Search results

1 – 10 of 29
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Sunhee Kim, Yumi Hwang, Daejin Shin, Chang-Yeal Yang, Seung-Yeun Lee, Jin Kim, Byunggoo Kong, Jio Chung, Namhyun Cho, Ji-Hwan Kim and Minhwa Chung

This paper describes the development process of a mobile Voice User Interface (VUI) for Korean users with dysarthria with currently available speech recognition technology…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the development process of a mobile Voice User Interface (VUI) for Korean users with dysarthria with currently available speech recognition technology by conducting systematic user needs analysis and applying usability testing feedback to prototype system designs.

Design/methodology/approach

Four usability surveys are conducted for the development of the prototype system. According to the two surveys on user needs and user experiences with existing VUI systems at the stage of the prototype design, the target platforms, and target applications are determined. Furthermore, a set of basic words is selected by the prospective users, which enables the system to be not only custom designed for dysarthric speakers but also individualized for each user. Reflecting the requests relating to general usage of the VUI and the UI design preference of users through evaluation of the initial prototype, we develop the final prototype, which is an individualized voice keyboard for mobile devices based on an isolated word recognition engine with word prediction.

Findings

The results of this paper show that target user participation in system development is effective for improving usability and satisfaction of the system, as the system is developed considering various ideas and feedback obtained in each development stage from different prospective users.

Originality/value

We have developed an automatic speech recognition-based mobile VUI system not only custom designed for dysarthric speakers but also individualized for each user, focussing on the usability aspect through four usability surveys. This voice keyboard system has the potential to be an assistive and alternative input method for people with speech impairment, including mild to moderate dysarthria, and people with physical disabilities.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Foad Hamidi, Melanie Baljko, Connie Ecomomopoulos, Nigel J. Livingston and Leonhard G. Spalteholz

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of CanSpeak which is an open-source speech interface for users with dysarthria of speech. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of CanSpeak which is an open-source speech interface for users with dysarthria of speech. The interface can be customized by each user to map a small number of words they can speak clearly to commands in the computer system, thereby adding a new modality to their interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The interface was developed in two phases: in the first phase, the authors used participatory design to engage the users and their community in the customization of the system, and in the second phase, we used a more focussed co-design methodology during which a user of the system became a co-designer by directly making new design decisions about the system.

Findings

The study showed that it is important to include assistive technology users and their community in the design and customization of technology. Participation led to increased engagement, adoption and also provided new ideas that were rooted in the experience of the user.

Originality/value

The co-design phase of the project provided an opportunity for the researchers to work closely with a user of their system and include her in design decisions. The study showed that by employing co-design new insights into the design domain can be revealed and incorporated into the design that might not be revealed otherwise.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Dhanalakshmi M., Nagarajan T. and Vijayalakshmi P.

Dysarthria is a neuromotor speech disorder caused by neuromuscular disturbances that affect one or more articulators resulting in unintelligible speech. Though…

Abstract

Purpose

Dysarthria is a neuromotor speech disorder caused by neuromuscular disturbances that affect one or more articulators resulting in unintelligible speech. Though inter-phoneme articulatory variations are well captured by formant frequency-based acoustic features, these variations are expected to be much higher for dysarthric speakers than normal. These substantial variations can be well captured by placing sensors in appropriate articulatory position. This study focuses to determine a set of articulatory sensors and parameters in order to assess articulatory dysfunctions in dysarthric speech.

Design/methodology/approach

The current work aims to determine significant sensors and parameters associated using motion path and correlation analyzes on the TORGO database of dysarthric speech. Among eight informative sensor channels and six parameters per channel in positional data, the sensors such as tongue middle, back and tip, lower and upper lips and parameters (y, z, φ) are found to contribute significantly toward capturing the articulatory information. Acoustic and positional data analyzes are performed to validate these identified significant sensors. Furthermore, a convolutional neural network-based classifier is developed for both phone-and word-level classification of dysarthric speech using acoustic and positional data.

Findings

The average phone error rate is observed to be lower, up to 15.54% for positional data when compared with acoustic-only data. Further, word-level classification using a combination of both acoustic and positional information is performed to study that the positional data acquired using significant sensors will boost the performance of classification even for severe dysarthric speakers.

Originality/value

The proposed work shows that the significant sensors and parameters can be used to assess dysfunctions in dysarthric speech effectively. The articulatory sensor data helps in better assessment than the acoustic data even for severe dysarthric speakers.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2011

Satasha L. Green and Christine M. Scott

Writings about language and speech impairments (SLI) have been present for many centuries (Smith, 2004). Unfortunately, early historical accounts tended to reflect…

Abstract

Writings about language and speech impairments (SLI) have been present for many centuries (Smith, 2004). Unfortunately, early historical accounts tended to reflect negatively upon individuals with SLI. For example, Van Riper and Erickson (1996) related that during the Roman times, an individual who stuttered was placed into a cage for entertainment purposes. According to these authors, citizens passing would throw coins into the person's cage to get him to talk. During the late 1800s, the profession of speech-language pathology began as an avocation of certain professionals, notably doctors, educators, and elocutionists (public speakers), who were interested in helping others improve their speech. American doctors studied under the auspices of European doctors who treated people with communication disorders. The two most common disorders that were treated then were dysfluency (stuttering) and speech sound errors (articulation) (Duchan, 2002). Treatment was available for the above disorders, however, the programs were not in public schools and the results of intervention were mixed (Smith, 2004).

