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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Jiyoung Kim, Sunmee Choi and Drew Martin

Applying social capital and the social exchange theories to customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions, this study aims to propose that interaction quality perceptions affect…

Abstract

Purpose

Applying social capital and the social exchange theories to customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions, this study aims to propose that interaction quality perceptions affect the customer-to-service provider’s interaction quality perceptions in a prolonged, close-proximity service setting. Examining this exogenous dimension, the study also tests socio-emotional support perception’s mediating effect and customer proactiveness’ moderating effect.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts and modifies existing general services of C2C interaction dimensions to fit the health-care context. An in-person survey of 192 neurosurgery inpatients and their care-giving companions (both considered health-care customers) provides data to validate the dimensions and test the model. Structural equation modeling and moderated regression test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results show that affirmative C2C interactions positively affect the customer’s perceived socio-emotional support, whereas negative C2C interactions show no significant impact. Greater socio-emotional support acuity improves customers’ assurance and empathy quality perceptions about the provider’s service. Customer proactiveness moderates C2C interaction dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the research of the C2C interaction to include their effect on service quality perceptions in a prolonged close-proximity service setting. Study results validate C2C interaction’s dimensions specific to an inpatient setting. Finally, this study extends the application of social capital theory and social exchange theory to C2C settings.

Practical implications

Findings emphasize the importance of managing C2C interactions during prolonged, close-proximity service delivery processes to improve customer perceptions of service quality. Results suggest that managers should monitor customer proactiveness to maximize positive C2C interactions’ positive effects while minimizing negative C2C interactions.

Originality/value

Prior service quality studies tend to focus on managing internal resources (staff, processes or physical environment); however, this study examines how the interactions among external resources create a halo effect and impact customers’ service quality perceptions. Results inform methods to improve their quality perceptions by better managing exogenous factors. The study also responds to calls for research on how C2C interactions affect functional service contexts (vs hedonic service contexts).

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Robin DiPietro, Drew Martin and Thomas Pratt

This paper aims to investigate talent management (TM) practices of independent fine dining restaurant (FDR) organizations and explores why employee retention rates in FDRs…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate talent management (TM) practices of independent fine dining restaurant (FDR) organizations and explores why employee retention rates in FDRs are higher than other restaurants. This research adds to the TM literature by surfacing attitudes and influences that lead to employee retention.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study collects data using McCracken’s (1988) long interview method to provide insights into value similarities and differences between employees and independent restaurant managers. Fourteen interviews at two independent FDRs inform the results. This study employs a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Study results show that people take pride in working for the restaurants and the culture within the restaurant inspires a higher level of self-esteem. This independent, family-owned environment helps employees and managers achieve higher work performance and satisfy overall lifestyle needs. Respondents report their employment helps them to do things that bring out the best in them and allows them to accomplish other things that they want in life. The study also suggests that a shared value system between employees and managers creates a more stable workforce and longer tenure.

Research limitations/implications

The current study examines only two independent family-owned FDRs, so generalization is limited. The current study uses grounded theory to expand on research in the TM literature.

Practical implications

If owners and managers of FDR focus on addressing employees’ higher-order motivational needs, they have a better chance of retaining employees. Losing productive employees has high direct and indirect costs, and the restaurant industry is plagued with high turnover. Independent restaurants also need to evaluate their new employee orientations because unstructured training contributes to an environment of uncertainty. Developing a positive culture in an FDR is possible with a focused, family-oriented business. This work culture takes time to develop. Recruiting and selection methods to ensure a fit with the culture and values are a cost-effective method to ensure the continuation of this culture. The consistent values between employees and managers in this study demonstrate that hiring for personal values and not necessarily for skills already developed helps with positive TM in FDR.

Originality/value

The current study extends the knowledge in TM, ecological systems theory and motivational needs-based theory through detailed interviews and value analyses. Long interviews and triangulation of the data surface conscious and nonconscious memories from both employees and managers specifically relating to employee retention factors in FDR.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Matthias Dörries

This paper uses a historical case study, the controversy over the possibility of climatic extremes caused by hydrogen bomb tests on Pacific Ocean atolls during the 1950s…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses a historical case study, the controversy over the possibility of climatic extremes caused by hydrogen bomb tests on Pacific Ocean atolls during the 1950s, to show how, in a context of few scientific data and high uncertainty, political affiliations and public concerns shaped two types of argumentation, the “energy” and the “precautionary” arguments.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic analysis of publications 1954–1956: scientific and semiscientific articles, publications of C.-N. Martin and contemporary newspaper articles, especially from the Asia–Pacific region.

Findings

First, epistemological and scientific reasoning about the likelihood of extreme natural events aligned to political convictions and pressure. Second, a geographical and social distribution of arguments: the relativizing “energy argument” prevailed in English-language scientific journals, while the “precautionary argument” dominated in popular journals and newspapers published worldwide. Third, while the “energy argument” attained general scientific consensus within two years, it lost out in the long run. The proponents of the “precautionary argument” raised relevant research questions that, though first rejected in the 1950s, later exposed the fallacies of the “energy argument” (shown for the case of the climatologist William W. Kellogg).

