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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Mubina Asaria

Greenford High School has been successful in their bid to John Lyon's Charity for their “E-safety for high schools” project to safeguard and educate young people from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Greenford High School has been successful in their bid to John Lyon's Charity for their “E-safety for high schools” project to safeguard and educate young people from the increasing risks emanating from new technologies and the internet. The paper aimed at addressing the significant gap in e-safety provision across schools, the project will enable this school in West London to share and replicate their innovative model of good practice – recently commended by the Ealing Health Improvement Team – with three high schools as part of a three-year training and development programme.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims to provide some background to the project and outline its unique holistic and multifaceted approach to managing e-safety and cyberbullying, within the context of a broader social, behavioural and educational model rather than the narrowly defined ICT context within which it is traditionally perceived.

Findings

E-safety is a whole school issue and can only be effectively addressed through collective critical thinking and a social, cultural and educational approach.

Originality/value

This e-safety project is unique in promoting the opportunities afforded by technology through harnessing the positive role of the bystander and addressing e-safety through a broader, social model and multifaceted approach.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Fenio Annansingh and Thomas Veli

This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their knowledge and experience with electronic safety (e-safety) measures. It also considered parents’, teachers’ and other stakeholders’ perception of internet risks, e-safety procedures and children’s practices while online.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a mixed method approach which involved the use of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results were presented and analysed using descriptive statistics, while the interviews utilised coding and data structuring.

Findings

This research highlighted that e-safety policies and procedures have not kept up to date with technological advances. Children were also developing an online presence, and because it was considered normative behaviour, they were not always cautious. Consequently, society was reactive when dealing with the internet risk issues. Hence, more resources were needed to educate parents and children on safe practices on the internet.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and further research should be conducted for broader generalisations.

Practical implications

The paper makes a number of practical recommendations for education providers and parents to raise awareness of internet risks and e-safety initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper further extends the body of theory on e-safety and provides new insights into the risks exposure of children on the internet. It also highlights the limitations of e-safety initiatives.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Andy Phippen and Simon Ashby

This research explores the implications for risk management of “People Risk.” In particular how online digital behaviors, particularly from young people entering the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the implications for risk management of “People Risk.” In particular how online digital behaviors, particularly from young people entering the workplace for the first time, might impact on the work setting and how risk management might mitigate impact on the employee and organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used to consider these implications and draws from a number of data sources in the United Kingdom including a database of self-review data around online safety policy and practice from over 2000 schools, a survey of over 1000 14–16 year olds and their attitudes toward sexting, and a survey of over 500 undergraduate students. In addition the work considers existing risk management approaches and the models therein and how they might be applied to people risk.

Findings

The dataset analyzed in this exploration show an education system in the United Kingdom that is not adequately preparing young people with an awareness of the implications of digital behavior in their lives and the survey data shows distorted social norms that might have serious consequences in the workplace.

Practical implications

This research should raise concerns for managers in the workplace who need to be aware of the changes in “normal” behavior and how these potentially harmful practices may be mitigated in the workplace.

Originality/value

The research provides a strong evidence base for a change in “acceptable” social behavior by children and young people alongside an education system not promoting effective awareness. These two datasets combined highlight potential new risks to the workplace.

Details

Social Media in Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-898-3

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Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2011

John Woollard

This chapter reports on the innovative and developing use of a virtual world environment to support the training and professional development of pre-service teachers of…

Abstract

This chapter reports on the innovative and developing use of a virtual world environment to support the training and professional development of pre-service teachers of information and communications technology (ICT), information technology (IT) and computing. The findings show that the online experience promotes confidence and competence in virtual world activity. It also stimulates thinking about the potential of alternative methods for teaching and learning in schools. The case study participants were 16 trainee teachers aged between 21 and 55 years old, with varying backgrounds including those with careers in the computing industry, those straight from university and those having spent considerable time in schools as unqualified teachers. In Second Life they experienced a number of environments and discussed the potential of virtual worlds. The tutors believe that Second Life can offer a valuable environment to promote engagement by pre-service teachers in innovative and imaginative methods of teaching and for them to better understand the affordances of virtual worlds.

Details

Transforming Virtual World Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-053-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2019

Monica T. Whitty

This paper aims to examine predictors (personality, belief systems, expertise and response time) of detecting online romance scams.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine predictors (personality, belief systems, expertise and response time) of detecting online romance scams.

Design/methodology/approach

The online study asked 261 participants to rate whether a profile was a scam or a genuine profile. Participants were also asked to complete a personality inventory, belief scales and demographic, descriptive questions. The online study was also designed to measure response time.

Findings

It was found that those who scored low in romantic beliefs, high in impulsivity, high in consideration of future consequences, had previously spotted a romance scam and took longer response times were more likely to accurately distinguish scams from genuine profiles. Notably, the research also found that it was difficult to detect scams. The research also found that it was important to adapt Whitty’s (2013) “Scammers Persuasive Techniques Model” to include a stage named: “human detection of scam versus genuine profiles”.

