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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Amal M.H. Abdel-Haleem, Henar A. Seleem and Wafaa K. Galal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential quality of Kamut® (triticum turgidum turanicum) as an ancient relative of modern durum wheat for food preparation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential quality of Kamut® (triticum turgidum turanicum) as an ancient relative of modern durum wheat for food preparation and Egyptian consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology included in this paper is based on quality evaluation of Kamut wheat of the Dashure-Fayume geographical origin physically, chemically and technologically compared to Beni Suef 1, Beni Suef 3 and Suhag 3, the most dominant durum varieties in Egypt. After that, producing a specific end product (traditional couscous) regarded the critical quality aspects in Kamut wheat.

Findings

The results obtained showed that Kamut grains had higher physical properties indicating higher milling yield potential. Besides, Kamut flour was remarkable with higher protein and oil content. The use of a farinograph for assessing the rheological properties of Kamut dough has proven a useful quality for its measured characteristics compared to the Egyptian durum varieties. The good physical and rheological properties, coupled with high protein content, validated that Kamut is a valuable addition to the Egyptian diet and suited for the production of pasta and/or couscous. The sensory attributes of traditional couscous were significantly (p < 0.05) highly acceptable to the panelists.

Originality/value

These results lead to valuable addition and improvement of the Egyptian diet which consider The Sustainable Agricultural Development Strategy (SADS) towards 2030 in Egypt based on achieving higher rates of food security in strategic goods in regard to improve food quality and safety, especially Kamut wheat which produces high quality grains without artificial fertilizers and pesticides.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 2016

Marco Formentini, ManMohan S. Sodhi and Christopher S. Tang

We investigate the innovative supply chain contracts developed and implemented by Barilla, the leading Italian pasta company, in sourcing high-quality durum wheat from…

Abstract

Purpose

We investigate the innovative supply chain contracts developed and implemented by Barilla, the leading Italian pasta company, in sourcing high-quality durum wheat from farmers in Northern Italy in the Emilia Romagna region.

Methodology/approach

Using case study techniques to gather information, we captured the evolution of the supply chain contracts adopted by Barilla. We gained information mainly through semi-structured interviews with Barilla’s managers, co-op and consortium managers representing farmers, Barilla’s quantitative data related to contracts’ elements and structure, preliminary experimental results, agri-business magazines, industry reports, and academic literature.

Findings

These contracts helped the company improve not only its long-term profits and strategic objectives such as supply security, but also the farmers’ income as well as environmental sustainability, thus providing triple bottom line benefits.

Originality/value

We investigate how Barilla and its suppliers – with the support of additional stakeholders, such as regional institutions – combine in their innovative contracts fixed and market-based prices as well as quality and sustainability-based premiums for desired triple bottom line benefits.

Details

Organizing Supply Chain Processes for Sustainable Innovation in the Agri-Food Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-488-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Claudia Dumitrescu, William Nganje and Clifford J. Shultz

This study aims to provide international pasta marketers with a better understanding of how consumers perceive product value, which enables them to create and deliver…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide international pasta marketers with a better understanding of how consumers perceive product value, which enables them to create and deliver value. The effects of COO, price, and content on purchase intentions are assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via the survey method in Romania and Greece. Using a random utility discrete choice model, the authors test five hypotheses.

Findings

Overall, Romanian and Greek individuals are less likely to buy US pasta; nevertheless, the likelihood that US or Italian pasta is purchased increases when this product is made from durum wheat versus soft wheat. Differences in purchase intentions due to age, gender, education, income, and nationality are also found.