Originality/value

In contrast to the existing secondary literature, this paper presents a balanced view of the weaknesses and strengths of two lines of arguments in the 1950s. Further, this historical study sheds light on how once-discarded scientific theories may ultimately be reconsidered in a completely different political and scientific context, thus justifying the original precautionary argument.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Reece Walters

In 2018, the World Health Organization released its latest report on air pollution identifying that seven million people die annually as a result of poor air quality…

Abstract

In 2018, the World Health Organization released its latest report on air pollution identifying that seven million people die annually as a result of poor air quality. Moreover, it is estimated that 90% of the world's population is exposed to ‘dangerous levels’ of air pollution (WHO, 2018a). This is an alarming news, given the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal number three seeks to ‘substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemical and air, water and soil pollution and contamination’ (WHO, 2016). In addition, the WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has publicly stated that ‘…air pollution threatens us all, but the poorest and most marginalised people bear the brunt of the burden… If we don't take urgent action on air pollution, we will never come close to achieving sustainable development’ (WHO, 2018b). This chapter explores the political economy of global air pollution including an analysis of international trade that perpetuates and exacerbates emissions and the environmental injustices associated with global warming and air quality ill health. It also draws on discourses of power, harm and violence to analyse air pollution and climate change within frameworks of green criminology and atmospheric justice.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Drew Martin and Arch G. Woodside

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce eight training exercises developed for tourism executive decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce eight training exercises developed for tourism executive decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces the papers in this special issue and discusses the need for experiential learning techniques for adult learners.

Findings

It was found that applied learning exercises are more effective than cognitive learning experiences in adult education.

Originality/value

The paper provides an introduction to experiential learning exercises for tourism and hospitality training.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Drew Martin and Leonardo Ciano

Social‐cultural and structural arguments have been used to explain why Japan's legal culture is different than other industrialized nations; however, both arguments lack…

Abstract

Social‐cultural and structural arguments have been used to explain why Japan's legal culture is different than other industrialized nations; however, both arguments lack data about client usage. This paper examines the use of Japanese lawyers by businesses in Japan. Senior executives from 572 Japanese and foreign businesses responded to a survey about their use of legal services. Japanese businesses are found to retain lawyers more frequently for legal action and corporate procedural matters, but foreign businesses are more likely to retain lawyers for government compliance activities. While both theoretical arguments help to explain Japan's legal culture, the common denominator is the small number of Japanese lawyers.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Drew Martin

This paper aims to demonstrate deep gaze using a Japanese Shinto wedding ceremony as an example. Some long-term tourists develop an intimate understanding of the host…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate deep gaze using a Japanese Shinto wedding ceremony as an example. Some long-term tourists develop an intimate understanding of the host country’s culture by gaining access to authentic experiences typically limited to the locals. These native visitors experience a deep gaze.

Design/methodology/approach

Combing subjective personal introspection (SPI) and confirmatory personal introspection (CPI), the author’s 76 wedding photographs are examined critically.

Findings

Results demonstrate how a native visitor uses SPI and CPI analyses of native gaze. While the Shinto wedding ceremony’s authenticity mixes traditional and evolutionary elements, the ceremony is best viewed as a Gestalt experience. The evidence suggests authenticity need not have deep roots in the culture.

Research limitations/implications

The findings serve as only one configuration of many possible gazes. Tourist Gaze 4.0 is a set of complex antecedent conditions and multiple configurations.

Originality/value

Using photographs taken by native family members, this paper demonstrates how SPI and CPI identify deep gaze through a different lens.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Florian Bauer, Martin Friesl and Mai Anh Dao

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are an important strategic tool for continuous adaptation, sustainable corporate development and external growth. At the same time, M&As…

Abstract

Purpose

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are an important strategic tool for continuous adaptation, sustainable corporate development and external growth. At the same time, M&As involve high levels of risk with mixed performance results even under normal circumstances. Even though the M&A market was continuously growing for the last decade, it was abruptly ended by the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic as executives were more concerned about liquidity than with long-term growth strategies. This raises the question how M&A behaviour is affected by the economic fall-out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed method research design was employed in this study.

Findings

The authors particularly investigate how target selection as well as synergy management are affected by the pandemic. The study analysis reveals four archetypical responses to the COVID-19 crisis. The authors describe those responses in detail and analyse antecedents that seem to influence firms' acquisition behaviour during the pandemic.

Originality/value

The paper draws on survey and interview data of M&A practitioners.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

T.D. Webb

Given its importance in library operations and in the profession, reference service should be an important consideration in any library reorganization, regardless of the…

Abstract

Given its importance in library operations and in the profession, reference service should be an important consideration in any library reorganization, regardless of the other factors contributing to the decision to reorganize. But because the conditions prompting a reorganization are often sudden and extraordinary, a library manager may overlook their impact on reference service, reacting instead to the more immediate pressures of budget cuts, staff losses, and other constraints that have been externally imposed. With informed planning, however, even a reorganization begun in a negative context can result in continued good reference service or even place the library in a position to improve reference quality.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Tom DeWitt and Drew Martin

The purpose of this paper is to show how to identify red flags in letters responding to customer complaints and demonstrate elements of effective response letters.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how to identify red flags in letters responding to customer complaints and demonstrate elements of effective response letters.

Design/methodology/approach

Using actual form letter responses, the paper shows how to identify weaknesses in form letters and remedies for improving their credibility. Measurement criteria follow the concept of fairness which has roots in Kant's moral idealism theory.

Findings

The paper identifies key elements that should be included in credible form letters. A combination of distributive, procedural, and interactional justice is required for an effective response.

Practical implications

Tourism and hospitality managers issuing effective template responses (form letters) have the opportunity to improve consumer trust, loyalty, and future complaint intentions.

Originality/value

The training exercises provide examples for managers and consultants to teach employees how to develop effective responses to customer complaints.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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