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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of job satisfaction in the relationship between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and burnout, turnover intentions…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of job satisfaction in the relationship between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and burnout, turnover intentions, and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 323 full-time employees in the small developing country in the Caribbean, this survey study tested a mediation model with job satisfaction depicting the relationship between ERI and various outcome variables. The model was compared to a partial mediation model.

Findings

The structural equation modelling (SEM) results revealed that the partial mediating model was superior to the full mediation model, suggesting that job satisfaction plays only a partial role in mediating the relationships between ERI and burnout, turnover intentions, and mental health.

Research limitations/implications

The study presents a cross-sectional approach to model testing but the study controlled for CMV statistically using the common latent factor approach within latent SEM procedures.

Practical implications

Organisations should ensure that employees’ efforts are appropriately and fairly rewarded as a means of reducing negative ERIs which can have adverse consequences on the physical and mental health of employees.

Originality/value

Using latent SEM procedures and statistical controls for CMV, the study examined job satisfaction as a potential mediator in a popular stressor-strain model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether person-related bullying, work-related bullying, and physically intimidating bullying predict three forms of job strain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether person-related bullying, work-related bullying, and physically intimidating bullying predict three forms of job strain: physical exhaustion, work-related depression, and interpersonal counterproductive work behaviour (CWB-P).

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveyed a wide cross-section of employees across a number of private sector organisations in a small developing country in the Caribbean region.

Findings

The prevalence rate of workplace bullying in the current Caribbean sample was 54 per cent. The regression results revealed that person-related bullying and work-related were positively related to work-related depression, whereas physically intimidating bullying and work-related bullying were positively related to CWB-P. None of the three forms of bullying predicted physical exhaustion. When the overall workplace bullying composite was used, all three job strains were significantly predicted.

Research limitations/implications

The study utilised a cross-sectional self-report survey research design which does not permit causal inferences to be made. Common method variance is a possible limitation due to the use of self-report measure but this was ruled out by a Harman’s single factor test. Longitudinal research using a mixture of subjective and objective measures is needed to further investigate these relationships reported here.

Practical implications

First, social and interpersonal skills and emotional intelligence training and development opportunities should be provided to both managers and employees as a means of developing individuals who are socially aware, interpersonally competent, and emotionally intelligent in their interactions with each other at work. Second, a zero-tolerance approach should be communicated throughout the organisation evidenced by clear and explicit organisational policies against these acts. Third, it would be of good practical value to establish health and safety committees to identify, assess and tackle various psychosocial and other hazards at work (e.g. workplace bullying).

Originality/value

The study utilised a three-dimensional model of bullying at work (as well as a composite form of bullying) for predicting three forms of job strains among employees in various Caribbean workplaces.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this study is to examine gender as a key moderator in the relationship between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and burnout among employees in Caribbean workplaces.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine gender as a key moderator in the relationship between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and burnout among employees in Caribbean workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey sample of 323 employees in a small developing country in the Caribbean, this study tested the hypothesis that the stressor–strain relationship (captured by ERI and burnout) is stronger for women than for men.

Findings

The results revealed that the effect of high effort-low rewards (i.e. ERI) on burnout among females was significantly larger than its effect on burnout for males. In contrast, high effort-high rewards were significantly associated with higher burnout levels for males.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a cross-sectional approach using self-report measures of burnout, effort and rewards.

Practical implications

Management in organisations should ensure that male and female employees’ efforts and contributions at work are appropriately and fairly rewarded as a means of reducing negative effects of ERIs.

Originality/value

The study examined how gender moderated the adverse effects of a popular work-stress model on employee health in a developing country context.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of private and public sector managers in Barbados regarding the concepts of mental health and illness at work. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of private and public sector managers in Barbados regarding the concepts of mental health and illness at work. It also explored their interactions and experiences with persons with mental illness at work and various forms of support and resources needed to improve the overall management of these persons within the organisational setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study used an exploratory research design based on two focus groups of private and public sector managers.

