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Case study
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Chen Cheng, Nicola Persico and Nicola Scocchi

You are the CEO of an e-cigarette company that has just been acquired by a major tobacco company. Your company operates in the European market. The July 2013 draft of the…

Abstract

You are the CEO of an e-cigarette company that has just been acquired by a major tobacco company. Your company operates in the European market. The July 2013 draft of the EU Tobacco Products Directive (TPD) recently has been crafted by the European Commission, but it has not yet been examined by the EU Parliament and its Council. The draft proposes that all e-cigarette products be classified as medical devices, regardless of nicotine content. This is the strictest available mode of regulation. If the directive goes into effect as written, e-cigarettes would have to undergo costly and lengthy clinical trials to receive approval and face much stricter marketability restrictions.

The case details the state of the e-cigarette industry in 2013, including consumer data, distribution, competition from similar products, and public health concerns. Students will analyze the current regulatory environment, determine what outcome would be most favorable to the e-cigarette industry, and identify the ways to achieve that goal.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Neil L. Wilcox and Patricia I. Kovacevic

This article aims to provide an informed overview of the current policy and upcoming e‐cigarette legislation, and their impact on the potential for harm reduction in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide an informed overview of the current policy and upcoming e‐cigarette legislation, and their impact on the potential for harm reduction in the tobacco products arena in the USA. The article argues in favor of reasonable regulatory options supportive of harm reduction, and which take into consideration the realities of the emerging US e‐cigarette market.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider the recent refocus on harm reduction potential in the e‐cigarettes, which are growing in popularity but will be soon subject to potentially very restrictive regulation. This article provides an overview of selected, relevant provisions of the US tobacco product regulatory framework as it may soon apply to e‐cigarettes, not only for the benefit of the tobacco harm reduction debate, but also to global stakeholders, as well.

Findings

FDA needs strong leadership to avoid current political pressures to label all tobacco products as equally dangerous, vilify nicotine and deny a reasonable approach to harm reduction that promotes the benefits of reduced risk as a legitimate approach to better health. Admittedly, more research is needed before a final assessment can be made on the population‐level health benefits of e‐cigarettes.

Originality/value

This article provides an informed view of US e‐cigarette industry regulatory challenges by two industry regulatory experts, and an overview of possible e‐cigarette regulatory outcomes in the USA, in light of the US Food and Drug Administration announcement that such regulation is to be expected shortly.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Gerry V. Stimson

The purpose of this paper is to compare the response to HIV/AIDS and drug use (drugs harm reduction) with tobacco harm reduction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the response to HIV/AIDS and drug use (drugs harm reduction) with tobacco harm reduction.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of historical and contemporary sources, combined with personal knowledge of key stakeholders in the history and development of both fields.

Findings

Both drugs harm reduction and tobacco harm reduction share a similar objective – to reduce health risks for people who are unwilling or unable to stop using their drug of choice. Both also share a broader public health aim of helping people to make healthier decisions. Drugs harm reduction – as a response to HIV/AIDS – included the adoption of a wide range of radical harm reduction interventions and was a public health success. It became an established part of the professional Public Health agenda. In contrast the Public Health response to e-cigarettes and tobacco harm reduction has ranged from the negative to the cautious. A recent Public Health England report is exceptional for its endorsement of e-cigarettes.

Originality/value

Highlights contradictions in Public Health responses to drugs and tobacco; and that public health interventions can be implemented without and despite the contribution of professional Public Health.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Renée O'Leary and Riccardo Polosa

This paper aims to overview the need for tobacco harm reduction, the consumer products that facilitate tobacco harm reduction and the barriers to its implementation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to overview the need for tobacco harm reduction, the consumer products that facilitate tobacco harm reduction and the barriers to its implementation. The worldwide endemic of tobacco smoking results in the death of over seven million smokers a year. Cigarette quit rates are very low, from 3%–12%, and relapse rates are high, from 75%–80% in the first six months and 30%–40% even after one year of abstinence. In addition, some smokers do not desire to quit. Cigarette substitution in tobacco harm reduction is one strategy that may reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality.

Design/methodology/approach

This review examines the displacement of smoking through substitution of non-combustible low-risk products such as snus, heated tobacco products and e-cigarettes.

Findings

Toxicological testing, population studies, clinical trials and randomized controlled trials demonstrate the potential reductions in exposures for smokers. Many barriers impede the implementation of product substitution in tobacco harm reduction. These products have been subjected to regulatory bans and heavy taxation and are rejected by smokers and society based on misperceptions about nicotine, sensational media headlines and unsubstantiated fears of youth addiction. These barriers will need to be addressed if tobacco harm reduction is to make the maximum impact on the tobacco endemic.

Originality/value

This review provides the rationale for tobacco harm reduction, evaluates the current products available and identifies the barriers to implementation.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Christopher Snowdon

The paper aims to describe the public health potential and legal status of electronic cigarettes (e‐cigarettes) and Swedish snus. The author evaluates claims made for and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the public health potential and legal status of electronic cigarettes (e‐cigarettes) and Swedish snus. The author evaluates claims made for and against tobacco harm reduction.

Design/methodology/approach

The author presents the scientific evidence for tobacco harm reduction and evaluates competing claims.

Findings

The legal status of cigarettes, e‐cigarettes and snus in many jurisdictions is not commensurate with their respective risk profiles. The prohibition of the least hazardous forms of nicotine delivery is not based on any coherent regulatory pyramid and can only be explained by the hostility of some anti‐smoking campaigners towards tobacco harm reduction.

