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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Paul J. Morton, Kelsy Luengen and Lorraine Mazerolle

The purpose of this paper is to present evaluation results of Operation Galley, an intelligence-led policing (ILP) intervention that sought to proactively address the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present evaluation results of Operation Galley, an intelligence-led policing (ILP) intervention that sought to proactively address the problem of drug dealing from hotel rooms by engaging hoteliers as crime control partners with the Queensland Police Service.

Design/methodology/approach

Operation Galley, a randomized control field trial, rank ordered and matched 120 hotels on size, star rating, location and estimated degree of suspicious behaviour. Hotels were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: Operation Galley hotels who received a procedurally just letter, followed by a personal visit with detectives; the letter-only hotels who received the procedurally just letter; and the business as usual hotels.

Findings

Using repeated measures ANOVA and general linear models, results of the 12-month trial indicate that the Operation Galley condition led to an increase in police engagement with hoteliers, increasing the recognition, reporting and police enforcement of drug offenders.

Practical implications

The Operation Galley trial demonstrates that the ILP approach helped foster positive engagement between hoteliers and detectives. The approach cultivated hoteliers as crime control partners and thereby increased the flow of human source intelligence, helping police to better target and respond to drug dealing problems in hotel rooms.

Originality/value

Results of the Operation Galley trial demonstrate that hoteliers can be leveraged as crime control partners, providing important human source intelligence about drug dealing and facilitating the capacity of police to better respond to drug problems in hotels.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Yu Hsing

Examines the determinants of illegal drug arrests based on the 1991data for 48 states in the USA. Major findings indicate that illegal drugarrests have a positive relation…

Abstract

Examines the determinants of illegal drug arrests based on the 1991 data for 48 states in the USA. Major findings indicate that illegal drug arrests have a positive relation with welfare (AFDC) recipients, high school dropout rates, field police force and other types of crime, and a negative relation with the unemployment rate. Policy implications of this study are that to reduce illegal drug crime, the government and parents need to emphasize family values and work ethics, provide quality education and proper counselling, increase field police size or make police more productive, and reduce other types of crime.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Luiz de Andrade Filho

This essay aims to examine the relationship between socio‐economic forces and drug‐related organised crime in Brazil. It focuses on both judicial structures and social…

Abstract

Purpose

This essay aims to examine the relationship between socio‐economic forces and drug‐related organised crime in Brazil. It focuses on both judicial structures and social service delivery to illustrate how they impact the shaping of criminal networks – a recurrent situation in many Latin American countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from previous research on drug trafficking conducted for Amazonian states and the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, this paper takes the viewpoint put forward by key development literature along with well established works on crime and corruption in order to conclude on interactions of important political, social and economic factors with crime.

Findings

It finds that some transformations introduced during the 1980s are a crucial element to understand the building up of criminal organisations. Furthermore, the absence of an effective judicial system, the lack of social service delivery by the government and cultural factors are central elements to take into account when seeking to address drug‐related crime.

Practical implications

A balance between positive and negative measures to combat organised crime and a better understanding of the institutional environment should be sought while designing public policies to address crime in Brazil. Moreover, further research is needed in order to gather a greater amount of reliable data, as well as an accurate appraisal of different strategies to prevent organised crime to broaden its incidence in the country.

Originality/value

The paper is a good starting point for those aiming to comprehend how organised crime operates in Brazil (and possibly in some Latin American countries).

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Kim Sadique

Current criminological theory and the Government's focus on ‘community safety’ and ‘crime and disorder reduction’ has led to the creation of a new discipline, or at least…

Abstract

Current criminological theory and the Government's focus on ‘community safety’ and ‘crime and disorder reduction’ has led to the creation of a new discipline, or at least a new paradigm, that of crime science. This article explores the theoretical basis and multi‐disciplinary nature of crime science and its usefulness in the reduction of alcohol and drug‐related crime.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Robert S. Gossweiler and Steven S. Martin

This study examines the relationship of personality characteristics to drug treatment effectiveness for prison releasees. Prison releasees from two drug treatment programs…

Abstract

This study examines the relationship of personality characteristics to drug treatment effectiveness for prison releasees. Prison releasees from two drug treatment programs (an out‐patient setting and a therapeutic community setting) are compared with each other and to releasees from a comparison group. Treatment success is measured 6 months after release from prison in terms of 1) abstinence of illicit drug use and 2) lack of recidivism. The data are analyzed using logistic regression with demographic, criminal history, past drug use, psychological, and treatment measures included in the equations. Findings suggest that several personality dimensions are related to treatment effectiveness, sometimes in unexpected ways. The findings also reveal that different personality characteristics are associated with each of the two measures of treatment success. The results are discussed in terms of policy implications for treatment programs.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

H. Naci Mocan and Erdal Tekin

Using data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this chapter investigates the impact of individual drug use on robbery, burglary, theft, and…

Abstract

Using data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this chapter investigates the impact of individual drug use on robbery, burglary, theft, and damaging property for juveniles. Using a variety of fixed-effects models that exploit variations over time and between siblings and twins, the results indicate that drug use has a significant impact on the propensity to commit crime. We find that the median impact of cocaine use on the propensity to commit various types of crimes is 11 percentage points. The impact of using inhalants or other drugs is an increase in the propensity to commit crime by 7 percentage points, respectively.

