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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Liangchao Xue, Christopher J. Parker and Cathy Hart

High-street fashion retail faces an uncertain future because of fluctuating consumer shopping habits. To revive fashion retailers, adopting disruptive technologies such as…

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1495

Abstract

Purpose

High-street fashion retail faces an uncertain future because of fluctuating consumer shopping habits. To revive fashion retailers, adopting disruptive technologies such as virtual reality (VR) becomes important to offer highly valued consumer experiences. Yet v-commerce designers still lack sufficient guidance to create effective retail environments. This paper establishes the v-commerce experience that targets fashion consumers’ desire and presents 13 specific design guidelines.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 22 participants, 20 consumers and two VR developers were interviewed regarding attitudes towards VR, motivation to shop through v-commerce and the moderating variables that influence virtual environment perceptions.

Findings

Consumers expect a vivid shopping environment with authentic product features instead of the more common simulated environment. Hedonically motivated consumers are more open to v-commerce than utilitarian consumers and consumers aged 18–34 years regard interactivity, personalisation and social networking as critical to offer a cost-efficient shopping experience.

Research limitations/implications

This paper explored the ways v-commerce delivers creative experiences to facilitate consumer purchase behaviour, contributing to the high street's regeneration. Yet consumers have too high expectations of lifelike interaction in v-commerce, which is beyond contemporary VR's capabilities. Future research should focus on developing authenticity of v-commerce environments, i.e. vivid interaction with product and people.

Originality/value

This paper establishes the fundamental design rules for v-commerce platforms, enabling designers to create effective retail environments, sympathetic to the consumer's cognitive desires.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Thomas Chesney, Swee-Hoon Chuah, Angela R. Dobele and Robert Hoffmann

The potential for e-commerce is limited by a trust deficit when traders do not interact in a physical, bricks-and-mortar context. The theory of information richness posits…

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1779

Abstract

Purpose

The potential for e-commerce is limited by a trust deficit when traders do not interact in a physical, bricks-and-mortar context. The theory of information richness posits that equivocal interactions, such as ones requiring trust, can be facilitated through communication media that transmit multiple cues interactively. This study aims to examine the potential of information-rich virtual worlds to reduce this trust deficit compared with more traditional Web-based e-tailing environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Rather than focusing on stated intentions, the authors adopt an experimental approach to measure behaviour. Participants receive performance-related financial incentives to perform trust games in different information-rich treatments that represent three retail environments: a physical environment representing bricks-and-mortar trade, an electronic environment representing Web-based online retailing and a virtual environment representing virtual world retail.

Findings

The authors find that the two dimensions of trust significantly differ between the treatments. In particular, as hypothesised, both trustingness and trustworthiness are higher in the virtual than in the electronic environment. However, contrary to the hypotheses, physical trade is not associated with greater trust than virtual trade.

Research limitations/implications

The authors extend previous research by demonstrating how the information richness of the virtual world interface can promote e-commerce by deepening trust between trading partners. This research also complements existing work that approaches product and service interfaces through the lens of servicescapes.

Practical implications

The findings also contribute towards the development of services marketing practice and the design of e-commerce environments.

Originality/value

Much of the work in this space considers purchase intentions and attitudes around trust, whereas this study looks at actual trust behaviour in the virtual space.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Michael D. Clemes, Christopher Gan and Dongmei Zhang

There is intense competition and increasing globalisation in financial markets. Bank management must develop customer‐oriented strategies in order to compete successfully…

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7887

Abstract

Purpose

There is intense competition and increasing globalisation in financial markets. Bank management must develop customer‐oriented strategies in order to compete successfully in the competitive retail banking environment. The longer a bank can retain a customer, the greater revenue and cost savings from that customer. China's accession to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) has resulted in the liberalisation and deregulation of China's financial services market. Chinese customers now have greater choices between domestic and foreign banks. This study aims to identify and analyse the factors that influence bank customers' switching behaviour in the Chinese retail banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this analysis was obtained using a convenience sample of 421 bank customers in Jiaozuo City, Henan Province, China. The decision to switch banks is hypothesised to be a function of price, reputation, service quality, effective advertising competition, involuntary switching, distance, switching costs, distance, and demographic characteristics. Factor analysis and logistic regression are used to analyse the data and identify and rank the factors that impact on the bank switching behaviour of customers.

Findings

The research findings reveal that price, reputation, service quality, effective advertising, involuntary switching, distance, and switching costs impact on customers' bank switching behaviour. The findings also reveal that the young and high‐income groups are more likely to switch banks.

