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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Alberto Mortaro, Diana Pascu, Serena Pancheri, Mariangela Mazzi, Stefano Tardivo, Claudio Bellamoli, Federica Ferrarese, Albino Poli, Gabriele Romano and Francesca Moretti

According to literature, interruptions during drug administration lead to a significant proportion of medication errors. Evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to…

1770

Abstract

Purpose

According to literature, interruptions during drug administration lead to a significant proportion of medication errors. Evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to reduce interruption is still limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore main reasons for interruptions during drug administration rounds in a geriatric ward of an Italian secondary hospital and test the effectiveness of a combined intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a pre and post-intervention observational study based on direct observation. All nurse staff (24) participated to the study that lead to observe a total of 44 drug dispensing rounds with 945 drugs administered to 491 patients in T0 and 994 drugs to 506 patients in T1.

Findings

A significant reduction of raw number of interruptions (mean per round from 17.31 in T0 to 9.09 in T1, p<0.01), interruptions/patient rate (from 0.78 in T0 to 0.40 in T1, p<0.01) and interruptions/drugs rate (from 0.44 in T0 to 0.22 in T1, p<0.01) were observed. Needs for further improvements were elicited (e.g. a greater involvement of support staff).

Practical implications

Nurse staff should be adequately trained on the risks related to interruptions during drug administration since routine activity is at high risk of distractions due to its repetitive and skill-based nature.

Originality/value

A strong involvement of both MB and leadership, together with the frontline staff, helped to raise staff motivation and guide a bottom-up approach, able to identify tailored interventions and serve concurrently as training instrument tool.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1976

Roberta A. Scull

This compilation of over 500 United States Government bibliographies is the second annual supplement to BIBLIOGRAPHY OF UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT BIBLIOGRAPHIES 1968–1973…

Abstract

This compilation of over 500 United States Government bibliographies is the second annual supplement to BIBLIOGRAPHY OF UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT BIBLIOGRAPHIES 1968–1973 (Pierian Press). Due to the Government Printing Office backlog during 1974, many 1973 and 1974 titles are included in this 1975 Supplement, which should have appeared earlier.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Abstract

Details

Intelligence and State Surveillance in Modern Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-171-1

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Roberta Pinna, Pier Paolo Carrus and Fabiana Marras

The purpose of this paper is to present the latest innovations in the drug distribution processes of hospital companies, which are currently dealing with high inventory…

1588

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the latest innovations in the drug distribution processes of hospital companies, which are currently dealing with high inventory and storage costs and fragmented organizational responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review and the in-depth analysis of a case study support the understanding of the unit dose drug distribution system and the subsequent definition of the practical implications for hospital companies.

Findings

Starting from the insights offered by the case study, the analysis shows that the unit dose system allows hospitals to improve the patient care quality and reduce costs.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the research are those related to the theoretical and exploratory nature of the study, but from a practical point of view, the work provides important indications to the management of healthcare companies, which have to innovate their drug distribution systems.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes a new and highly topical issue and provides several insights for the competitive development of a fundamental sector.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Ana Belén Jiménez Muñoz, Antonio Muiño Miguez, María Paz Rodriguez Pérez, María Dolores Vigil Escribano, María Esther Durán Garcia and María Sanjurjo Saez

Healthcare risk epidemiology identifies medication error as the commonest cause of adverse effects on patients. Medication error can occur at any phase of the complex…

3096

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare risk epidemiology identifies medication error as the commonest cause of adverse effects on patients. Medication error can occur at any phase of the complex medication process so prevalence rates need to be estimated at each drug treatment phase: prescription, transcription and administration along with their clinical repercussions. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Medication errors were recorded on an ad hoc sheet and staff were observed handling medications. Recorded errors were later classified and their clinical repercussions determined by experts.

Findings

In total 757 inpatients and 5,466 drug prescriptions were studied. The prescription error rate was 4.79 percent (95 percent CI 4.21‐5.36). The most frequent error in this phase was failing to observe international prescribing standards. The highest error rate was found in transcription (14.61 percent, 95 percent CI 13.67‐15.54). Almost 1,900 dose administrations were observed. There was a 9.32 percent error rate (95 percent CI 7.98‐10.67). The commonest error in this phase was omission. Most were transcription errors, which were detected before harm was done.

Research limitations/implications

The dispensation phase is absent.

Practical implications

Errors can be reduced if they are understood. Education and training based on the study's findings can reduce medication errors.

Originality/value

The paper highlights ways to reduce errors in the medication process.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Matthew E. Sarkees and M. Paula Fitzgerald

Off-label drug prescribing by healthcare providers is a growing practice. Yet, the US Food and Drug Administration bans the marketing of drugs for off-label uses. In…

Abstract

Purpose

Off-label drug prescribing by healthcare providers is a growing practice. Yet, the US Food and Drug Administration bans the marketing of drugs for off-label uses. In recent years, legal challenges by the pharmaceutical industry have chipped away government restrictions on off-label drug promotion. Although the changing legal landscape has been discussed, this paper aims to examine how key stakeholders and policy-makers might interact to provide a more transparent marketing environment for off-label drug discussions in the patient–provider relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a variety of sources, the authors assess the current marketing landscape of off-label drugs and some of the issues that challenge the healthcare provider–patient relationship. The authors then examine opportunities to improve the off-label promotion environment and the relevant decision-making theories that key stakeholders need to consider when formulating marketing efforts and policies.

Findings

The authors suggest that fewer restrictions on truthful, non-misleading off-label drug promotion provide an opportunity to improve drug knowledge and, importantly, healthcare provider and consumer decision-making. Key stakeholders should consider, among other solutions, criteria for defining truthful information on off-label drugs, alternative methods of approval of off-label uses and ubiquitous icons to identify off-label prescribing to all stakeholders.

Originality/value

Rather than rehash the legal landscape of off-label drug promotion, this paper focuses on how the healthcare provider–patient relationship is impacted and how stakeholders can improve information flow in this changing environment.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Jill Gladstone and Sue Sutherland

Recent developments in medical treatments have resulted in the increased use of infusion devices for the administration of highly potent drugs. Drug administration is one…

Abstract

Recent developments in medical treatments have resulted in the increased use of infusion devices for the administration of highly potent drugs. Drug administration is one of the highest risk areas of clinical practice and infusion devices are associated with a substantial number of adverse drug events. Locally, there was a perception that adverse drug events involving infusion devices appeared to be increasing, and there was anecdotal evidence to suggest that the available number of devices was inadequate to meet the increasing demand. A two‐part, observational audit, carried out in an acute district general hospital, was used to identify weak areas in the systems associated with the use of infusion devices and to implement actions to rectify the weaknesses and consequently reduce the risk to patients and staff.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Robert I. Field

Newly marketed drugs present unavoidable risks, no matter how diligent the level of pre-market review. Numerous adverse drug events attest to the need for post-market…

Abstract

Newly marketed drugs present unavoidable risks, no matter how diligent the level of pre-market review. Numerous adverse drug events attest to the need for post-market vigilance. However, the Food and Drug Administration monitors drugs with considerably less rigor after launch than before. This burdens both public health and public trust in the safety of new medicines. As new technologies such as genomics guide a larger share of drug development, the issue will become more acute. Most reform proposals present considerable logistical challenges. A promising alternative is to harness existing managed care databases to search for drug effects.

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

1 – 10 of over 12000