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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Stephen A. LeMay, Larry Johnson, Zachary Williams and Michael Garver

Driver turnover has plagued the truckload industry in the USA since deregulation in 1980. Turnover in truck load firms averages above 100 percent in good economic times…

Abstract

Purpose

Driver turnover has plagued the truckload industry in the USA since deregulation in 1980. Turnover in truck load firms averages above 100 percent in good economic times and over 40 percent in bad ones, costing the industry billions of dollars. This research sought a best‐fit regression model to show how a firm might control its own turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper distributed a survey questionnaire to 800 truck drivers at a large US truckload motor carrier. The questionnaire included over 50 items with a seven‐point Likert‐type scale from strongly agree to strongly disagree. The paper analyzed 309 usable responses using regression analysis with scaled scores on aspects of a driver's job. The dependent variable was intent to quit (ITQ).

Findings

Research on truck driver turnover has focused on driver attitudes as determinants of ITQ, looking at drivers' attitudes that might lead to higher ITQ and higher turnover. In this research, drivers' attitudes toward top management and dispatchers did not influence ITQ, a surprising result that raises questions and suggests a new direction for research.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in only one firm. Its results may not generalize to all trucking firms, especially not to smaller firms. The method used, however, does generalize. Other firms may use this same approach to identify the causes of turnover in their organizations.

Practical implications

This research demonstrated a method for researching the causes of driver turnover that are practical and accessible to firms of all sizes.

Social implications

This research was conducted in only one firm. Its results may not generalize to all trucking firms, especially not to smaller firms. The method used, however, does generalize. Other firms may use this same approach to identify the causes of turnover in their organizations.

Originality/value

The results of this research suggest that the relationship between drivers and the firm have changed, probably because of the extensive use of new technology. The methods used here will help large trucking firms allocate resources for driver management and retention. They may also help smaller firms understand the implications of investment in sophisticated technology.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Yoshinori Suzuki

To develop a decision tool that may be used conveniently by motor carriers to answer the questions: “Does my company need to lower the truck driver turnover rate?” and “If…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a decision tool that may be used conveniently by motor carriers to answer the questions: “Does my company need to lower the truck driver turnover rate?” and “If so, by how much?”

Design/methodology/approach

Combines statistical and mathematical procedures to present a method that calculates, by considering a variety of carrier characteristics, the “desirable” truck driver turnover rate for each carrier.

Findings

Simulation results imply that the model may be used by all types of motor carriers, regardless of whether their drivers exhibit homogeneous or heterogeneous job‐quitting behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The “desirable” turnover rate may be used as both: the critical value that determines whether a carrier needs to reduce the turnover rate or not (i.e. the upper bound of the acceptable turnover range), and the approximate target turnover rate to be attained in the short run.

Originality/value

The proposed model shall help motor carriers identify their “target” driver turnover rates to be attained in the short run. The model is available in a user‐friendly PC format from the author (Excel file with VBA), so that no technical calculations are required by the users when using the model.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Stephen LeMay and Scott B. Keller

The purpose of this paper is to examine the past 50 years of driver research from a historical context linked to the political and economic developments of the US motor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the past 50 years of driver research from a historical context linked to the political and economic developments of the US motor carrier industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review was conducted and studies were targeted that exemplified eras of historic change pertaining to trucking published within the top-tier logistics journals.

Findings

Distinctive categorizations of driver research emerged: organizing era from 1930 to 1949, era of the collective mind from 1950 to 1979, era of the individual from 1980 to 2009 and the era of the driver as extension of the firm from 2010 to present. Research streams are highly influenced by current industry developments, economic conditions and the political landscape.

Research limitations/implications

The chronological framework of research established specific time-based eras. An alternative framework or other emerging eras may be conceived as scholars consider factors in addition to those explored within this research.

Practical implications

Managers within developing countries may leverage the research within a specific era to help resolve driver problems that have already been researched in the USA. Scholars are encouraged to further study truck drivers as critical extensions of the firm in light of the advances in autonomous vehicles, drones and other technology impacting the motor carrier industry.

Social implications

For nearly a half century, the turnover of truck drivers has been a major issue. This research provides driver managers with the knowledge to better understand and to more adequately provide for the needs and welfare of truck drivers.

Originality/value

This research is the first to fully connect the research and developments pertaining to the motor carrier industry, the occupation of truck driving and the historical developments of US policy and the economy.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Hokey Min and Ahmed Emam

Chronic driver turnover can adversely influence a trucking firm's competitiveness through disrupted delivery services, equipment down time and excessive recruiting…

Abstract

Chronic driver turnover can adversely influence a trucking firm's competitiveness through disrupted delivery services, equipment down time and excessive recruiting expenses. Thus, a key to the survival of the trucking firm rests with its ability to recruit and retain qualified drivers who are less likely to cause turnover. In an effort to develop the ways to recruit and retain those drivers, we propose data mining techniques. Based on an empirical study of trucking firms in the USA, this paper not only develops a viable driver recruitment and retention strategy, but it also demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed data mining techniques.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Steven A. Schulz, Kyle W. Luthans and Jake G. Messersmith

A number of studies have identified a relationship between the positive psychological capital (PsyCap) of employees and desirable outcomes. Given current and projected…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of studies have identified a relationship between the positive psychological capital (PsyCap) of employees and desirable outcomes. Given current and projected shortages of truck drivers that could become the “Achilles heel” of the global supply chain, the purpose of this paper is to test whether and how drivers’ attitudes and PsyCap relates to their intentions to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from truckload drivers (n=251) from two major transportation firms, correlation, regression, and path analysis were conducted to assess the relationship between job satisfaction, organizational commitment, PsyCap, and intentions to quit.