Findings

The findings revealed that both private and public sector managers understood the distinction between the concepts of mental health and mental illness. However, managers believed that high levels of stigma and discrimination exist in both private and public sector workplaces due to a lack of understanding of mental illness, cultural norms, and socialisation in Barbados regarding mental illness and negative stereotypes. However, workplace education and promotion, associated workplace policies, and employee assistance programmes (EAPs) were identified as key strategies for effectively addressing issues of mental health stigma and the management of persons with mental illness at work.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the qualitative approach used and small sample selected based on non-probability sampling, generalising the findings to larger populations is heavily cautioned.

Practical implications

Organisations in both private and public sectors should emphasise workplace mental health interventions such as mental health education and awareness, the development and implementation of supportive and flexible policies, and EAPs. These strategies are likely to help destigmatisation efforts and enhance managers’ understanding of mental health and the management of persons with mental illness.

Originality/value

This study provided a rich and in-depth understanding of mental health and illness from the perspective of private and public sector managers in a small developing country in the Caribbean. The Caribbean region possesses a dearth of empirical research concerning issues of mental health and illness at work.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to test the mediating roles of two dimensions of psychological well-being (job satisfaction and work-related depression) in the relationship…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the mediating roles of two dimensions of psychological well-being (job satisfaction and work-related depression) in the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and task performance, individual-targeted citizenship behaviours (OCB-I) and organisation-targeted citizenship behaviours (OCB-O).

Design/methodology/approach

This survey study of 262 employees in a small island territory in the Caribbean captured data on EI, psychological well-being and various dimensions of job performance. Multiple mediation hypotheses were tested using the 95 per cent bootstrapping confidence interval (CI) estimation approach.

Findings

The results revealed that job satisfaction and work-related depression mediated the relationship between EI and task performance; and the relationship between EI and OCB-O, but only work-related depression mediated the relationship between EI and OCB-I.

Research limitations/implications

The study utilised a cross-sectional study design and self-reported measures but still presented significant implications for existing and future theoretical models of EI and job performance.

Practical implications

Organisations should seek to develop high levels of EI in their employees as a means of improving their overall psychological health and well-being and performance behaviours at work.

Originality/value

The study examines multiple mediation of various psychological well-being dimensions in the EI-job performance relationship using the 95 per cent bootstrapping CI approach.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Kevin Rui-Han Teoh, Iain Coyne, Dwayne Devonish, Phil Leather and Antonio Zarola

The purpose of this paper is to use social exchange theory (SET) to examine a model where supportive and unsupportive manager behaviors (SMB and UMB) interact to predict…

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3042

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use social exchange theory (SET) to examine a model where supportive and unsupportive manager behaviors (SMB and UMB) interact to predict employees’ engagement, job satisfaction and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey collected data from 252 UK-based employees of a global data management company.

Findings

Factor analysis confirmed manager behaviors to consist of two constructs: supportive and unsupportive behaviors. Structural equation modeling indicated SMB predicted job satisfaction and turnover intentions, but not engagement. Job satisfaction, but not engagement, mediated the SMB-turnover intention relationship. UMB only predicted job dissatisfaction. Neither job satisfaction nor engagement mediated the UMB-turnover intention relationship. UMB undermined the positive relationship between SMB and turnover intention.

Practical implications

The behaviors assessed can be integrated into various stages of a manager’s development process to serve as guidelines of good practice. Crucially, findings suggest managers can exhibit both supportive and unsupportive behaviors, and that consistency in behaviors is important. The study also provides evidence that supportive managers can help reduce turnover intention through job satisfaction.

Originality/value

SET was used as a framework for SMB, UMB and engagement. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study to examine the interaction between SMB and UMB.

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Dwayne Devonish, Anne Kouvonen and Iain Coyne

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediational effects of positive and negative emotions in the relationship between organisational justice and health.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediational effects of positive and negative emotions in the relationship between organisational justice and health.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐sectional research obtained data from 206 workers employed within the financial/banking, manufacturing, and retail industries in Barbados.

Findings

Structural equation modelling analyses revealed that positive and negative emotions completely mediated the effects of relational justice (but not procedural justice) on overall health.