Research limitations/implications

The results have important implications for international pasta marketers, as it helps them to better understand the perceived pasta value and to position this product effectively in Greek and Romanian markets. Future studies should examine wider pasta market segmentation in the Balkans.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the value literature by providing a framework of perceived value of foreign food products. Also, addressing concerns expressed in the literature, this study examines the COO effects on purchase intentions in a multi-cue context, focusing on low-involvement food products such as pasta. Because individual preferences for COO vary widely, the need for empirical evidence to complement theory is critical, and this is the first study with regard to Greek and Romanian consumers' intentions to buy foreign pasta.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Andrew Schmitz and Hartley Furtan

The U.S. 2002 Farm Bill provides sizeable direct and indirect subsidies to U.S. farmers, which has created increased competition in markets where the United States and…

Abstract

The U.S. 2002 Farm Bill provides sizeable direct and indirect subsidies to U.S. farmers, which has created increased competition in markets where the United States and Canada compete. Target prices were reintroduced and the overall level of U.S. Government support was increased. Canadian farmers will find it more difficult to compete in grains, oilseeds, and pulses. Government support in Canada for these crops is significantly below U.S. support. Canada and the United States have a significant two-way trade in agricultural products, including beef and pork. The outbreak of Mad Cow Disease in Canada in 2003 clearly illustrates the need for cooperation between the two countries.

Details

North American Economic and Financial Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-094-4

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Susan Albers Mohrman and Stu Winby

We argue that in order to address the contemporary challenges that organizations and societies are facing, the field of organization development (OD) requires frameworks…

Abstract

We argue that in order to address the contemporary challenges that organizations and societies are facing, the field of organization development (OD) requires frameworks and skills to focus on the eco-system as the level of analysis. In a world that has become economically, socially, and technologically highly connected, approaches that foster the optimization of specific actors in the eco-system, such as individual corporations, result in sub-optimization of the sustainability of the natural and social system because there is insufficient offset to the ego-centric purposes of the focal organization. We discuss the need for OD to broaden focus to deal with technological advances that enable new ways of organizing at the eco-system level, and to deal with the challenges to sustainable development. Case examples from healthcare and the agri-foods industry illustrate the kinds of development approaches that are required for the development of healthy eco-systems. We do not suggest fundamental changes in the identity of the field of organizational development. In fact, we demonstrate the need to dig deeply into the open systems and socio-technical roots of the field, and to translate the traditional values and approaches of OD to continue to be relevant in today’s dynamic interdependent world.

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 2016

Raffaella Cagliano, Christopher G. Worley and Federico F. A. Caniato

This chapter introduces the volume’s theme by describing the challenges of sustainability in the agri-food industry and the critical role of agri-food supply chains…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter introduces the volume’s theme by describing the challenges of sustainability in the agri-food industry and the critical role of agri-food supply chains. Following a description of traditional and sustainable supply chain management practices, we discuss the likely characteristics of sustainability-oriented innovations and how organizations pursuing higher levels of economic, social, and environmental performance will need to adapt their capabilities.

Methodology/approach

Drawing on the emerging concepts and practices from sustainable supply chain management as well as traditional and emerging concepts from innovation, we develop general propositions and expectations about how organizations might address sustainable effectiveness in their supply chains. The importance of the agri-food industry to all three pillars of sustainable effectiveness and predictions about the inability to feed future populations gives the discussion a certain urgency.

Findings

Sustainability-oriented innovations in the agri-food supply chain are different from traditional innovations. We develop propositions regarding the driving motivations, their nature and scope (i.e., more radical and systemic than incremental and focused), and the importance of a multi-stakeholder approach. The 10 cases presented in the volume are summarized.

Details

Organizing Supply Chain Processes for Sustainable Innovation in the Agri-Food Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-488-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Gustavo Magalhães de Oliveira, Gaetano Martino, Stefano Ciliberti, Angelo Frascarelli and Gabriele Chiodini

This study aims to investigate farmer preferences regarding sales contracts for durum wheat in Italy.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate farmer preferences regarding sales contracts for durum wheat in Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider that contracts are formed by an organisational entity that is in charge of transferring decision and property rights based on reductions in transaction costs. The empirical analysis presents a discrete choice experiment with three distinct models that was performed by a survey of 160 wheat farmers in southern Italy.