Originality/value

This is the first study, to the author’s knowledge, that examines predictors of human accuracy in detecting romance scams. Dating sites and government e-safety sites might draw upon these findings to help improve human detection and protect users from this financial and psychologically harmful cyberscam.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Jeff Gavin and Adrian J. Scott

Revenge pornography is a growing risk among adolescents and young adults. Often stemming from sexting, some victims of revenge pornography report experiencing victim-blame…

Abstract

Purpose

Revenge pornography is a growing risk among adolescents and young adults. Often stemming from sexting, some victims of revenge pornography report experiencing victim-blame similar to that accompanying the reporting of rape. The purpose of this paper is to explore the assumptions that underlie attributions of victim-blame, with a focus on perpetrator and victim responsibility, as well as gendered assumptions surrounding sexting.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 222 UK university students (111 male, 111 females) read one of two versions of a hypothetical revenge pornography scenario, one involving a male victim of a female perpetrator, the other a female victim of a male perpetrator. They then responded to an open-ended question regarding responsibility.

Findings

Qualitative content analysis of these responses identified three inter-related themes: the victim’s behaviour, mitigating victim responsibility and minimising the behaviour.

Social implications

The majority of participants in this study attributed at least some responsibility to the victims of revenge pornography depicted in the scenarios. Sex of the victim played a less important role than assumptions around sexting.

Originality/value

The study suggests that victim-blame is linked to the consent implied by sharing intimate images with a partner, but is also mitigated by the normative nature of this relationship practice. There was some evidence that the experience of male victims of revenge pornography is trivialised. These findings have implications for e-safety and victim support.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1963

A.A. Lombard and A.J. Heyworth

THE Society of Automotive Engineers' paper, upon which this article is based, followed very closely along the lines of an article entitled ‘Composite Power Plant System…

Abstract

THE Society of Automotive Engineers' paper, upon which this article is based, followed very closely along the lines of an article entitled ‘Composite Power Plant System for V/S.T.O.L. Aircraft’ published in the December, 1962, issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING [see Ref. (4)]—although the latter paper concentrated upon a description of the RB. 162 and the use of lightweight lift engines for a V/S.T.O.L. low‐level strike fighter. The S.A.E. paper has therefore been slightly condensed here, to avoid unnecessary duplication and a number of illustrations have been omitted. Throughout this paper there are references to the advantages of a multi‐engined aircraft for the V/S.T.O.L. fighter application in preference to the single‐engined type. These passages must be read in the light of the recent statement to the effect that Rolls‐Royce have submitted to the Ministry of Aviation design proposals for a version of the Hawker PA 154 V.T.O.L. aircraft powered by two lift/thrust engines based upon the Spey by‐pass engine. These two lift (thrust engines would replace the single Bristol Siddeley BS.100 vectored thrust engine which is believed to have a thrust (with plenum chamber burning) of about 30,000 lb. Apart from the more obvious advantage of having two engines, i.e. safety, and the ability of the aircraft to complete the mission as a conventional aircraft if one engine fails, there is also the additional and attractive proposition that the Rolls‐Royce Spey engine is already in quantity production for a number of civil and military aircraft and could presumably be readily adapted to a lift/thrust configuration with front nozzle incorporating plenum chamber burning and rear nozzle. Finally, the reader is recommended to study in full the articles referred to in Refs. (2), (3), (4) and (5), in addition to this paper, since these provide a comprehensive survey of the jet lift field and in particular the application of jet lift to V/S.T.O.L. fighters. The six references listed on this page did not, of course, form part of the original S.A.E. paper—Editor.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Chandrakantan Subramaniam, Faridahwati Mohd. Shamsudin, Md. Lazim Mohd Zin, Subramaniam Sri Ramalu and Zuraida Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of safety participation as a mediator in the relationship between the six facets of safety management practices (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of safety participation as a mediator in the relationship between the six facets of safety management practices (i.e. management commitment, safety training, worker’s involvement, safety communication and feedback, safety rules and procedures, and safety promotion policies) and safety compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 74 employees of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the northern region of Peninsular Malaysia was carried out. Self-reported measures were used to obtain data on workplace safety dimensions and safety behavior. The partial least square structural model analysis was used to ascertain the proposed relationships.

Findings

The present study found that only three dimensions of safety management practices (management commitment, safety training, and safety rules and procedures) were significantly related to safety compliance. Of these, safety participation mediated the link between management commitment and safety training and safety compliance.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size may limit the generalizability of the findings. Second, the correlational nature of the study did not permit causation to be implied. However, despite these limitations, while safety performance can be theorized to trigger the establishment of safety management practices, such theoretical perspective tends to connote reactivity rather than proactivity of the decision-making process.

Practical implications

The study highlights the role of the voluntary behavior of employees in promoting a safe work environment. Business owners are recommended to provide safety training in which the employees are stressed on their crucial role in safety and use this knowledge to educate and convince their co-workers to work safely.

Originality/value

Literature indicates the lack of studies on safety research in SMEs. Furthermore, such studies are justified because SMEs are likely to have more risks of occupational accidents and injuries. More importantly, this research highlights the importance of the voluntary behaviors of employees (i.e. safety participation) in promoting a safe work environment. As SMEs tend to have limited resources to implement a comprehensive OSH management system, using the employees as the safety agents at work can be an effective way toward accomplishing safety performance.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Irina Farquhar and Alan Sorkin

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized…

Abstract

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized innovative information technology open architecture design and integrating Radio Frequency Identification Device data technologies and real-time optimization and control mechanisms as the critical technology components of the solution. The innovative information technology, which pursues the focused logistics, will be deployed in 36 months at the estimated cost of $568 million in constant dollars. We estimate that the Systems, Applications, Products (SAP)-based enterprise integration solution that the Army currently pursues will cost another $1.5 billion through the year 2014; however, it is unlikely to deliver the intended technical capabilities.

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

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