Research limitations/implications

Research was cross‐sectional, and relied on self‐report measures. The findings suggest that employers must properly evaluate their health and safety policies and practices in the organisation to ensure that aspects of the psychosocial work environment are being properly implemented, managed, and monitored, to ensure that individuals’ health and well‐being are not at risk.

Originality/value

The paper represents a first attempt to investigate the roles of positive and negative emotions in the justice‐health relationship in a different cultural context such as the Caribbean. Justice has been rarely researched as a psychosocial work stressor. The study described in the paper focused on multiple health outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Cristina Jönsson and Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine a typology of competitive strategies, which has not been extensively researched in the context of the accommodation sector in…

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3252

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a typology of competitive strategies, which has not been extensively researched in the context of the accommodation sector in Barbados, a small developing island state in the Caribbean.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is collected through self‐administered questionnaires from 51 per cent of the hotels in Barbados. Respondents are Human Resource Managers, General Managers or Managing Directors.

Findings

Hotels in the five‐star and higher category place substantial strategic focus in the area of defining service standards and performance, as compared with hotels in the one‐star category. This study suggests that hoteliers should focus on a combination of different strategies advanced by Vandermerwe et al. as a means of securing a competitive advantage. Changes in strategy should be accompanied by training employees as the service and the quality of hotels change. As their customers' demands change, and as the competition changes, the competitive strategies of hotels will change.

Research limitations/implications

Due to cultural differences among the islands in the Caribbean, the findings in this study need to be confirmed by undertaking similar investigations in other islands. Future research should consider the use of a more qualitative approach to better understand the nature of these competitive strategies in the hotel sector. Future research should examine the link between these strategies and company performance in order to determine the best combination of competitive strategies needed for maximum organisational performance.

Practical implications

This study highlights many challenges to be met and opportunities to be seized by managers in Barbados's accommodation sector. Systematically linking different strategies highlighted by Vandermerwe et al. and proactively managing the hotel is one way to do both.

Originality/value

Few studies in this area have been undertaken in small developing island states in the Caribbean. This study attempts to fill this gap by comparing and contrasting the competitive business strategies employed by hotels in Barbados.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine workplace bullying as a potential moderator (or exacerbator) in the relationship between job demands and physical, mental and…

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2843

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine workplace bullying as a potential moderator (or exacerbator) in the relationship between job demands and physical, mental and behavioral strain.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from a cross-section of 262 employees were collected using a range of measures and hierarchical moderated regressions were performed to examine the interactive effects of job demands and workplace bullying on physical exhaustion, depression, and medically certified and uncertified absenteeism.

Findings

The results revealed that workplace bullying significantly exacerbated the effects of job demands on physical exhaustion, depression, and uncertified absenteeism.

Research limitations/implications

The study utilized a cross-sectional self-report survey research design which does not permit causal inferences to be made. Longitudinal research is needed to further investigate these relationships reported here.

Practical implications

Managers should seek to minimize workplace bullying as well as excessive job demands to help alleviate the risk of employees developing negative health outcomes.

Originality/value

The study investigated how different categories of stressors interact with each other to predict various health outcomes or forms of job strains.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether two factors of affective psychological well-being, job satisfaction, and work-related depression, play a role in mediating…

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9588

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether two factors of affective psychological well-being, job satisfaction, and work-related depression, play a role in mediating the relationship between workplace bullying as a social stressor at work and three forms of employee performance or behaviors: task performance, individual-targeted citizenship behavior (OCB-I), and interpersonal counterproductive work behavior (CWB-P).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a cross-sectional survey research design which captured a sample of 262 employees across a number of organizations in a small developing country in the Caribbean region.

Findings

The findings revealed that job satisfaction alone partially mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and task performance, whereas work-related depression alone partially mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and OCB-I. Both job satisfaction and work-related depression partially mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and CWB-P.

Research limitations/implications

The paper utilized a cross-sectional self-report survey research design which does not permit causal inferences to be made. Longitudinal research is needed to further investigate these relationships reported here.

Practical implications

Management must seek to deal with the emergence of workplace bullying through their human resource management policies and practices as well as encouraging positive interpersonal work climates and cultures among employees.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to investigate how various elements of psychological well-being can serve to mediate the relationship between workplace bullying and performance outcomes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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