Findings

The results show that contractual terms affect the probability of both a contract being signed and allocating decision rights due to their effects on price, technology and quality.

Practical implications

This study provides some insights on which contractual attributes could support the wider use of contracts along the durum wheat supply chain in Italy.

Originality/value

The paper reveals that contracts are relevant not only to the coordination of agri-food chains because of price stabilisation but also due to their impacts on technology and quality strategies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Vangelis Tzouvelekas, Christos J. Pantzios and Christos Fotopoulos

Estimates the output‐oriented and input‐specific technical efficiency in two samples of Greek, durum wheat farms – organic and conventional ones – using Kalirajan and…

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Abstract

Estimates the output‐oriented and input‐specific technical efficiency in two samples of Greek, durum wheat farms – organic and conventional ones – using Kalirajan and Obwona’s stochastic varying coefficient regression model. Findings indicate that the organic wheat farms examined are relatively more efficient. Reasons may include lower profit margins and restrictions on inputs permitted, which may force organic farmers to be more cautious with input use. However, technical efficiency scores are still relatively low for both types of wheat farming. Therefore, considerable scope for cost reducing and farm income improvement may exist in both farming modes. This realization could prove crucial for the long‐run viability and the future course of organic wheat farming.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Olufunmilola Olaitan Oladunmoye, Ogugua Charles Aworh, Beatrice Ade-Omowaye and Gloria Elemo

This paper aims to examine the effects of substituting durum wheat semolina (DWS) with high-quality cassava starch (HQCS) in macaroni noodle production.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of substituting durum wheat semolina (DWS) with high-quality cassava starch (HQCS) in macaroni noodle production.

Design/methodology/approach

The effect of substituting semolina with cassava starch in macaroni production at six levels, namely, 0, 20, 30, 50, 70, 100 per cent, and variation in hydration levels of 45, 50 and 55 per cent and their interaction were studied.

Findings

As substitution of DWS with HQCS increased from 0 to 50 per cent at 45 per cent hydration, amylose content increased from 15.91 to 22.79 per cent. However, beyond 50 per cent substitution level, the amylose content dropped significantly to 20.10 per cent. Yet, this reduction did not affect the extrusion ability of the doughs. Analysis of variance revealed that changes observed in the dough properties were not significant (p > 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

Trial productions of cassava macaroni noodles under factory processing conditions need to be explored. Also, cooking trials and consumer acceptability studies need to be conducted to pave the way for adoption by manufacturers.

Practical implications

Dried noodle products enjoy widespread popularity because of their shelf life, lower glycaemic indices, simplicity of preparation and moderate costs. This study showed the potential of substituting DWS with HQCS with no adverse effect on the dough and macaroni noodle characteristics.

Social implications

The adoption of the process described in this study would result in increased utilization of cassava, broaden existing food base and provide household food security for both rural and urban population.

Originality/value

This paper has shown the suitability of substituting DWS obtained from imported durum wheat, with HQCS: indigenous to Africa, for the economic benefit of macaroni manufacturers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

J. David Schofield

The prominence of wheat as the world's largest crop (in 1981 world production was almost 1.7 thousand million tonnes, of which about 40% went directly to human food use…

Abstract

The prominence of wheat as the world's largest crop (in 1981 world production was almost 1.7 thousand million tonnes, of which about 40% went directly to human food use) owes much to its almost unique ability to be baked into bread. This ability is largely attributable to the physico‐chemical properties of wheat proteins, which enable a leavened dough to rise by trapping the carbon dioxide, produced during yeast fermentation, as discrete, small gas cells — a structure that is ‘set’ during baking. Another important type of food made from wheat is pasta and the suitability of wheat for this end use is also governed by the properties of wheat proteins. The suitability of wheats for other uses, such as cracker, biscuit and cake manufacture and domestic flour is also affected by these proteins.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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