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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Du Sig Choi, Paul Michell and Dayananda Palihawadana

This paper aims to discuss the profiles of Korean chaebols involved in global electronics

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the profiles of Korean chaebols involved in global electronics

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted among 132 of their Korean suppliers, with linked in‐depth interviews with chaebol managers. From an initial set of literature‐based variables, factor analysis is used to generate six chaebol characteristics, which are then correlated with four chaebol‐supplier relationship outcomes.

Findings

“Decision making” and “social exchange”, in particular, are found to correlate positively with all four chaebol‐supplier relationship outcome measures, relationship satisfaction, performance, cooperation and conflict resolution. “Partnership” is associated positively with three of these outcomes, and “strategy‐longevity” with relationship satisfaction. The chaebols' “structure‐control” and “leadership” are not found to be predictors of successful relationship outcomes as measured in this study. A combination of higher quality, lower cost products with linkages to a foundation of decision making, social exchange, partnership and strategy‐longevity appears to be a potent mix for global players.

Originality/value

The paper provides the underpinnings of the marketing strategy and component strategy profiles of a number of major Korean multinationals in the belief that they would inform western relationship marketing strategies.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Atul K. Saxena and Vijaya Subrahmanyam

Reviews the literature on economies of scale and scope in savings and loan institutions and uses 1980‐1987 US data to explore the cost effects of simultaneous production…

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1372

Abstract

Reviews the literature on economies of scale and scope in savings and loan institutions and uses 1980‐1987 US data to explore the cost effects of simultaneous production of outputs (mortgage loans, other loans and deposits), the impact of size and product‐specific economies of scale. Includes interest as a non‐operating cost and divides the sample into four groups based on asset values. Shows that total costs rose faster than assets, deposits or loans over the period; that there are product‐specific diseconomies of scale for deposits and loans‐ and that economies of scope were made by the larger firms following deregulation.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Andreas C. Christofi

Refers to previous research on the yields of default‐free securities and uses the Nelson‐Siegel model for estimating yield curve as a basis for developing a model which…

Abstract

Refers to previous research on the yields of default‐free securities and uses the Nelson‐Siegel model for estimating yield curve as a basis for developing a model which decomposes the risk premium into long‐term risk, two factors influencing the rate of decay (curvature) and a feed back factor. Applies this to 1984‐1993 data for treasury bills to test for predictive validity and shows that the feedback factor (prediction error of the most recent period) improves this by around 10 per cent. Goes on to apply a multivariate exponential GARCH process to the components to produce a prediction model for the term structure of interest rates. Promises further research to refine this estimation and compare it with the expectations hypothesis as a basis for strategy.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 24 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2015

Tanja Mihalič, Janne J. Liburd and Jaume Guia

This chapter analyzes the importance and performance of values in tourism higher education and business as seen by the alumni of the European Master in Tourism Management…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the importance and performance of values in tourism higher education and business as seen by the alumni of the European Master in Tourism Management. The students were exposed to the values-based education framework proposed by the Tourism Educational Future Initiative. This chapter empirically tests the relevance of its model for an ideal and real industry, and for the corresponding world of tourism education. Using importance performance analysis, results identify gaps between the importance and performance in the values. The findings have implications for the future development and implementation of experimental values-based education.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Ajai Prakash and Jagongo Ambrose Ouma

Many Asians migrated to Kenya in the late 19th century. Some of these Asians have been running successful entrepreneurship ventures, some of which are over a century old…

Abstract

Many Asians migrated to Kenya in the late 19th century. Some of these Asians have been running successful entrepreneurship ventures, some of which are over a century old. The study investigated whether there are any differences in the approach to entrepreneurship between the businessmen of Asian origin and those of African origin. A questionnaire was administered to 80 entrepreneurs of Asian origin and 75 of African origin doing businesses in two major Kenyan cities, Nairobi and Kisumu. The Asian origin entrepreneurs were more into manufacturing businesses, more exposed to challenges, and had global education and a higher element of being next generation entrepreneurs than those of African origin. African origin Entrepreneurs were more likely to initiate businesses on their own, enjoyed community support and enrolled for more technical training, but were more risk averse. This article revolves around the theme of how socioeconomic evolution affects the way businesses are conducted.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Anita Kit‐wa Chan

This paper, based on forty in‐depth interviews with teachers and principals in Hong Kong, utilizes the insights of feminist organization studies to explore the persistence…

Abstract

This paper, based on forty in‐depth interviews with teachers and principals in Hong Kong, utilizes the insights of feminist organization studies to explore the persistence of gender inequalities in primary school teaching. Two common practices, namely the assignment of women and men to teach lower and higher grades respectively and the monopoly of men in positions of disciplining and authority, are centered. The data suggest that schools and teachers actively construct and reproduce gender inequalities by trivializing teaching of young children as babysitting, naturalizing women as natural caregivers, and normalizing the use of threat in disciplinary control. My analysis also argues that these routine and pervasive gendering processes are not often acknowledged or challenged, which have the effects of marginalizing caring work, overlooking the emotional labor of women, valorizing a masculine view of authority, encouraging men and boys to compete for power via aggression, and hence producing a masculinist workplace.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Ke Ma and Xin Zhong

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of perceived justice and consumer's moral judgment of a service failure on recovery outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of perceived justice and consumer's moral judgment of a service failure on recovery outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model is examined by adopting a field study approach followed by an experiment. The SPSS program with the PROCESS tool was used to analyze the simple moderation and moderated mediation effects.