Details

History of Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-629-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Rebecca Palmer, Pam Enderby and Mark Hawley

This paper discusses the opinions of people who use communication aids regarding the development of a voice input voice output communication aid (VIVOCA) using speech

Abstract

This paper discusses the opinions of people who use communication aids regarding the development of a voice input voice output communication aid (VIVOCA) using speech recognition technology. It uniquely combines the views of users of communication aids with those of speech and language therapists. Semi structured questionnaires were completed by 12 users of communication aids and 34 speech and language therapists discussed the concept of a VIVOCA in three focus groups. A thematic analysis of the information was carried out. Input, output and hardware requirements are discussed leading to specifications that therapists and users perceive would be required for a VIVOCA.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Rita L. Bailey

This chapter provides an overview of speech-language pathology including education and training requirements of the field of speech-language pathology and the typical role…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of speech-language pathology including education and training requirements of the field of speech-language pathology and the typical role that speech-language pathologists play as members of school-based teams serving children with speech-language-hearing related delays and disorders. A description of the primary areas of treatment is provided along with suggestions for how collaboration with additional team members and families are involved in school-based intervention plans.

Details

Interdisciplinary Connections to Special Education: Key Related Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-663-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Anna van der Gaag, Philip McLoone and Dot Reid

This paper provides managers and clinicians with an analysis of routine data collected by seven speech and language therapy services in the UK. Managers in seven districts…

Abstract

This paper provides managers and clinicians with an analysis of routine data collected by seven speech and language therapy services in the UK. Managers in seven districts in the UK of varying size and location were asked to provide information on referrals, waiting times and attendances during the six month period, and to give a breakdown of the types of intervention offered and type of clients seen. These data were aggregated and comparisons were made with existing data on speech and language therapy services. The results revealed considerable variations in prevalence, staffing ratios and client management practices. The implications for service planning are discussed.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 March 2011

Simon Judge, Zoë Robertson and Mark Hawley

This study set out to collect data from assistive technology professionals about their provision of speech‐driven environmental control systems. This study is part of a…

Abstract

This study set out to collect data from assistive technology professionals about their provision of speech‐driven environmental control systems. This study is part of a larger study looking at developing a new speech‐driven environmental control system. A focus group for assistive technology professionals was conducted. This focus group was recorded, transcribed and then analysed using a framework approach. The analysis suggested that professionals have a ‘mental model’ of a successful user of a speech‐driven system and that in general they consider such systems either as a ‘last resort’ or to work in parallel with another system as a back‐up. Perceived poor reliability was highlighted as a major influence in the provision of speech‐driven environmental control systems although there were also positive perceptions about the use of speech under controlled circumstances. Comparison with published data from end‐users showed that professionals highlighted the majority of issues identified by end‐users. Assistive technology professionals think that speech has potential as an access method but are cautious about using speech‐driven environmental control systems predominantly due to concerns about reliability. Professionals seem able to empathise well with the challenges faced by end‐users in use of these systems.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Inna Shpilko

This article aggregates and reviews the disparate information needed to assess journal literature related to communication disorders both directly and peripherally. An…

Abstract

This article aggregates and reviews the disparate information needed to assess journal literature related to communication disorders both directly and peripherally. An extensive analysis was performed using a list of 40 journals on communication disorders derived from a review of selected libraries’ journal collections, and then compared to entries in respected indexes and bibliographies covering this discipline. The result of this analysis is a list providing comprehensive information including scope and coverage, publisher information, indexing/abstracting data, and online availability for those 40 journals. In addition, a survey was conducted among communication disorders faculty in the City University of New York (CUNY) to investigate which professional journals are used regularly for current awareness and for clinical/research information. The information presented in this article should be of interest to faculty, students and practitioners in this area, as well as subject librarians responsible for collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Katherine M. Tsui, Eric McCann, Amelia McHugh, Mikhail Medvedev, Holly A. Yanco, David Kontak and Jill L. Drury

The authors believe that people with cognitive and motor impairments may benefit from using of telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these systems…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors believe that people with cognitive and motor impairments may benefit from using of telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these systems have not been designed for use by people with disabilities as the robot operators. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two formative evaluations using a participatory action design process. First, the authors conducted a focus group (n=5) to investigate how members of the target audience would want to direct a telepresence robot in a remote environment using speech. The authors then conducted a follow-on experiment in which participants (n=12) used a telepresence robot or directed a human in a scavenger hunt task.

Findings

The authors collected a corpus of 312 utterances (first hand as opposed to speculative) relating to spatial navigation. Overall, the analysis of the corpus supported several speculations put forth during the focus group. Further, it showed few statistically significant differences between speech used in the human and robot agent conditions; thus, the authors believe that, for the task of directing a telepresence robot's movements in a remote environment, people will speak to the robot in a manner similar to speaking to another person.

Practical implications

Based upon the two formative evaluations, the authors present four guidelines for designing speech-based interfaces for telepresence robots.

Originality/value

Robot systems designed for general use do not typically consider people with disabilities. The work is a first step towards having our target population take the active role of the telepresence robot operator.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 29