Findings

Results of this study indicate strong positive relationships between PsyCap and job satisfaction and organizational commitment and a strong negative correlation with intentions to quit. Structural equation modeling suggests that job satisfaction and organizational commitment mediate the relationship between PsyCap and turnover intentions.

Practical implications

Managerial implications for recognizing, understanding, and developing PsyCap in the transportation industry are derived from this study. Specific training guidelines are provided.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is that it provides, for the first time, empirical evidence that PsyCap can be utilized to improve retention rates for truckload drivers.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2014

Belverd E. Needles, Marian Powers, Mark L. Frigo and Anton Shigaev

The present study investigates whether companies that exhibit high performance characteristics in the pre-financial crisis period can maintain their high performance in…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study investigates whether companies that exhibit high performance characteristics in the pre-financial crisis period can maintain their high performance in the financial crisis period of 2007–2009 and, in particular, the post-financial crisis period of 2010–2011.

Methodology

The current study of 1,473 companies in 25 countries and 66 industries (MSCI index) (1) extends the empirical research of prior studies through the year 2011; (2) identifies the operating characteristics (performance drivers and performance measures) and associated risk factors which were most critical with regard to sustaining, exiting, and entering HPC companies during the five 10-year periods since 1998–2007, and (3) summarizes conclusions about HPC results from the 13 ten-year periods (1989–1998 to 2002–2011) in this stream of research.

Findings

(1) Companies that sustain high performance over periods of financial stress clearly excel in asset turnover performance driver and on the performance measures of growth in revenues, profit margin, return on equity and return on assets. Sustaining HPC had less debt than other companies and consistent cash flow yields. Operating turnover ratios became less important in recent years as an indicator of high performance. (2) Although exiting companies maintained profitability, financial risk and liquidity, the key factor in their dropping out of HPC status is their failure to grow revenues. (3) Entering companies did not exhibit the superior performance in all categories.

Practical implications and value

The results provide strategic direction for management of companies that aspire to HPC status and to maintain HPC status once gained, particularly in times of global financial stress.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Behavioral Implications and Human Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-378-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Marco DiRenzo, Kathryn Aten, Blythe Rosikiewicz, Jason Barnes, Caroline Brown, Adam Shapiro and Benny Volkmann

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of turnover intention in extra roles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of turnover intention in extra roles.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods study began with a qualitative analysis of interviews of US Marine Corps reservists, which identified drivers of turnover and suggested a predictive model and hypotheses, tested with a subsequent quantitative analysis.

Findings

The results show that relations, meaning, and role conflict predict embeddedness in the US Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR), which is negatively related to turnover intentions. The sub-dimensions of the three drivers are clarified.

Research limitations/implications

The research contributes to understanding the antecedents of embeddedness and turnover in extra roles. It also highlights extra roles as a source of role conflict. This study was limited to the USMCR, one extra role. All participants in the qualitative phase of the study were male officers. Although the quantitative study included enlisted and officers, men were still more strongly represented. The results should be replicated across different types of extra roles and should include different job types and personal characteristics.

Originality/value

This study develops and tests a predictive model of embeddedness and turnover in the understudied context of salient extra roles. It clarifies antecedents of embeddedness in an extra role context and indicates that salient extra roles may be an additional source of role conflict in people’s lives.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

This paper aims to reveal that, in an industry where new‐driver retention has been seen as “too difficult”, First UK Bus Division took the strategic decision to tackle the issue.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reveal that, in an industry where new‐driver retention has been seen as “too difficult”, First UK Bus Division took the strategic decision to tackle the issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how the company, with the help of a learning and development business, researched the causes, designed an approach to resolve them, piloted the approach and measured the impact.

Findings

The paper details how the company has significantly reduced the turnover of new drivers, increased first‐time pass rates in the passenger‐carrying vehicle (PCV) test, improved internal communications, reduced bureaucracy and built a more clearly defined career structure.

Practical implications

The paper reveals that the new induction process has saved the business more than £1 million in recruitment and training costs.

Originality/value

The paper points out the wide‐ranging organizational benefits that can result from a proper induction process.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Paul Lyons and Randall Bandura

The purpose of this viewpoint is to examine employee turnover intention to include how it manifests itself, aspects of the work environment or perceptions that tend to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this viewpoint is to examine employee turnover intention to include how it manifests itself, aspects of the work environment or perceptions that tend to drive the behavior, and the turnover intentions that management has difficulty thwarting. We offer some suggestions for managers and supervisors to use to influence talented employees to remain on the job.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach was to review relevant empirical research and opinion articles for the period 2005 to the present that addressed the topic of turnover intention and to summarize findings that had particular relevance for practicing managers and supervisors.

Findings

Findings made clear that sound, proven management practices could have a substantial influence on retaining quality employees. The focal areas are: engaged employees who typically are high performers and who possess job satisfaction, and universal psychological needs. Proactively attending (for example: providing timely, frequent, feedback on performance) per these two domains can assist managers to retain employees.

Practical implications

There are many initiatives a manager or supervisor may take to assist employees to want to remain with an organization. Many of these initiatives have little to do with major policy issues, compensation, or other financial matters. Often, poor management practices are the drivers of turnover intention.

Originality/value

The value of this article is that it provides a practical view of the dynamics or turnover intention. And, grounded on empirical study of the concept, we provide some avenues for management to attend to in order to assist employees find satisfying work arrangements.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2005

Richard Iles

Abstract

Details

Public Transport in Developing Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045681-2

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