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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Erika L. Bocknek, Marva L. Lewis and Hasti Ashtiani Raveau

Black fathers, and specifically fathers who identify as African American, represent a group of parents who are at once not well understood and pervasively stereotyped in…

Abstract

Black fathers, and specifically fathers who identify as African American, represent a group of parents who are at once not well understood and pervasively stereotyped in negative ways. In this chapter, we describe the risks and resilience of Black fathers and their children, with a special focus on mental health and coping with stress. We emphasize a cultural practices approach that takes into account both the risks specific to Black fathers’ capacity to parent their children and a theoretical foundation for understanding the inherent strengths of Black men and their families. Finally, we address the need for early childhood educators to partner with Black fathers as a means to best support children and their families.

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African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2021

A.Z. Zaher, Khalid K. Ali and Kh. S. Mekheimer

The study of the electro-osmotic forces (EOF) in the flow of the boundary layer has been a topic of interest in biomedical engineering and other engineering fields. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of the electro-osmotic forces (EOF) in the flow of the boundary layer has been a topic of interest in biomedical engineering and other engineering fields. The purpose of this paper is to develop an innovative mathematical model for electro-osmotic boundary layer flow. This type of fluid flow requires sophisticated mathematical models and numerical simulations.

Design/methodology/approach

The effect of EOF on the boundary layer Williamson fluid model containing a gyrotactic microorganism through a non-Darcian flow (Forchheimer model) is investigated. The problem is formulated mathematically by a system of non-linear partial differential equations (PDEs). By using suitable transformations, the PDEs system is transformed into a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations subjected to the appropriate boundary conditions. Those equations are solved numerically using the finite difference method.

Findings

The boundary layer velocity is lower in the case of non-Newtonian fluid when it is compared with that for a Newtonian fluid. The electro-osmotic parameter makes an increase in the velocity of the boundary layer. The boundary layer velocity is lower in the case of non-Darcian fluid when it is compared with Darcian fluid and as the Forchheimer parameter increases the behavior of the velocity becomes more closely. Entropy generation decays speedily far away from the wall and an opposite effect occurs on the Bejan number behavior.

Originality/value

The present outcomes are enriched to give valuable information for the research scientists in the field of biomedical engineering and other engineering fields. Also, the proposed outcomes are hopefully beneficial for the experimental investigation of the electroosmotic forces on flows with non-Newtonian models and containing a gyrotactic microorganism.

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International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Elizabeth Tompkins

Though the coexistence of nonviolent and violent groups within a single movement is a common phenomenon in maximalist campaigns (e.g., regime change, anti-occupation), the…

Abstract

Though the coexistence of nonviolent and violent groups within a single movement is a common phenomenon in maximalist campaigns (e.g., regime change, anti-occupation), the effects of this coexistence remain understudied. Focusing on primarily nonviolent movements with a simultaneous “radical flank” pursuing the same goals, this study builds on previous, inconclusive literature which narrowly accounts for limited and often case-specific radical flank effects. After conducting a series of large-N regression analyses using a subset of the NAVCO 2.0 dataset, this study finds that the presence of a radical flank (1) increases both the likelihood and degree of repression by the state and (2) is most significantly linked with decreased mobilization post-repression – yet, (3) is not necessarily detrimental to overall campaign progress.

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Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-359-4

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2016

Jennifer L. Nelson and Amanda E. Lewis

In this paper we build upon previous research that examines how workers in devalued occupations transform structural conditions that threaten their dignity into resources…

Abstract

In this paper we build upon previous research that examines how workers in devalued occupations transform structural conditions that threaten their dignity into resources with which to protect themselves. Through in-depth interviews and fieldwork with early childhood educators (ECE), we examine the work experiences of teachers in four distinct work contexts: daycare centers and within elementary schools, each in either the public or private sector. We find that these different school organizational contexts shape what kinds of identity challenges early childhood teachers experience. Different organizational contexts not only subject teachers to different threats to their work-related identity but also have different potential identity resources embedded within them that teachers can use on their own behalf. Thus, while all the early childhood educators in our sample struggle with being employed within a devalued occupation, the identity strategies they have developed to protect their self-worth vary across employment contexts. We show that the strategies these interactive service workers use to solve identity-related problems of dignity at work involve the creative conversion of constraints they face at work into resources that help them achieve valued work identities.