Originality/value

The paper uses the most recent data available at the time of publication in its analysis of a rapidly growing market and a volatile regulatory environment.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

William D. Diamond

This paper aims to examine preferences for different smoking cessation tools, investigates smokers’ perceptions of these tools by examining their brand personalities and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine preferences for different smoking cessation tools, investigates smokers’ perceptions of these tools by examining their brand personalities and determines whether these perceptions predict intentions to use particular cessation tools.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys of smokers evaluated cessation tools from electronic cigarettes to hypnosis.

Findings

Smokers showed a strong preference for electronic cigarettes over other cessation tools. Different aspects of brand personality predicted intention to use different cessation tools.

Research limitations/implications

The research used online surveys rather than real purchasing behavior. The results indicate that advertisements emphasizing the personality attributes of different cessation tools could be effective in encouraging the use of appropriate cessation tools.

Social implications

If research validates e-cigarettes as a valuable cigarette smoking cessation tool, then public service advertisements encouraging their use should emphasize their sincerity and excitement. If e-cigarettes have a net negative effect on public health, public service advertising should stress that the marketing of e-cigarettes is not sincere.

Originality/value

This research extends the idea of brand personality, showing how it can encourage behavior that promotes public health goals.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 May 2019

McConnell explained that his move is to crack down on middle and high school students increasingly using “tobacco products” and becoming “hooked”. This comes as a federal…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB244021

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Surapong Chudech and Piyapong Janmaimool

This study aims to investigate university students' knowledge about and attitudes toward e-cigarette (EC) use. It will also examine whether students' EC use is associated…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate university students' knowledge about and attitudes toward e-cigarette (EC) use. It will also examine whether students' EC use is associated with knowledge about and attitudes toward EC use. The study also aims to analyze the determinants of students' use of ECs. The effects of gender, smoking behavior and friends' and family members' smoking behaviors on students' use of ECs were analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Completed questionnaire surveys were received from 1,362 students at King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi in Bangkok City, Thailand, in November and December 2019. Chi-square tests and an independent samples t-test were conducted to determine whether students' knowledge about ECs and attitudes toward EC use influenced their use of ECs. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant factors affecting students' use of ECs.

Findings

The results revealed that students' EC use was associated with knowledge about ECs: Students with less knowledge about the harmful effects of ECs were more likely to use them. In addition, students who were EC users had more positive attitudes toward EC use than those who were not EC users. The results also revealed that male students, students who had also smoked tobacco cigarettes and students with friends who smoked tobacco cigarettes were more likely to use ECs. These results could suggest strategies to reduce the use of ECs among university students.

Originality/value

This study provides deep understanding about university students' knowledge about and attitudes toward EC use and their participation in EC use. The result clearly shows university students who are participating in EC use still have less knowledge about EC, thus, they have positive attitudes toward ECs. Gaining social acceptance from friends who use EC also influences students' decision to use EC. Therefore, EC use among students could significantly increase overall EC use.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Pekka Hakkarainen

The purpose of this paper is to study vaporizers – especially the vape pen – as a new technology in cannabis use. Until now, almost all information on the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study vaporizers – especially the vape pen – as a new technology in cannabis use. Until now, almost all information on the use of vaporizers or e-cigarettes for cannabis consumption has come from the internet, the popular press, and accounts by users, but not from the scientific literature. More research is needed.

Design/methodology/approach

Since scientific studies of the phenomenon are virtually non-existent, the author will also base his study on sociological reflections upon internet sites and articles published both in subcultural and mainstream media. The author will document a national estimate of the prevalence of vaping based on a recent population survey in Finland.

Findings

Vaping is an emerging trend in cannabis culture internationally. It has been seen as a healthier route of administration than traditional ways of smoking cannabis. Other images, created especially with the help of advanced high-tech machinery and stylish and fashionable designs for the vape pen, are aiming at being cool and easy to use. In Finland, 6 percent of cannabis users make regular use of a vaporizer, and around a quarter of users use one occasionally. A vape pen or e-cigarette was regularly used by 2.6 percent and occasionally by 9.1 percent of cannabis users.

Originality/value

The trend of increasing vaping and the use of new devices has not been properly recognized among researchers. The paper presents some original results from a national population survey.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Sudhanshu Patwardhan and Jed E. Rose

The purpose of this paper is to review the barriers in the dissemination of effective smoking cessation treatments and services globally. Offering tobacco users help to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the barriers in the dissemination of effective smoking cessation treatments and services globally. Offering tobacco users help to stop using tobacco is a key demand reduction measure outlined under Article 14 of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). Implementing Article 14 can reap great dividends for the billion plus tobacco users around the world and their families, friends and societies.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the status of the global implementation of Article 14 using available literature on smoking cessation products, services and national guidelines. Discussing innovative approaches being currently explored in South Asia that can lead to faster adoption and implementation of Article 14 globally.

Findings

Major gaps remain in cessation products’ availability and resource allocation for cessation services globally. Current licensed products are falling short on delivering and sustaining smoking cessation. Innovation in cessation products and services needs to build on learnings in nicotine pharmacokinetics, behavioural insights from consumer research and tap into 21st century tools such as mobile based apps. National implementation of FCTC’s Article 14 needs to follow guidelines that encourage integration into existing health programmes and health-care practitioners’ (HCPs) upskilling.

Originality/value

Smoking cessation is a desirable health outcome and nicotine replacement products are a means of achieving cessation through tobacco harm reduction. E-cigarettes are sophisticated nicotine replacement products. Innovation is urgently needed to fill the gaps in smoking cessation products and services, and for converting global policy into local practice. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), HCPs’ knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding tobacco use and cessation may hold the key to rapidly scaling up cessation support and delivery to achieve FCTC objectives sooner. Additionally, HCPs can play an important role in offering smoking cessation support in existing national health programmes for TB, cancer screening and maternal and child health. Also, widely prevalent smartphone devices may deliver smoking cessation through telemedicine in LMICs sooner, leapfrogging the hurdles of the existing health-care infrastructure.

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