study was undertaken in 1971–72 to compare the proportions of staff in various types of positions in public K—12 education in two Australian states and two Canadian…

Abstract

This study was undertaken in 1971–72 to compare the proportions of staff in various types of positions in public K—12 education in two Australian states and two Canadian provinces. For reasons of accessibility of data, cost, travel time, and familiarity of the researcher with the systems, the Australian states of Victoria and Queensland and the Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia were selected as being representative of structurally “centralized” and “decentralized” educational systems. In addition, the study has as asociated objectives the comparison of (1) the proportions of salaries paid to personnel in various types of positions, and (2) the various administrative structures.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Edward Holdaway

Some of the most crucial current issues in educational managementare related to governance, effective schooling and performanceindicators, conditions of employment of…

Abstract

Some of the most crucial current issues in educational management are related to governance, effective schooling and performance indicators, conditions of employment of teachers, and in‐service education. For example, what different types of policy and operational decisions should be made by central, regional, and school bodies? What are the most important indicators of school performance that can be reliably assessed? How can we assure that teacher‐evaluation practices are conducted fairly and appropriately so that the interests of both teachers and students are served? How can schools effectively integrate their teaching and continual professional development activities so that minimal disruption occurs with student learning? These issues were identified during study leave in 1988‐89. Interviews were conducted with staff in universities, colleges, schools, government departments, research institutes, and local education authorities in several countries. The crucial nature of the issues was assessed by frequent attention to the intensity with which interviewees spoke about an issue, and the author′s subjective assessment.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

E.A. Holdaway

The 1988 Education Reform Act has profoundlyaffected the organisation of education in Englandand Wales. In common with changes in severalother jurisdictions, the power of…

Abstract

The 1988 Education Reform Act has profoundly affected the organisation of education in England and Wales. In common with changes in several other jurisdictions, the power of both the central government and the schools has been increased and that of the local authorities decreased. The major changes involve (a) introduction of local management of schools by school governing bodies; (b) introduction of both a national curriculum and a national scheme for assessment of pupils; (c) reduction of the operational role of local education authorities, which will become more involved in planning, policy making, and monitoring; (d) more parental choice of schools that their children attend; (e) the possibility that individual schools can apply directly for national funding; and (f) establishment of city technology colleges. Several implications of those changes are presented, together with positive and negative reactions. The applicability of some of those changes to other systems, especially in Canada, is discussed.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Donna M. Smith and Edward A. Holdaway

Explores the perceptions of junior high‐school principals aboutconstraints on their leadership effectiveness and the overalleffectiveness of their schools. Data were…

Abstract

Explores the perceptions of junior high‐school principals about constraints on their leadership effectiveness and the overall effectiveness of their schools. Data were collected in Alberta, Canada, using a questionnaire completed by 87 per cent of the 108 junior high principals and an interview conducted with ten principals. The most frequently listed constraints on leadership effectiveness were inadequate funding, time taken dealing with problem students, and inadequate physical facilities, while the most frequently listed constraints on school effectiveness were financial support by the province, financial support by the school system, and ineffective provincial leadership. Different perceptions of constraints on effectiveness were associated with selected demographic variables including the number of years served as principal and the number of years the school had been in operation. Several constraint‐resolution strategies were recommended by respondents, including redistribution of budget allocations.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Kenneth A. Leithwood, Paul T. Begley and J. Bradley Cousins

Growing appreciation for the potential impact of principals ontheir schools has stimulated a significant body of research concerningthe principalship. While many aspects…

Abstract

Growing appreciation for the potential impact of principals on their schools has stimulated a significant body of research concerning the principalship. While many aspects of the principalship have been the object of study, it is often difficult to determine the relationship among these studies and how these studies, as a whole, contribute to a better understanding of the principalship. It is also difficult to judge which aspects of the principalship would provide the most productive focus for subsequent research. The review reported in this article addressed both sets of difficulties by analysing a total of 135 empirical studies conducted between 1974 and 1988; 60 of these studies were reported between 1985 and 1988 and received more attention than the earlier 75. Results of the analysis identify aspects of the principalship about which much is known, approaches to research which appear to have exhausted their usefulness and areas in which further study seems likely to be of most value. One major conclusion from the analysis is that we know most about effective principal practices and least about how such practices develop.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

A. JOHN RENTOUL and BARRY J. FRASER

The School‐Level Environment Questionnaire (SLEQ) is a new instrument measuring teachers' perceptions of the following eight psychosocial dimensions of the environment of…

Abstract

The School‐Level Environment Questionnaire (SLEQ) is a new instrument measuring teachers' perceptions of the following eight psychosocial dimensions of the environment of primary or secondary schools: Affiliation, Student Supportiveness, Professional Interest, Achievement Orientation, Formalisation, Centralisation, Innovativeness and Resource Adequacy. Noteworthy features of the SLEQ are its consistence with the literature, coverage of Moos's three general categories for conceptualising all human environments, salience to practising teachers, specific relevance to schools, minimal overlap with classroom environment instruments, and economy. Administration of the SLEQ to two samples of 83 and 34 teachers, respectively, revealed that each seven‐item scale possessed satisfactory internal consistency and discriminant validity. Preliminary use of the SLEQ provided evidence of its usefulness in research into the effects of school‐level environment on classroom‐level environment and on teachers' pedagogical attitudes.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Ronit Bogler and Adam E. Nir

The paper aims to investigate the mediating effect of teacher empowerment on the relationship between teachers' perception of their school support and their intrinsic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate the mediating effect of teacher empowerment on the relationship between teachers' perception of their school support and their intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 2,565 teachers affiliated with 153 Israeli elementary schools. A path analysis procedure was employed to test the mediating effect of teacher empowerment on the relation between perceived organizational support and job satisfaction.

Findings

The results reveal that teacher empowerment mediated the relations between perceived organizational support and satisfaction, adding more than 30 per cent to the explained variance of each of the satisfaction types. Teacher empowerment shows different relationships when intrinsic versus extrinsic type of satisfaction is considered. The most influential dimension of empowerment predicting teacher intrinsic satisfaction is self‐efficacy, a psychologically oriented variable, while the most powerful dimension of empowerment predicting extrinsic job satisfaction is earned status and respect, a sociologically oriented variable.

Research limitations/implications

The results reinforce the notion that both types of job satisfaction are two different entities that should be addressed differently. Taking a theoretical perspective, it appears that teacher empowerment should be conceived as a multi‐dimensional scale, where its various components are differently associated with the two types of satisfaction.

Practical implications

Moreover, it seems that teacher empowerment has a much stronger impact on teacher satisfaction when it takes place in an organizational context that supports individuals. Hence, school leaders need to focus on different qualities of teacher empowerment, depending on the qualities of satisfaction that they wish to promote.

Originality/value

Little is known about perceived organizational support in the educational realm. Studying it in relation with teacher empowerment and job satisfaction, key concepts in the school arena, is unprecedented.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Abstract

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1410-2

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