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Book part
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Daniel Zdolšek, Vita Jagrič, Tjaša Štrukelj and Sabina Taškar Beloglavec

Purpose/Aim: Over the last quarter of a century, several voluntary frameworks and non-financial reporting standards have been developed by various initiatives and

Abstract

Purpose/Aim: Over the last quarter of a century, several voluntary frameworks and non-financial reporting standards have been developed by various initiatives and organisations. Especially after the 2008 financial crisis, which deepened into values crises, the need for evaluating social, environmental, and economic consequences and herein for non-financial disclosures accrued. This chapter aims to outline the current state in the ecosystem for non-financial reporting and its projected future developments and suggests further developments in this field. Since financial institutions played a negative role in the crises and will be important in future responsible investing, the authors also addressed some financial institutions’ specific non-financial issues.

Method: In search of an answer to our questions about whether existing non-financial reporting pronouncements meet (various) stakeholders’ expectations and whether international pronouncements are needed, we rely on triangulation. We start with the identification of phenomena of non-financial reporting. Description of phenomena is further on supplemented with a literate overview. Based on a review of prior research and study of the current framework’s pros and cons, we present a possible path of further development in non-financial reporting. Making that mixed-methodological approach is used (i.e. deductive and inductive reasoning).

Results/Findings: The authors deduce that there has been a substantial increase in demand for non-financial information, social responsibility ratings and other non-financial information services on behalf of preparers, users of such reports and the public. The authors particularly highlight the shortcomings that currently exist and outline the characteristics that future international non-financial reporting frameworks would have to meet with the awareness that such framework or standards will have their advantages and disadvantages. As seen by the authors, the main problem is how to achieve political consensus and then general acceptance by users.

Originality/Significance: The International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) Foundation has become active in the field of non-financial reporting and started a project to become an internationally recognised standard-setter. However, with many mandatory or voluntary initiatives being started in this field, IFRS Foundation will need to address many challenges and ambiguities to become a leading organisation in non-financial reporting. Therefore, the research question is whether a new board, comparable to the International Accounting Standards Board, with the straightforward task of setting non-financial reporting standards would be needed in the future.

Details

Managing Risk and Decision Making in Times of Economic Distress, Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-971-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

A. Kushelev, S. Polyschuk, E. Nedelko, D. Kozhevnikov and S. Pisarzhevsky

A new type of engine is proposed. The principle of the operation of this engine is as follows. The alternating electric current of high frequency flows from the…

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Abstract

A new type of engine is proposed. The principle of the operation of this engine is as follows. The alternating electric current of high frequency flows from the condenser over the vertical conductor of the cross and branches at its centre in three directions. The vertical current generates a magnetic field. The horizontal currents flow in counter‐directions; therefore their magnetic fields are mutually cancelled, but the side branches of the cross are subjected to the operation of the Ampere force (F) from the magnetic field of the vertical conductor. This force moves the engine forward.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Zlatko Nedelko and Vojko Potocan

The main purpose of this paper is to emphasize the role and importance of management innovativeness for development of innovative working and behavior of organization and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to emphasize the role and importance of management innovativeness for development of innovative working and behavior of organization and its employees.

Design/methodology/approach

General management literature quotes a plethora of reasons for the differences in organizations development level. Many theorists and practicians have unified opinion that the differences between low and high developed organizations are also due to the low innovativeness, i.e. the level of innovative working and behavior of all employees. This paper is based on the foundation that management attitudes towards innovativeness are crucial for increasing innovativeness in organization.

Findings

Increasing the level of innovativeness in an organization is importantly dependent upon appropriate working and behavior of management, which must create and maintain appropriate conditions for innovative working and behavior of organization as a whole and its employees. This contribution confirms that management readiness for innovating has a central role in organizations' shift from low to high innovative organizations.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive approach for considering the role of management innovativeness in low and high innovative organizations. Typical drivers of management innovativeness are outlined in framework of low and high innovative organizations. A framework for future empirical investigation is proposed.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Zlatko Nedelko, Matjaz Mulej and Vojko Potocan

The aim of this paper is to report about a requisitely holistic examination of the business ethics, focused on internal gaps between company’s and employees’ ethics…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report about a requisitely holistic examination of the business ethics, focused on internal gaps between company’s and employees’ ethics. Contribution considers reasons for emergence of business ethics’ internal gaps and their appearance forms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors specify and test model drawing upon modified versions of the ethics and management theory. In all, 1,125 responses were analyzed from an on-going survey conducted biannually among employees in Slovenian companies in the past decade.

