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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Ti Yu

The purpose of this paper is to find answers to the following questions: How do employers think about e‐portfolios? Do employers really see e‐portfolios as a suitable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find answers to the following questions: How do employers think about e‐portfolios? Do employers really see e‐portfolios as a suitable hiring tool? Which factors in students' e‐portfolios attract potential employers? Can e‐portfolios be successfully used by students in their search for a job?

Design/methodology/approach

A semi‐structured interview survey was used in this study. All ten interviewees were HR managers from ten different companies. They were interviewed face‐to‐face between December 2010 and May 2011. In order to collect a broad range of multiple ideas, the interviewees came from a wide range of industries including tourism, product design, real estate, information and technology, insurance, recruitment service, and others.

Findings

The results of this survey showed that the e‐portfolio is perhaps still in its early stage of development. Nevertheless, the employer interviews indicate a high and consistent level of interest by the employers, indicating a promising future of the e‐portfolio as a job search tool. In addition, employers can use specific information to conduct to pre‐screen candidates. On the other hand, they may include the e‐portfolio as a factor in the final phase of the selection process to obtain a deeper and more complete level of information (e.g. learning reflections) that can clearly demonstrate a job applicant's characteristics and potential for career development.

Originality/value

Faculty members and career service staff in universities and colleges should consider promoting e‐portfolios to employers as a promising tool for selecting their next employee.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Pier Giuseppe Rossi, Patrizia Magnoler and Lorella Giannandrea

An e‐portfolio is a useful tool to increase reflection and awareness in teachers and students. However, benefits of e‐portfolio use are weakened by difficulties due to the…

Abstract

Purpose

An e‐portfolio is a useful tool to increase reflection and awareness in teachers and students. However, benefits of e‐portfolio use are weakened by difficulties due to the lack of motivation, the heavy weight of creation and revision of the e‐portfolios, the rigid tool structure. The paper aims to answer these emerging issues, showing how to cope with the above‐mentioned questions, by proposing a structure for an e‐portfolio able to fulfil the users' needs and to be perceived as an extremely usable and motivating tool.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper three types of e‐portfolios are described. A brief survey of how the students used them with related data is provided. The research is based upon qualitative (students' posts) and quantitative (log tracement) data.

Findings

After five years of experimentation and over 200 e‐portfolios analysed, the paper describes lessons learned and suggests some guidelines that might be useful to plan the introduction and the implementation of an e‐portfolio in post degree courses and for adult and in‐service learning.

Originality/value

In the paper some guidelines for designing formative portfolios are shown. These guidelines might be used to design and build feasible e‐portfolios in different kinds of courses. The new perspective is about the use of formative e‐portfolios in different learning paths. The paper shows how, starting from the same structure, the model is able to fit various needs, proposing technological and pedagogical devices in order to foster reflection and to promote formal and informal recording of learning activities.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gary McKenna, Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of staff and students towards adopting the use of e-portfolios for the purposes of supporting the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of staff and students towards adopting the use of e-portfolios for the purposes of supporting the concept of personal development planning (PDP). The study compares and contrasts the views and opinions of staff and students at one UK Higher Education Institution (HEI) about whether e-portfolios can support PDP.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a case study approach, this study presents empirical data gathered from two surveys involving 460 students and 182 lecturers from one UK HEI, collected from four different campuses across the West of Scotland.

Findings

The results of the surveys showed that the framework the authors used in the research to collect information about students and staffs attitudes was effective and that further research is merited for a more extensive investigation into PDP e-portfolio usage within HEI.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted at only one UK HEI so at this stage of the research, it is difficult to assess how generalisable the findings are.

Practical implications

This study provides useful empirical evidence to educators who may be considering employing e-portfolios within an educational context. For example, the views of students and staff identified in this paper can aid towards informing educators about some of the issues that might impact on using e-portfolios for supporting PDP in higher education.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first work that presents survey data on both students’ and lecturers’ attitudes towards e-portfolio use to support and facilitate PDP.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Darren Cambridge

E‐portfolios, which document and facilitate learning and performance, have recently attracted interest in the USA, UK, and Europe as means to increase employability and…

Abstract

Purpose

E‐portfolios, which document and facilitate learning and performance, have recently attracted interest in the USA, UK, and Europe as means to increase employability and support lifelong learning. This article aims to critically examine these objectives in order to guide the future e‐portfolio practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Social theory, drawing on the work of Foucault, suggests that the discourse of employability and lifelong learning shapes individuals into means to fulfill economic objectives. This theory is applied to show that many e‐portfolio projects participate in this discourse. In the USA, the discourse around integrative learning suggests an alternative.

