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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Michael Johnson

Recent changes in the UK political landscape have brought about cuts in public sector spending. Local authorities, in common with other public sector agencies, are…

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1922

Abstract

Purpose

Recent changes in the UK political landscape have brought about cuts in public sector spending. Local authorities, in common with other public sector agencies, are required to make significant cost savings over the coming years. Procurement is an area of public sector administration characterised by considerable costs and inefficiency where the adoption of innovative technologies, such as e‐markets, can be deployed to effect significant costs savings. However, there are many barriers to the adoption of such technologies. The purpose of this paper is to explore and expound the factors that impede local authorities from adopting e‐markets and to present a learning opportunity for procurement managers and other stakeholders involved in technology adoption in local government and the wider public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study based on in depth interviews with 17 senior level executives in e‐markets and local authorities on barriers to e‐market adoption in the local government sector is presented. The interviews were transcribed and subsequently coded and analysed using the qualitative data analysis software QSR N6.

Findings

A number of factors (risk perception, knowledge deficits, trust, firm size, and organisational readiness) pertaining to Johnson's framework of e‐market adoption barriers were found to affect e‐market adoption and use in the local government sector. Importantly, the study also found factors that are idiosyncratic to the sector that impinged on e‐market adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the study is limited to examining such barriers from a buy‐side local authority perspective, the findings of which may have implications for the adoption of e‐markets and other e‐procurement technologies in the wider public sector and beyond. The paper also makes a contribution to the literature on e‐market adoption by adding to the body of knowledge relating to institutional theory.

Practical implications

The case study can help local authority and other public sector procurement managers, academic researchers, practitioners, consultants and other professionals involved in technology adoption better understand, and find practical ways to offset, the barriers that impinge on the adoption of e‐markets and other innovative technologies that can reduce costs within public sector organisations.

Originality/value

E‐market adoption has the potential to realise a number of significant cost saving benefits within and between organisations. However, such benefits cannot be realised if there are barriers to their adoption and full utilisation. To date, research on the dynamics of e‐market adoption has largely focused on private sector enterprises with few studies examining this phenomenon in public sector environments. Therefore, e‐market adoption in the public sector has received limited attention in the literature over the past decade. This study examines, and provides empirical evidence of, barriers to e‐market uptake and usage in the local government sector in order to act as a starting point to creating better understanding of such barriers among academic and practitioner audiences.

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Michael Johnson

The objective of this paper is to explore and determine a set of factors that are critical to the success of business‐to‐business (B2B) e‐markets in the aerospace and…

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3248

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to explore and determine a set of factors that are critical to the success of business‐to‐business (B2B) e‐markets in the aerospace and defence, healthcare, higher education and local government industry sectors, in order to advance our current understanding of what factors facilitate e‐market adoption and success. The paper examines critical success factors (CSFs) for e‐markets from a strategic fit perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a semi‐inductive qualitative approach based on a review of the literature, followed by a pilot study and 58 indepth semi‐structured interviews with senior level executives in buyer, supplier, e‐market and third‐party organisations. Qualitative data analysis software, QSR N6, was used to code and analyse the interview data for citations that corresponded with the candidate e‐market CSFs that had been identified either in the literature, pilot study or during the course of the interviews with respondents. The CSFs for e‐markets were ranked by the frequency of respondents citing a particular CSF.

Findings

The study found eight factors that are critical to e‐market success and four factors (critical mass, integration issues, value proposition, and leadership participation) were found to be conducive to e‐market success in all four industry sectors. Likewise, four factors (industry knowledge, revenue model, branding and reputation, and rich content) were found to be only conducive to e‐market success in three of the four industry sectors.

Practical implications

The paper can help academic researchers, managers, consultants, practitioners and other professionals better understand what factors are critical to the success of e‐markets and other online enterprises operating in the B2B marketspace.

Originality/value

There have been numerous calls for more empirical research on the dynamics of e‐market adoption for more than a decade. To date, research on the CSFs for e‐markets has been largely anecdotal and sporadic with a paucity of studies noting factors that are likely to be favourable to e‐market success. This study addresses the call for more research on e‐markets and imparts empirical evidence on factors that are perceived to be conducive to the success of e‐markets. It contributes to the base of knowledge on e‐markets by relating the concept of CSFs with the theory of strategic fit as, to date, no known study has examined CSFs for e‐markets from a strategic fit perspective. The study also presents the benefits capabilities‐industry participants’ needs fit conceptual model as a precursor for theory building in future studies on B2B e‐markets and informs stakeholders involved in developing e‐markets or other online B2B ventures to better comprehend the conditions and determinants of success.

