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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Tricia Vilkinas, Duncan William Murray and Sarah Mei Yi Chua

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model of effective managerial leadership that incorporates the motivation of leaders to lead, their leadership behaviours and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model of effective managerial leadership that incorporates the motivation of leaders to lead, their leadership behaviours and their reflective and learning ability (integrator). This model seeks to provide a more complete picture on the factors that contribute to effective leadership. Drawing on Quinn’s (1984) competing values framework and Vilkinas and Cartan’s (2001) integrated competing values framework, this study addresses the question of what motivates leaders to engage in effective leadership behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study examines the effects of motivation to lead (MTL), the integrator and behavioural repertoire on leadership effectiveness of 439 managers. Data were gathered in an online questionnaire using the online survey tool “Survey Monkey”.

Findings

Results show that the integrator (Vilkinas and Cartan, 2001) and the behavioural repertoire (Hooijberg, 1996) are significant predictors of leadership effectiveness. Affective identity and social-normative motivations to lead are strong predictors of leadership effectiveness, while non-calculative is a weaker predictor.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the use of self-perceptions. Future research could broaden the current results by including perceptions of work colleagues.

Practical implications

The results have implications for human resource managers as regards selecting and developing leaders.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the ways in which the integrator, behavioural repertoire and MTL predict leadership effectiveness.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Boo Ho Voon, Nagarajah Lee and Duncan Murray

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the proposed measure of sports service quality (SSQ) and examine the relationships between emotional experience (EE) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the proposed measure of sports service quality (SSQ) and examine the relationships between emotional experience (EE) and user satisfaction (US) for sports competitions/training venues (i.e. for the sport of badminton).

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group discussions and related literature review were used to generate items for the SSQ. Structured questionnaires captured the perceptions of 240 users of sports venues in Malaysia. The relationships between SSQ, EE and US were assessed via structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Results show that the SSQ has five dimensions (peripheral, reliability, responsiveness, core and value). Core, peripheral and value have positive effects on users’ EE whereas peripheral, reliability, responsiveness and core have positive effects on US. The SEM analysis suggests that EE mediates the relationship between SSQ and US.

Research limitations/implications

The SSQ scale is developed using data from the badminton sport industry and is yet to be validated in other types of sports venues. In addition, measures of customer loyalty also need to be considered.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that provision of quality service directly influences satisfaction with sports venues and enhances the EE of customers. Sports venue managers should monitor the service management, particularly in terms of the physical environment and personnel.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a specific measure of service quality tailored for use in sports venues. It also provides further support for the mediating role EE plays in the service quality-satisfaction relationship.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Abstract

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Auto Motives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85-724234-1

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Sarah Mei Yi Chua and Duncan William Murray

The purpose of this paper is to study gender-based differences in information-processing impact on message perception, leading to women viewing the behavior of potentially…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study gender-based differences in information-processing impact on message perception, leading to women viewing the behavior of potentially toxic leaders more negatively than they are viewed by men.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 381 participants completed a series of measures of cue recognition items, collusion and conformity pertaining to a hypothetical toxic leadership scenario.

Findings

Results indicated that women perceived the toxic leader more negatively than men, elaborating more on negative message connotations, while men emphasized positives. Likewise, men recorded higher scores on their tendency to collude with the toxic leader compared to women. Evidence was also found that participants were more attuned to negative messages and behavior from a leader of the same gender.

Research limitations/implications

The Anglo-Celtic dominance of the sample is identified as a potential limitation. Further research exploring how not only gender, but age and cultural differences impact on how leaders are perceived is also proposed.

Practical implications

From a management standpoint understanding that men and women process information differently has worth in assisting in organizations more effectively structuring their intra-organizational communications. Gender-specific communications may help to offset perceptions of negativity toward leaders.

Originality/value

This study is the first to consider how gender-based information-processing differences may influence whether a leader is perceived as toxic by male and female followers. It also suggests that gender interaction effects may be critical when considering how leaders, particularly toxic leaders, are viewed by employees.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Sarah Kovoor-Misra, Shanthi Gopalakrishnan and Haisu Zhang

Organizational identification could play an important role during crises if it contributes to individuals' perceptions of control. This study examines this relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational identification could play an important role during crises if it contributes to individuals' perceptions of control. This study examines this relationship and unpacks some of its complexities by investigating the mediating role of job satisfaction and citizenship behaviors that have previously been examined as outcomes of organizational identification in noncrisis contexts. The authors also investigate the moderating role of the perceived severity of the crisis on the relationships between organizational identification and job satisfaction and citizenship behaviors. There is limited empirical research on these relationships in a crisis context, and studying them is important for understanding the role of identification in diverse contexts and for crisis management research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the survey method, quantitative data were collected from 354 individuals from a nonprofit organization that filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. This was supplemented with qualitative data from respondents' comments in the survey.

Findings

Using process analysis, the authors find the following: (1) job satisfaction fully mediates the relationship between organizational identification and perceived control; (2) the perceived severity of the crisis moderates the relationship between organizational identification and job satisfaction; (3) citizenship behavior is associated with organizational identification but is not a significant mediator in the relationship between organizational identification and perceived control and (4) the perceived severity of the crisis is not a significant moderator of the relationship between organizational identification and citizenship behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s model can be further tested in public and private organizations that are experiencing bankruptcies to examine the robustness of our findings. Also, due to the cross-sectional design of this study, the findings need to be tested in a longitudinal study to examine if they persist over time during the recovery and growth phases of a crisis.