Findings

Integrative learning has two different styles, which correspond with two different types of self, the network and symphonic. The network self suggests ways for e‐portfolios to promote employability, while representing the symphonic in e‐portfolios creates space for a broader conception of what is important in life that pushes back against an entirely economic conception of citizenship. e‐portfolio projects have made progress cultivating both kinds of selves, and two, the Nedcar project in The Netherlands, and the eFolio Minnesota project in the USA, are examined. These selves need to be woven together, layering the networked and symphonic, to create e‐portfolios that promote employability while asserting the value of their authors as whole human beings. The idea of “good work” developed to describe the professions may serve as a model for this integration.

Originality/value

Much current work developing e‐portfolio software, services, and policies uncritically embraces the problematic conceptions of employability and lifelong learning discussed. The alternative model proposed in the paper can inform future work.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2011

Jin Gon Shon

A portfolio is used to plan, organize and document learning, and it accumulates results of learning. However, there are some problems in managing a portfolio. For example…

Abstract

A portfolio is used to plan, organize and document learning, and it accumulates results of learning. However, there are some problems in managing a portfolio. For example, it is very difficult to keep the portfolio in the original form physically, and it requires a lot of time and effort to keep it updated. These problems can be solved by an electronic portfolio (e-portfolio), a collection of electronic evidence assembled and managed by a user, usually on the Web. It can efficiently support a learner to manage his or her learning history and keep on learning more to move on to the next level in life so that the learning community becomes more sustainable. This paper explains why e-portfolios are needed to nurture sustainable learning communities. An overview of e-portfolios has been introduced with definitions, advantages, and types of e-portfolios. Furthermore, global trends of e-portfolio applications and Korean activities in e-portfolio applications have been described. Finally, global e-portfolio standardization activities are explained, followed by Korean e-portfolio standardization activities.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2018

Kalthoum Rezgui, Hédia Mhiri and Khaled Ghédira

Since the early 1980s, a paradigm shift, caused by the work undertaken in the field of cognitive psychology, has occurred. This shift is known as the move from…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the early 1980s, a paradigm shift, caused by the work undertaken in the field of cognitive psychology, has occurred. This shift is known as the move from teacher-centered instruction to learner-centered or learning-centered instruction, and emphasizes the importance of building new knowledge on previous ones, interacting with peers, making meaningful and reflective learning and being engaged in his own path to foster learning. This new vision of teaching has created a need for new learning and assessment instruments that are better adapted to these pedagogical realities. In this context, the electronic portfolio or e-portfolio is one of the most versatile and effective tools that have been proposed for this purpose. More specifically, the interest in e-portfolios has grown considerably with the emergence of the competency-based approach and portfolio-based competency assessments. The purpose of this paper is to describe a semantic-based representation of e-portfolios, defined on the basis of official e-portfolio standards and specifications. Moreover, a comparative study of several well-known e-portfolio solutions has been carried out based on different facets, such as functional features, technical and organizational features. The objective is to identify those features that are mostly supported by e-portfolio solution providers and accordingly to gain a fairly accurate idea of the common structure of e-portfolios. In addition, the authors take advantage of an already implemented ontological model describing competency-related characteristics of learners and learning objects and combine it with the e-portfolio ontology, with a view to support a more reliable and authentic competency assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed e-portfolio ontology was built following the ontology development methodology Methontology (Fernandez et al., 1997). In addition, it was constructed using the Protégé ontology environment (Protégé, 2007) and was implemented in OWL (Web Ontology Language) (Antoniou and Harmelen, 2004).

Findings

The proposed e-portfolio ontology provides humans with a shared vocabulary that enables capturing the most important elements in e-portfolios and serves as the basis for the semantic interoperability for machines.

Originality/value

The main advantage of the e-portfolio ontology lies in its ability to provide a common and semantically enriched representation of e-portfolio artifacts, thus facilitating the interoperability and exchange of competency evidences between different learning systems and platforms. In addition, capturing the semantics of e-portfolios helps to make them utilizable by intelligent applications.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Quynh Le

E‐Portfolio is a powerful tool for demonstrating evidence of learning and achievements in graduate research. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept, structure…

Abstract

Purpose

E‐Portfolio is a powerful tool for demonstrating evidence of learning and achievements in graduate research. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept, structure and functions of e‐Portfolio in graduate research and discuss the significance of the role of e‐Portfolio in enhancing the quality of graduate research students and their learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion starts with the concept of e‐Portfolio in the context of modern digital technology and innovative educational perspectives, which emphasise critical thinking, social interaction, task‐based learning, and independent learning.