Practical implications

The results of this research allow service marketers and practitioners to develop and implement service marketing strategies to decrease customer defection rates, and in turn, increase bank profits. Furthermore, this research provides useful information for future researchers investigating customer switching behaviour in the retail banking industry.

Originality/value

This paper provides an empirical analysis of Chinese bank switching behaviour and provides a framework for future studies on the behaviour of bank customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

George K. Chacko

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade…

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2453

Abstract

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange for Auto Parts procurement by GM, Ford, Daimler‐Chrysler and Renault‐Nissan. Provides many case studies with regards to the adoption of technology and describes seven chief technology officer characteristics. Discusses common errors when companies invest in technology and considers the probabilities of success. Provides 175 questions and answers to reinforce the concepts introduced. States that this substantial journal is aimed primarily at the present and potential chief technology officer to assist their survival and success in national and international markets.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Juanjuan Wu, Bo Ra Joo, Ahmad Saquib Sina, Sanga Song and Claire Haesung Whang

The authors conducted an action research study with the aim of understanding current commercial offerings in modular designs in virtual environments and to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors conducted an action research study with the aim of understanding current commercial offerings in modular designs in virtual environments and to explore modularity development based on consumer input for the purpose of personalizing three-dimensional (3D) virtual fashion stores.

Design/methodology/approach

Through five phases of diagnosing, action planning, action taking, evaluating and specifying learning, the authors attempted to diagnose the current commercial offerings of modular designs in virtual spaces and to identify the right type and the number of modules and modular options for personalizing 3D virtual stores based on consumers' actual designs and focus group input. The authors then further conceptualized modules to serve as an example for developing modularity in 3D virtual reality (VR) stores.

Findings

In the diagnosing phase, the authors investigated the modularity structure of cocreating a retail store in two popular virtual worlds: Second Life and The Sims 4. In the evaluation phase, the authors identified modules and modular options for personalizing 3D virtual stores based on a content analysis of consumers' post-design focus group discussions. In the last phase (specifying learning), the authors conceptualized a total of nine modules and 38 modular options for personalizing 3D virtual stores, including style, price point, product category, color, presence of avatar, virtual product try-on, music, product recommendation and product customization.

Originality/value

The significance of this study lies in the pioneering methodological work of identifying, creating and visualizing 3D VR modular store options based on consumer input and in improving the authors’ understanding of current commercial offerings. This study also enriches design theories on cocreation systems. The authors’ suggested modules for personalizing 3D virtual stores could inspire future evidence-based designs to be readily used by VR retailers as well extend the application of mass customization theory from the realm of product development to retail environments.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Ioannis Krasonikolakis and Nancy Pouloudi

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to provide an overview of related studies and to highlight research gaps and questions that need to be addressed. Research conducted…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to provide an overview of related studies and to highlight research gaps and questions that need to be addressed. Research conducted in three-dimensional (3D) online environments constitutes a different research context, not least because it involves the recruitment of avatars in the research process. Researchers need to appreciate better the ethical concerns that arise in this novel, fast-evolving context and how these concern different stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs an interdisciplinary desk-research approach. It critically reviews related literature, highlights the involved stakeholders, discusses ethical issues from a marketing research perspective and concludes with a discussion of related studies and research gaps, providing direct future research avenues.

Findings

The characteristics of the 3D online environments and the behaviour and experiences of their users set the boundaries and guide the way regarding the ethical research in this context.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not present primary empirical results, instead it reviews and critiques related literature in 3D online environments and sets the agenda for future research.

Practical implications

The paper provides ethical guidelines and identifies blurred areas in conducting or participating in research in 3D online environments.

Originality/value

Based on earlier studies and examples of ethical concerns when studying 3D online environments, this paper emphasises the parameters that should be taken into consideration in current and future research studies.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Alison Felstead

This paper is based on a survey of the literature on integrated library management systems published between 1999 and 2003, with a bias towards the academic market in the…

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2998

Abstract

This paper is based on a survey of the literature on integrated library management systems published between 1999 and 2003, with a bias towards the academic market in the UK and North America. It describes how new functionality within ILMSs and products complementary to these integrated systems are being offered by software vendors, causing libraries to replace legacy systems with next generation systems and spend more money on add‐on products. Recent trends in integrated library management systems are noted and predictions for their future identified in the literature, are described. Open source software is highlighted as being likely to have a growing impact on the ILMS of the future, after an initial resistance to this from vendors. The paper concludes that the growth of Web services may enable a new approach to the procurement of library management systems.