Findings

Results reveal that company’s real business ethics remained steady over the decade, while employees’ real business ethics have significantly improved. Significant differences exist between employees’ and company’s real business ethics and shape internal business ethics’ incompatibilities. Finally, results reveal a significant influence of employees’ real business ethics on company’s real business ethics.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to postulated hypotheses, qualitative consideration of internal gaps of business ethics and quantitative analysis of business ethics’ development in the considered Slovenian companies in the past 10 years.

Practical implications

The authors rethought the habit of separated consideration of managerial business ethics and employees’ ethics as well as the presumption about congruence between company’s and employees’ business ethics. The requisitely holistic understanding and consideration of internal gaps of business ethics is suggested.

Originality/value

Available literature does not provide a similar model for a requisitely holistic consideration of internal gaps of business ethics. The study confirms the proposed model of business ethics gaps.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 06
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Marina Dabić, Vojko Potocan, Zlatko Nedelko and Tyler R. Morgan

In the global economy, managers of organizations are constantly innovating with their use of available supply chain management tools. Some tools, like strategic planning…

Abstract

Purpose

In the global economy, managers of organizations are constantly innovating with their use of available supply chain management tools. Some tools, like strategic planning and customer segmentation, have gained strong global acceptance while others are less universal. The paper aims to focus the contribution on the organizational factors that predict firm usage of supply chain management tools in two Eastern Europe countries, Slovenia and Croatia, while also comparing them to the global use of similar management tools.

Design/methodology/approach

This research provides an empirical analysis of supply chain management tool usage from a survey of 155 firms in Slovenia and 185 firms in Croatia while also comparing these findings to results from a global Bain & Company survey.

Findings

The 25 most commonly used supply chain management tools in the Eastern European survey were found to be relatively similar to those used across Europe and North America. However, further analysis of five selected tools reveals important differences. Evidence is found to support that particular organizational factors have a significant influence on supply chain management tool usage, of specific importance is the education level of the organization manager.

Originality/value

The findings are useful for business practice in understanding the influences of organizational factors on supply chain management tool usage. Also, the research is original as previous management literature has not provided a similar approach to researching management tools and their usage.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Vojko Potočan, Matjaž Mulej and Zlatko Nedelko

The purpose of this paper is to report about research how Society 5.0 balances Industry 4.0, responsible economic development and resolution of social problems by…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report about research how Society 5.0 balances Industry 4.0, responsible economic development and resolution of social problems by advancement of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from organization, sustainable development and social functionalism theories, the authors designed an integral model of CSR in line with goals of a forward-looking and socially responsible society. This study includes analyzing of present governing principles, multidisciplinary and multifunctional consideration and developing of integral framework for CSR in organizations.

Findings

This study’s findings suggest incorporation of technology in models of CSR, a regionally grounded solving of individuals’ social problems and changing of CSR’s environmental, social and economic dimensions according to circumstances of Society 5.0.

Practical implications

This study has created guidance for improvement of CSR practice in organizations through its responsible operating and behavior grounded on the governing environmental and social circumstances in modern society. It also revealed new possibilities for interest-based usage of human-centered society among individuals and organizations.

Originality/value

The reported study proposed an integral model of CSR for solving the main social problems with usage of advanced technologies in responsible economic growth founded on circumstances of Society 5.0, previously not considered in literature.

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2022

John K. Aderibigbe

Apparently, scholarly attention is shifting to Society 5.0. The study of Industry 4.0 (I4.0), including its impacts on industrial productions and services, is saturated…

Abstract

Apparently, scholarly attention is shifting to Society 5.0. The study of Industry 4.0 (I4.0), including its impacts on industrial productions and services, is saturated. However, there is a need for scientific investigations of the relatively new emerging concept of Society 5.0, especially regarding its relationship with I4.0. Given this necessity, the chapter conceptually examines Society 5.0 new normal and its antecedent – I4.0, with a value of the economically productive society in the post-coronavirus pandemic era. The chapter further elucidates the strategic role of emotional resilience and I4.0 collaborative partnership. Society 5.0 aims for a new society based on the notion of a human-centred economy and inclusivity. Consequently, new sets of innovative and artistic jobs will possibly emerge, driven by human competencies in collaboration with technology. In other words, Society 5.0 new normal is targeting a balanced or blended economic approach that favours a fit between society and industry and ensures that all citizens live a high-quality life by eliminating the delimiting effect of technology such as artificial intelligence (AI) on the physical space and wellbeing of the people. Hence, I4.0 collaborative partnership and emotional resilience are perceived as strategic and influential in achieving the feat of a Super Smart Society.