Practical implications

Leaders can rely on individuals who identify with their organizations during a crisis, such as bankruptcies because they experience job satisfaction and a sense of control. Additionally, these individuals also demonstrate citizenship behaviors in these challenging situations.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to empirically examine the association between organizational identification and perceived control, the mediating role of job satisfaction and citizenship behaviors and the moderating role of perceived severity in the context of an organizational crisis. An additional strength of this study is that it provides empirical evidence from individuals in an actual crisis rather than from laboratory studies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Li Hui, Wang Qun, Sajjad Nazir, Zhao Mengyu, Muhammad Ali Asadullah and Sahar Khadim

Millennial-generation employees need to stimulate their creativity to produce innovative ideas, services and products for organizations to flourish and succeed. The main…

Abstract

Purpose

Millennial-generation employees need to stimulate their creativity to produce innovative ideas, services and products for organizations to flourish and succeed. The main purpose of this research was to discover the mechanism through which organization identification influences employees' creativity in the Chinese organizational context. Particularly, we proposed the mediating role of work engagement and the moderating role of work values in the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was utilized to collect the data from 281 employees working in China. Hierarchical regression was utilized to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings reveal that organizational identification significantly influences the creativity of millennial employees; work engagement plays a positive mediating role between organizational identification and employee creativity. Moreover, work values of millennial generation employees, specifically utilitarian orientation, intrinsic preferences, interpersonal harmony and innovation orientation have a positive moderating effect between work engagement and employee creativity.

Originality/value

This study recognizes and analyzes the mechanism underlying the influence of organizational identification and recommends that work engagement is a crucial mediator of the complicated relationship between organizational identification and employee creativity. Consequently, this study is the key effort for millennial employees’ work values and engagement to explore employee creativity in Chinese cultural context and also suggests important theoretical and practical implications.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Carla Mascarenhas, Luis Mendes, Carla Marques and Anderson Galvão

Despite the recognised importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in higher education institutions (HEIs), research concerning CSR’s influence on employees…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the recognised importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in higher education institutions (HEIs), research concerning CSR’s influence on employees’ attitudes and behaviours is still understudied. Grounded in the theory of social identity, this study aims to explore CSR’s impact on employees’ work engagement, job satisfaction and organisational identification in an HEI context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in a northern Portugal public HEI through a self-administered questionnaire distributed to both teaching and supporting staff. A structural equation modelling (SEM) approach was applied to data collected from 171 employees, using the partial least squares-SEM approach.

Findings

Overall, the findings show that CSR is strongly associated with work engagement, job satisfaction, identification with the organisation and perceived organisational support, confirming the hypothesised influence of HEI’s CSR development efforts on study-related attitudes.

Practical implications

Findings reinforce the need for HEIs to integrate CSR and human resource strategies and to pay special attention to CSR communication strategies.

Social implications

Findings reinforce the need for HEI to develop adequate CSR strategies because these have a significant influence on employees’ satisfaction at work, and thus on employees’ well-being in general.

Originality/value

This study contributes to attenuate the lack of literature on CSR’s impacts on employee behaviours.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Won-Moo Hur, Yuhyung Shin, Seung-Yoon Rhee and Hyosun Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of organizational virtuousness and task crafting, and to test the mediating roles…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of organizational virtuousness and task crafting, and to test the mediating roles of organizational identification and work engagement in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected questionnaires from 175 Korean flight attendants and conducted structural equation modeling analyses.

Findings

Employees’ perceptions of organizational virtuousness were positively associated with task crafting. While organizational identification was not solely responsible for mediating this relationship, it intervened in the relationship between organizational virtuousness perceptions and task crafting by affecting work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

While this study provides important insights into the roles of organizational virtuousness, organizational identification, and work engagement in promoting task crafting, the use of self-reported, cross-sectional data limits causal inferences between variables.

Practical implications

Based on the present findings, managers can better understand the antecedents and mediating processes affecting employees’ task crafting.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the positive organizational psychology literature by revealing crucial intermediary processes linking organizational virtuousness perceptions and task crafting, thus suggesting reciprocity and social identity-based motivation as potential underlying mechanisms of task crafting.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2019

Emre Burak Ekmekcioglu and Enver Aydogan

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating role of organizational identification (OI) on the relationship between organizational justice (OJ) and turnover…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating role of organizational identification (OI) on the relationship between organizational justice (OJ) and turnover intention (TI), as well as the moderating role of psychological contract fulfillment (PCF) in those relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 339 employees of a financial institution in Turkey. Regression analyses were conducted to investigate a moderated mediation model.

Findings

This study found that OI was partially mediated the relationship between OJ and TI. The results also indicated that the indirect effect of OJ on TI through OI was moderated by PCF.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the findings is limited. As this study is cross-sectional, causal inferences cannot be inferred regarding the hypothesized relationships.

Practical implications

To reduce TI, organizations should ensure the fair allocation of resources and rewards among employees. Moreover, organizations should pay attention to the expectations of employees and the promises made to them in an attempt to fulfill psychological contract obligations.

Originality/value

This study explores the mediating role of OI in the relationship between OJ and TI. In addition, this research sheds light on the moderating role of PCF in this mediation model.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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