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Research in the Sociology of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-405-1

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Paul E. Levy, Steven T. Tseng, Christopher C. Rosen and Sarah B. Lueke

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed…

Abstract

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed. In this chapter, we review criticisms of traditional PM practices that have been mentioned by journalists and practitioners and we consider the solutions that they have presented for addressing these concerns. We then consider these problems and solutions within the context of extant scholarly research and identify (a) what organizations should do going forward to improve PM practices (i.e., focus on feedback processes, ensure accountability throughout the PM system, and align the PM system with organizational strategy) and (b) what scholars should focus research attention on (i.e., technology, strategic alignment, and peer-to-peer accountability) in order to reduce the science-practice gap in this domain.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Stéphane Clivaz

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the commonality between the Theory of Didactical Situations (TDS) and lesson study to propose a model of lesson study using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the commonality between the Theory of Didactical Situations (TDS) and lesson study to propose a model of lesson study using both the predominant graphical representation of lesson study by Lewis and the model of the didactical situation at the heart of TDS by Brousseau.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting by describing and adapting the predominant graphical representation of lesson study by Lewis and the model of the didactical situation at the heart of TDS by Brousseau, the paper integrates the two representations to highlight the commonalities between the students’ learning situation and the teachers’. Based on this integrated graphical representation, the key phases of lesson study are then conceptualised by the mean of the dialectic between didactical and adidactical situation.

Findings

The reflection about the use of the TDS graphical representation embedded in the lesson study diagram helps the reflection on the use of TDS itself to analyse lesson study. This theoretical analysis describes the process of teacher learning in lesson study and the link between their learning and the student’s. It also shows that lesson study is a good candidate for the fundamental situation of the knowledge for teaching.

Originality/value

The graphical conceptualisation of lesson study as a learning situation for teachers offers new insight about how teachers learn in lesson study.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1963

AS J. L. Hobbs shows so clearly in his recent book, the interest in local history is growing enormously at present. The universities, training colleges and schools, as…

Abstract

AS J. L. Hobbs shows so clearly in his recent book, the interest in local history is growing enormously at present. The universities, training colleges and schools, as well as the institutions of further education, are all making more use of local studies—geographical, economic, social and historical—in their regular courses, in their advanced work, and in their publications.

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New Library World, vol. 64 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1930

WE write on the eve of an Annual Meeting of the Library Association. We expect many interesting things from it, for although it is not the first meeting under the new…

Abstract

WE write on the eve of an Annual Meeting of the Library Association. We expect many interesting things from it, for although it is not the first meeting under the new constitution, it is the first in which all the sections will be actively engaged. From a membership of eight hundred in 1927 we are, in 1930, within measurable distance of a membership of three thousand; and, although we have not reached that figure by a few hundreds—and those few will be the most difficult to obtain quickly—this is a really memorable achievement. There are certain necessary results of the Association's expansion. In the former days it was possible for every member, if he desired, to attend all the meetings; today parallel meetings are necessary in order to represent all interests, and members must make a selection amongst the good things offered. Large meetings are not entirely desirable; discussion of any effective sort is impossible in them; and the speakers are usually those who always speak, and who possess more nerve than the rest of us. This does not mean that they are not worth a hearing. Nevertheless, seeing that at least 1,000 will be at Cambridge, small sectional meetings in which no one who has anything to say need be afraid of saying it, are an ideal to which we are forced by the growth of our numbers.

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New Library World, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2017

P. Lynn Kennedy, Karen E. Lewis and Andrew Schmitz

While genetically modified (GM) crops have provided tremendous agricultural productivity gains, many consumers oppose GM products and maintain they are unsafe. We use the…

Abstract

While genetically modified (GM) crops have provided tremendous agricultural productivity gains, many consumers oppose GM products and maintain they are unsafe. We use the case of GM sugar beets and their adoption by the US producers to examine the implications of GM technology on food security. A partial equilibrium framework is used to examine the implications of GM technology on food security. This analysis provides a unique opportunity to examine the impact of GM adoption in one product (sugar beets) relative to non-GM adoption in a substitute product (sugarcane). This analysis examines the potential gains to food security through the adoption of biotechnology versus consumer fear of GM technology. Research and development (R&D) has potential implications not only through its impact on supply, but also on demand as well. This study shows that demand impacts can negate the supply-induced food security gains of R&D. Regulations such as mandatory labeling requirements can impact this outcome.

Details

World Agricultural Resources and Food Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-515-3

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