Details

Agile Management and VUCA-RR: Opportunities and Threats in Industry 4.0 towards Society 5.0
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-326-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Angel Cobo, Eliana Rocio Rocha and Marco Antonio Villamizar

Although R&D plays a crucial role in innovativeness and R&D expenditures is the most widely used tool to measure the level of innovativeness of companies, other variables…

Abstract

Purpose

Although R&D plays a crucial role in innovativeness and R&D expenditures is the most widely used tool to measure the level of innovativeness of companies, other variables and inputs may be equally interesting. The purpose of this paper is to define an innovative propensity index (IPI) which considers these variables and allows the identification of those companies which have a higher propensity to implement different types of innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking into account, the different criteria that may be considered in an IPI and that the perception of the relative importance of each criterion is subjective, the use of an innovativeness multicriteria decision methodology has been considered appropriate. In particular, an IPI is built from the weighting of the criteria through FAHP methodology. Data mining techniques are subsequently used to establish a non-supervised ranking (clustering) of a sample of firms, considering their IPI values.

Findings

The application of an IPI to a sample of 1,639 companies operating in different industrial sectors has helped us to find out that this index is useful for identifying those companies which really show an increased innovative capacity. A comparative analysis by sectors has shown that although there are companies from all sectors with a high innovative propensity, the proportion increases in more technological sectors. Moreover, it has been observed that in companies with higher net personnel expenses and high productivity level the innovative propensity is also higher.

Originality/value

The criteria used to build the index affects innovativeness individually, but the value of the analysis lies in its multicriteria approach and use of fuzzy logic. The validation of the index in a wide sample of firms is another outstanding aspect of the analysis.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Thomas Koerber and Holger Schiele

This research aims to investigate the impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic (C19, Corona) on trends of transcontinental sourcing as an extreme form of global sourcing…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate the impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic (C19, Corona) on trends of transcontinental sourcing as an extreme form of global sourcing. This study starts by observing that the sideward movement of international trade in the past decade can be differentiated into an increase in transcontinental sourcing and a relative decline of intra-EU sourcing. By differentiating between continental and transcontinental sourcing, this study gains insights into global sourcing trends and conducts a fine-grained analysis of the impact of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

After analysing Eurostat statistics, the authors conducted 21 semi-structured interviews with companies from multiple industry sectors affected by a high share of transcontinental suppliers. Using the Gioia method, data from the interviews were structured. By examining the identified motives, challenges and solutions, the authors analyse the impact of COVID-19 on transcontinental sourcing.

Findings

The COVID-19 pandemic seems not to represent a turning point stopping global sourcing. The authors did not find evidence for a trend reversal. Most of the interviewed companies share the opinion that transcontinental sourcing will remain important or slightly increase in the future. Based on the analysis of their specific motives for transcontinental sourcing, it became clear that factors supportive as well as detrimental to transcontinental sourcing are levelling each other out.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study explicitly differentiating between continental and transcontinental sourcing as different types of global sourcing. While in European sourcing, a decreasing trend is already evident, as shown by our data analysis, there is a lack of investigations addressing transcontinental sourcing. In this study, the authors concentrated on motives, challenges and solutions of transcontinental sourcing. Extending beyond the immediate COVID-19 impact assessment, findings suggest that purchasing would benefit from treating transcontinental, remote sourcing as a distinct process from continental sourcing, particularly intra-EU-sourcing.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Davide Di Fatta, Francesco Caputo and Gandolfo Dominici

Analyzing the entrepreneurial ecosystem related to the ARCA consortium, the purpose of this paper is to study the relationships among the start-up firms inside an incubator.

Abstract

Purpose

Analyzing the entrepreneurial ecosystem related to the ARCA consortium, the purpose of this paper is to study the relationships among the start-up firms inside an incubator.

Design/methodology/approach

Thanks to the adoption of the relationships concentric model and the density concentric model, the paper highlights the role of relational conditions for innovative projects in partnership among the incubated firms. Reflections herein are tested via a qualitative research approach based on a single case study: the ARCA consortium.

Findings

This research found that about 32 percent of relationships inside the incubator support the emergence of short-term relationships among the incubated firms. Furthermore, about 18 percent of the relationships support the emergence of strong collaborative strategies for the implementation of long-term relationships resulting in innovative pathways: innovative projects in partnership.

Originality/value

The most interconnected firms inside the incubator are those that play a central role also in the innovation pathway developing the higher number of innovative project in partnership. This finding emphasizes a correlation between collaborative relationships and innovation inside an incubator ecosystem.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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