Details

Program, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Yacan Wang, Jason Anderson, Seong-Jong Joo and Joseph R. Huscroft

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the repurchase intention of a customer and his/her perception of various aspects of an e-tailer’s…

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1749

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the repurchase intention of a customer and his/her perception of various aspects of an e-tailer’s product return process, such as leniency, fairness and quality of the return process.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focuses on these aspects through the expectation disconfirmation theoretical lens, looking at the relationship between expectations shaped by the product return policy and the repurchase intention. This research collects data using a survey approach and analyzes it using structural equation modeling.

Findings

It was found that perceived return policy leniency, perceived fairness of the return experience and perceived quality of the return experience are important and supporting factors that influence a customer’s intention to be a return customer to e-tailers. Perceived leniency was found to not only be the most influential factor for return purchase intention but it also significantly impacted the perceived fairness and the quality of the return process. As a result, perceived leniency of the return policy had a “halo” effect on the other factors.

Practical implications

This suggests that the majority of an e-tailer’s effort should be expended determining a return policy and experience that is widely perceived as lenient as this will overall improve customer perception of the return process and increase repurchase intention.

Originality/value

This research extends research on lenient policy within the growing e-tailer sector by examining the return experience of the customer and subsequent repurchase intention based on multiple factors.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Marcin Lipowski and Ilona Bondos

The purpose of this paper is to identify the differences in the perceived media richness of three marketing channels by different consumer generations as well as to…

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1578

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the differences in the perceived media richness of three marketing channels by different consumer generations as well as to indicate the importance of the perceived media richness of each of channel for the intention of online use at pre-purchase stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a sample of 1,103 consumers in Poland, which research sample included three generations: Baby Boomers, X generation and Y generation. Computer-assisted personal interview method was used with a standardised questionnaire; the research sample was determined using a quota-random method, with the quotas referring to age and gender and the nature of the place of residence (provincial town, town/city other than a provincial one, or a village) – the structure of the sample was maintained at the regional level.

Findings

Analysed channels (online, offline, phone) have different perceived media richness. Consumers from different generations can perceive media richness of the same marketing channels in various ways. Perceived media richness of the analysed marketing channels has an impact on the intention to use the channel online.

Research limitations/implications

First, the fact of blurring differences between consumers generation, particularly X and Y generation. As well the fact that each generation has identified an internal diversity. Second limitation refers to the type of marketing channels included in research. Finally, limitation also applies to spatial extent of the study. The above limitations can also be some directions of future research – taking into account some other marketing channels and verifying the conclusions on other consumer groups.

Practical implications

General recommendation refers to the need for treating customers in each marketing channel in the same way – immediate response is one of the aspects of this recommended unified customer service in multichannel environment. Online channel communications with customers should be supported by giving consumers more personalised communication via phone, chat and social media. For older consumers, it is recommended to gradually redirect them to an online channel. Information search is a good start for online customer journey, because this channel at the pre-purchase stage is the most useful and least risky for the consumer unfamiliar with online environment.

Social implications

Better understanding of the needs of different customers generations and their perception of different marketing channel at the pre-purchase stage.

Originality/value

Identification of intergenerational differences in the perception of media richness of online, phone and offline channels.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Sanjit Kumar Roy, Vaibhav Shekhar, Ali Quazi and Mohammed Quaddus

The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of service convenience in the relationship between organizational characteristics (such as brand equity, store…

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1145

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of service convenience in the relationship between organizational characteristics (such as brand equity, store ambiance, store layout, customer information and employee responsiveness) on customer engagement behaviors (CEBs), including service improvement, customer cooperation, positive word-of-mouth and customer helping customers. It examines two research models, with service convenience as a separate antecedent of CEBs (model A) and as a mediating variable between organizational characteristics and CEBs (model B).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a positivist paradigm, data were collected from 384 respondents representing the existing customers of grocery retailers based in India via a survey instrument. Data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) path modeling.

Findings

Results demonstrate service convenience as a motivational driver of CEBs. Results also show that the organizational characteristics significantly influence service convenience which in turn impacts CEBs.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for store managers in effective management of customers' time and effort in terms of saving customers' time and effort as well as motivating customers to elicit their engagement behaviors.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in identifying the impact of organizational characteristics in helping customers to save time and effort in their shopping activities and thereby elicit various types of CEBs. The paper also adds to knowledge by examining the role of service convenience in the nexus between organizational characteristics and CEB types.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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