Findings

The research findings show that consumer's moral judgment of a service failure moderates the relationship between service recovery (psychological compensation vs monetary compensation) and recovery outcomes (recovery satisfaction, negative word of mouth and repurchase intention). Moreover, the conditional indirect effect of service recovery on recovery outcomes through perceived justice is significant when service failure is seen as less moral. Specifically, consumers report lower perceived justice and react negatively to recovery measures when service failure is seen as less moral. In contrast, when consumers perceive a service failure as moral, a psychological compensation outperforms a monetary compensation, lessening negative word of mouth (NWOM).

Originality/value

These findings provide important insights into recovery measure development when considering consumer moral perspectives.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Gregg A. Stevens, Martin Morris, Tony Nguyen and Emily Vardell

Health science librarians occupy a unique place in librarianship, guiding healthcare professionals and the public to quality sources of medical research and consumer…

Abstract

Health science librarians occupy a unique place in librarianship, guiding healthcare professionals and the public to quality sources of medical research and consumer health information in order to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. A broader impact of health sciences librarianship is its advocacy for improvements in public health. In recent years, health science librarians have been actively involved in advocating for adequate, responsive, and culturally competent health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals. Health sciences librarians have advocated for LGBTQ+ individuals through a variety of specialized outreach projects to address health disparities found in the LGBTQ+ community such as HIV/AIDS, women’s health, or substance abuse, have collaborated with public health agencies and community-based organizations to identify health disparities and needs, and have implemented outreach to address these needs.

This chapter maps the landscape of health sciences librarian outreach to LGBTQ+ people. The authors develop this theme through case studies of health science librarians providing health information to the LGBTQ+ community and healthcare professionals. Following an overview of advocacy for LGBTQ+ health by the US National Network of Libraries of Medicine and professional information organizations, they conclude the chapter by discussing the “pioneering” nature of these projects and the common threads uniting them, and by identifying the next steps for continued successful outreach through the development of an evidence base and tailoring of outreach and resources to address other demographic aspects of the members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Details

LGBTQ+ Librarianship in the 21st Century: Emerging Directions of Advocacy and Community Engagement in Diverse Information Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-474-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Sadrudin A. Ahmed, Alain d’Astous and Christian Champagne

This article presents the results of a survey of 202 male Taiwanese consumers. In this study, consumer judgements of two technological products varying in their level of…

Abstract

This article presents the results of a survey of 202 male Taiwanese consumers. In this study, consumer judgements of two technological products varying in their level of complexity made in highly, moderately, and newly industrialised countries were obtained in a multi‐attribute context. The results show that the country‐of‐origin image of moderately and newly industrialised countries was less negative for technologically simpler products (i.e. a television) than they were for technologically complex products (i.e. a computer). It appears that the negative image of moderately and newly industrialised countries can be attenuated by making Taiwanese consumers more familiar with products made in these countries and/or by providing them with other product‐related information such as brand name and warranty. Newly industrialised countries were perceived more negatively as countries of design than as countries of assembly, especially in the context of making technologically complex products. The image of foreign countries as producers of consumer goods was positively correlated with education. The more familiar consumers were with the products of a country, the more favourable was their evaluation of that country. Consumer involvement with purchasing a technologically complex product such as a computer was positively associated with the appreciation of products made in moderately industrialised countries. Managerial and research implications are derived from these results.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Peter Björk and Hannele Kauppinen-Räisänen

To provide insights into holiday well-being, the purpose of this paper is to examine two inevitable traveller activities related to destinations’ gastronomy: pre-trip food…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide insights into holiday well-being, the purpose of this paper is to examine two inevitable traveller activities related to destinations’ gastronomy: pre-trip food information sourcing and the daily meals consumed.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out among 243 Finnish travellers. The findings are based on univariate analysis (t-test, ANOVA and regression analysis).

Findings

Pre-trip behaviour to ensure holiday well-being is based on travellers’ interests in food, an emotional desire for a sense of safety and a functional desire for convenience, while they collect information from the internet and guidebooks about recommended food places and local food as well as food safety and price level. Travellers’ place the highest importance on dinner for their holiday well-being, especially foodies – those travellers with a keen interest in food. Breakfast is the second most important meal contributing to holiday well-being.

Practical implications

These findings inform destination marketing organisations about what food dimensions they should emphasise in destination gastronomy-related marketing communication for tour operators and hotel and local restaurants about the essence of dinner and breakfast for holiday well-being.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into the role of destinations’ gastronomy in holiday well-being, which deserves to be studied in the current era of experiences and food interest.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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