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Michael Johnson

The objective of this paper is to explore and determine a set of factors that are critical to the success of business-to-business (B2B) e-markets in the aerospace and…

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2460

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to explore and determine a set of factors that are critical to the success of business-to-business (B2B) e-markets in the aerospace and defence, healthcare, higher education and local government industry sectors, in order to advance our current understanding of what factors facilitate e-market adoption and success. The paper examines critical success factors (CSFs) for e-markets from a strategic fit perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a semi-inductive qualitative approach based on a review of the literature, followed by a pilot study and 58 indepth semi-structured interviews with senior level executives in buyer, supplier, e-market and third-party organisations. Qualitative data analysis software, QSR N6, was used to code and analyse the interview data for citations that corresponded with the candidate e-market CSFs that had been identified either in the literature, pilot study or during the course of the interviews with respondents. The CSFs for e-markets were ranked by the frequency of respondents citing a particular CSF.

Findings

The study found eight factors that are critical to e-market success and four factors (critical mass, integration issues, value proposition, and leadership participation) were found to be conducive to e-market success in all four industry sectors. Likewise, four factors (industry knowledge, revenue model, branding and reputation, and rich content) were found to be only conducive to e-market success in three of the four industry sectors.

Practical implications

The paper can help academic researchers, managers, consultants, practitioners and other professionals better understand what factors are critical to the success of e-markets and other online enterprises operating in the B2B marketspace.

Originality/value

There have been numerous calls for more empirical research on the dynamics of e-market adoption for more than a decade. To date, research on the CSFs for e-markets has been largely anecdotal and sporadic with a paucity of studies noting factors that are likely to be favourable to e-market success. This study addresses the call for more research on e-markets and imparts empirical evidence on factors that are perceived to be conducive to the success of e-markets. It contributes to the base of knowledge on e-markets by relating the concept of CSFs with the theory of strategic fit as, to date, no known study has examined CSFs for e-markets from a strategic fit perspective. The study also presents the benefits capabilities-industry participants’ needs fit conceptual model as a precursor for theory building in future studies on B2B e-markets and informs stakeholders involved in developing e-markets or other online B2B ventures to better comprehend the conditions and determinants of success.

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Zahir Irani, Yogesh Dwivedi and Muhammad Kamal

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124

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Zahir Irani and Muhammad Kamal

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177

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2020

Sunil Nandankar and Amit Sachan

Despite the substantial research in the domain of electronic procurement adoption, usage and performance (EP AUP), there is no structured review of these studies and most…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the substantial research in the domain of electronic procurement adoption, usage and performance (EP AUP), there is no structured review of these studies and most of the literature is in fragmented form. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate and synthesize EP AUP research in the past two decades and map key research approaches, prevailing theories and antecedents used by researchers to study EP AUP at the individual user and organizational level.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate and comprehend past and current patterns/themes in the EP AUP research area, a systematic literature review is undertaken. Significant peer-reviewed studies covering three categories – adoption, usage and performance and seven classification criteria are critically reviewed.

Findings

The findings reveal that most investigators mainly used “technology acceptance model,” “technology–organization–environment” framework and their extensions, demonstrating that “perceived ease of use,” “perceived usefulness,” “trust,” “organizational size,” “organizational readiness” and “behavioral intentions” are the most critical drivers of EP AUP.

Research limitations/implications

For researchers and practitioners, the review highlights a taxonomy of contextual factors to be considered for successful EP AUP. It further makes suggestions for future research meeting challenges of Industry-4.0.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first systematic literature review undertaken in the field of EP that studies it from three different perspectives. It further builds on the determinants of EP AUP and classifies them in four distinct categories: organizational, individual, information system level and environmental.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Michael Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to explore and expound the factors that impinge on the adoption and usage of industrial e‐markets.

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4266

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and expound the factors that impinge on the adoption and usage of industrial e‐markets.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature on e‐market adoption was followed by in‐depth interviews with senior managers in buyer, supplier, and e‐market organisations. Senior level executives (15) reported barriers and challenges to the adoption and usage of e‐markets operating in the aerospace and defence and higher education sectors. The interview data is transcribed, coded and analysed using the qualitative data analysis programme QSR N6.