Findings

It is found that e‐Portfolio greatly enhances three important aspects of research students: academic development, research profile and social networking. E‐Portfolio empowers research students to take full control of their own learning and research journey.

Originality/value

The paper shows that e‐Portfolio contributes to the enhancement of educational practices in terms of moving the teaching and learning focus from supervisor‐centred to student‐centred learning and research, as well as from technological control to technological empowerment.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gary McKenna, Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a semi-experimental study conducted over a period of two years of five degree programmes using a web-based personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a semi-experimental study conducted over a period of two years of five degree programmes using a web-based personal tutoring system to enhance learner engagement and students’ self-efficacy, towards using personal development planning (PDP) e-portfolios.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a semi-experimental approach using quantitative methods utilising a pre- and post-test design in the form of a general self-efficacy questionnaire inventory.

Findings

The study investigated the extent to which using a virtual learning environment web-based personal tutoring system (VLE WBPTS) can impact positively on the learners’ self-efficacy of the students’ undertaking a degree programme which promotes engagement with PDP e-portfolios.

Research limitations/implications

More empirical research is required to establish whether PDP and e-portfolios have a positive effect on students’ perceived self-efficacy. Further testing is required to establish whether the VLE WBPTS can have a positive effect on other beneficial elements associated with PDP and e-portfolio usage such as students: learning styles, learner conscientiousness, reflective thinking and effective learner skills.

Practical implications

The introduction of interventions that involve the utilisation of a VLE WBPTS may have a more significant impact and yield positive results when the period of usage is extended beyond the initial period of six weeks to a minimum period of 12 weeks.

Originality/value

This study was one of few studies to use a pre/post-test design to collect and analyse empirical data about whether a VLE WBPTS can have a positive effect on students’ self-efficacy towards using PDP e-portfolios.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Roslyn Cameron

The use of e‐portfolios in recognition of prior learning (RPL) processes in workplace and professional practice contexts has attracted little attention in the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of e‐portfolios in recognition of prior learning (RPL) processes in workplace and professional practice contexts has attracted little attention in the literature due to its emergent nature. This study seeks to explore the growing incidence of e‐portfolio‐based RPL (e‐RPL) and professional recognition (e‐PR) processes in Australia and the implications this has for recognising workplace learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises an exploratory study and involves a content analysis of a selected sample of data sources. The sample includes the abstracts and papers presented at the 2009 VET E‐portfolios Showcase and the 2010 ePortfolios Australia conference and the Australian Flexible Learning Framework (AFLF) funded E‐portfolio implementation trials 2009 and 2010.

Findings

The paper finds an array of e‐RPL and e‐PR operationalised across multiple fields/disciplines and contexts. The incidence of e‐PR is more dominant than that of e‐RPL. The findings result in the development of a framework that provides the conceptual scaffolding for recognition systems in the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to Australian based data sources. Further analysis could be expanded to international contexts to increase the data and evidence on e‐RPL and e‐PR processes and the implications these have for recognising workplace. The framework developed from the study provides a conceptual launch pad into future lines of inquiry which can critically explore the underlying pedagogies and knowledge paradigms which have dominated in formal learning systems.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the correct matching of practices and tasks to appropriate types of e‐portfolio based RPL and PR along a continuum of formal to informal learning and varying degrees of learner control.

Originality/value

This paper presents an analytical framework for exploring e‐RPL and e‐PR as distinct processes of recognition through a synthesis of RPL and e‐portfolio research and theoretical constructs. The framework includes a typology of e‐RPL and e‐PR based on Smith and Tillema's typology of portfolios and Cameron's models of RPL. The framework will assist in analysing recognition processes undertaken in workplace contexts.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Michael Truong and Anne Zanzucchi

In this chapter, we explore how new technologies, namely, video essays, audio-based feedback, and electronic portfolios, can transform traditional composition curriculum…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore how new technologies, namely, video essays, audio-based feedback, and electronic portfolios, can transform traditional composition curriculum and deepen student learning. We begin by discussing how new technologies connect and enhance learning experiences, especially within writing-intensive courses. For each of the three technologies, we provide a brief literature review, give a local case study, and conclude with suggested applications and related resources.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

Keywords

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