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Rendi Prayuda, Tulus Warsito and Surwandono

The purpose of this paper is to study the factors that caused The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) security regime to be ineffective in saving transnational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the factors that caused The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) security regime to be ineffective in saving transnational drug smuggling, including the internalization of non-optimal values and norms of the ASEAN Drug-Free Declaration.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses primary data and secondary data. Data analysis and observation are carried out simultaneously, where data are analyzed directly after it is obtained using descriptive analysis. Interactive data analysis is carried out at the initial step by collecting primary and secondary data. Data are analyzed inductively by drawing conclusions from data obtained from general views to specifics.

Findings

The development of ASEAN has led to the idea of “ASEAN Way,” namely, the ASEAN security forum to eliminate the use of force in maintaining relations between member countries through the dissemination of agreed values. Multilateral negotiations refer to the establishment of a negotiation regime at the ASEAN level that emphasizes the interests of ASEAN member countries in determining agreements relating to transnational drug crimes. There are several inhibiting factors in the negotiation process, namely, perception differences between ASEAN countries on the threat of drug smuggling in the Southeast Asia region and the differences of ASEAN leaders’ priorities and agenda.

Originality/value

The originality/authenticity of research is analyzing the factors that affect the ASEAN security system in transnational protection policies by using two models, namely, the international level negotiation model and one at the national level in the form of ratification of ASEAN international relations related to drug smuggling. At present, transnational crimes, especially drug smuggling, appear and pose a threat to national and international security. The object of this research is ASEAN international organizations in cases of transnational drug smuggling.

Details

foresight, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Lorraine Green Mazerolle and William Terrill

Describes a problem‐oriented policing program in Jersey City that seeks to identify, analyze, and target drug, disorder, and violent crime problems in public housing…

Abstract

Describes a problem‐oriented policing program in Jersey City that seeks to identify, analyze, and target drug, disorder, and violent crime problems in public housing. Describes the problem scanning and identification processes that were used to detect hot spot locations within six public housing sites in the study. Begins the research with a premise that public housing sites differ from one site to the next and that, even within some public housing sites, some common area places will have problems, while others will not. Research findings support this premise. Concludes that there is a distribution of crime problems both across and within public housing sites challenging the hot spot label universalistically applied to public housing sites. The problem identification process has implications for the way problem‐solving teams approach policing public housing sites.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Simon Mackenzie and Niall Hamilton‐Smith

This paper aims to analyse and critique common performance indicators for the policing of organised crime, and to propose a new approach.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse and critique common performance indicators for the policing of organised crime, and to propose a new approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was based on key respondent interviews with staff at an organised crime‐policing agency; literature review; analytical work and construction of a new model.

Findings

KPIs and other targets drive the policing of organised crime. Often these ultimately constitute numerical targets – amount of drugs seized; number of key nominals arrested, etc. – which are crude and which the research evidence base on the reduction or prevention of organised crime activity does not support as being suitable measures of success. Success in contemporary organised crime policing is increasingly becoming defined in terms of “harm reduction” (often at the “community level”). A new performance management framework for organised crime‐policing agencies is proposed, which is more sensitive than traditional measures to harm reduction. The proposed model comprises three components: programme logic; a pathway approach; and the use of evaluation panels.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical research was only conducted in one organised crime agency and therefore provides a case study approach to performance management. The literature review suggests that the performance management framework of that agency was similar to other comparable agencies around the world, but more comparative research would be needed to confirm that. The model proposed would benefit from piloting and evaluation.

Practical implications

The analysis and modelling provided in this paper create the groundwork for the development of more effective performance indicators and targets in organised crime policing.

Originality/value

This lies in the attempt to tie business model drivers into policing that is more sensitive to reducing the adverse social outcomes of organised crime than traditional drivers that tend to create formal, rather than substantive, police interventions.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Saša Djordjević and Bojan Dobovšek

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) into crime-fighting and present new criminal landscapes in the Western…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) into crime-fighting and present new criminal landscapes in the Western Balkans Six (WB6) (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, North Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia) at the beginning of the pandemic crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on the content analysis of legal acts, strategic documents, academic articles, media reporting, official documents, four semi-structured interviews with civil society organisations, two consultations with police officers and two consultations with civil society organisations.

Findings

In the first nine weeks of the spread of COVID-19, the WB6 experienced a small rise in the price of marijuana. The same applied to stimulant drugs like ecstasy and amphetamines. However, very little heroin was available. Prices of protective face masks, disinfectants and medicinal alcohol skyrocketed due to attempts at price gouging. There were cases of scams using mobile and digital technologies, as well as burglaries of newspaper or cigarette kiosks, shops, pharmacies and exchange offices. It was difficult to determine whether the smuggling of and trafficking in human beings experienced a decline or increase. No cases of sexual exploitation for providing online services were noted, although the number of calls made to organisations that assist in the area of human trafficking increased. People with drug and alcohol problems, persons living with HIV, those susceptible to stress, citizens with mental health problems, pensioners, the poor, the homeless and recently released prisoners were the biggest potential victims of crime at the onset of the crisis brought by the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings are limited to specific forms of crime (illicit drug trade, economic crime, fraud, scams, theft, smuggling of and trafficking in human beings) in the WB6 and based on findings from four interviews and four consultations, together with available secondary data.

Originality/value

This is the first overview of criminal activities occurring in the WB6 during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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