Findings

The paper found a number of barriers and challenges related risk perception, knowledge deficits, trust, firm size, and organisational readiness that moderate the adoption and usage of e‐markets in the sectors.

Research limitations/implications

There is unequal representation of buyer and supplier organisations between the two e‐market sectors. However, the case material enabled the research question to be answered and did not compromise the aims of the research.

Practical implications

The case material presented in the paper can help academic researchers, managers, practitioners and other professionals better understand the barriers that impinge on e‐market adoption and find practical ways to mitigate those barriers.

Originality/value

Recently, research on the barriers and challenges to e‐markets has been largely anecdotal and patchy with a paucity of studies noting factors that are likely to be conducive to e‐markets success. This study departs from such studies by offering empirical evidence of the factors in moderating the uptake of e‐markets.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 110 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Mahmud Akhtar Shareef, Vinod Kumar, Uma Kumar and Yogesh Dwivedi

– The purpose of this paper is to identify and model adoption criteria of citizens for electronic-government (eGov) service at the transaction maturity stage.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and model adoption criteria of citizens for electronic-government (eGov) service at the transaction maturity stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study was conducted among the citizens of Ontario, Canada who have experience of using Canadian e-Gov system.

Findings

From statistical analysis through LISREL, this study revealed that ability to use and assurance to use are the critical factors for adoption of eGov at the transaction phase (GAM-T).

Originality/value

The findings of this research can be considered as original as this paper concludes that eGov functional characteristics are not only different at different levels of service maturity, but adoption factors at different levels of service maturity are also potentially different. From static to interaction to transaction, citizens perceive different factors to be important for creating the behavioral attitude and intention to accept the eGov system and to use it.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Xiaoxia Duan, Hepu Deng and Brian Corbitt

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical investigation of the critical determinants for the adoption of e‐market in Australian small‐and‐medium sized…

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1552

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical investigation of the critical determinants for the adoption of e‐market in Australian small‐and‐medium sized enterprises (SMEs) within the technology‐organization‐environment (TOE) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is proposed for better understanding the adoption of e‐market in Australian SMEs. Structural equation modelling is used for testing and validating the proposed conceptual model based on the survey data collected from Australian SMEs. A logistic regression analysis is conducted for identifying the relationship between the critical determinants and the adoption of e‐market in Australian SMEs.

Findings

A positive relationship is identified between the perceived direct benefit, top management support, external pressure, trust and the adoption of e‐market in Australian SMEs. The top management support emerges as the most critical determinant. The perceived indirect benefit, size and organization readiness, however, do not show a significant influence on the adoption of e‐market in Australian SMEs.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the investigation of the critical determinants in the adoption of e‐market in Australian SMEs. In order to gain an holistic understanding of the e‐market adoption in Australian SMEs, the impact of adopting e‐market on the performance of SMEs should be examined. Furthermore, this study does not distinguish the adoption of e‐market in SMEs between Australian metropolitan and rural areas. SMEs located in rural areas by the nature and location own specific characteristics such as a limited access to resources and less influenced by external pressure. The issues of their concern in the adoption of e‐market might be different from those located in metropolitan areas.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the e‐market adoption research in proposing and validating a research model for the e‐market adoption within the TOE framework, and by highlighting the criticality of the determinants of adopting e‐market in Australian SMEs.

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Hepu Deng, Sophia Xiaoxia Duan and Feng Luo

Understanding the critical determinants for the adoption of electronic markets (e-markets) is significant for the development of sustainable electronic business. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the critical determinants for the adoption of electronic markets (e-markets) is significant for the development of sustainable electronic business. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical determinants for the adoption of e-markets in Australian small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) for electronic business.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of the related studies is conducted. That leads to the development of a conceptual model for exploring the critical determinants for the adoption of e-markets in Australian SMEs. Such a model is then tested and validated using structural equation modelling on the survey data collected, leading to the identification of the critical determinants for e-market adoption in Australian SMEs.

Findings

The study reveals that perceived direct benefit, perceived trust, top management support and external pressures are critical for the adoption of e-markets in Australian SMEs. Perceived indirect benefit and organization readiness are insignificant for the adoption of e-markets.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing electronic business research by enriching the understanding of the critical determinants for the adoption of e-markets in Australian SMEs. Such a study provides government departments, e-market operators and SMEs with practical guidelines for the better use of e-markets in electronic business.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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