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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Curie Scott

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Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

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Abstract

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Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Curie Scott

Abstract

Details

Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Yun-Fang Tu, Gwo-Jen Hwang, Shu-Yen Chen, Chiulin Lai and Chuan-Miao Chen

This study aims to compare similarities and differences in library and information science (LIS) and non-LIS undergraduates’ conceptions and perceptions of smart libraries…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare similarities and differences in library and information science (LIS) and non-LIS undergraduates’ conceptions and perceptions of smart libraries via drawing analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a total of 156 undergraduate students described their perceptions of smart libraries as drawings and textual descriptions. A modified coding scheme with 8 categories and 51 subcategories was used to analyse the undergraduate students’ drawings.

Findings

Most of the undergraduate students’ conceptions of smart libraries still involve self-checkout and learning/reading, focusing on information appliances, technical services, activities and objects. The differences are that the LIS undergraduates’ drawings showed smart libraries with robots, interactive book borrowing with technology tools, intelligent services, location-aware services or mobile applications, whereas non-LIS undergraduates presented smart libraries as readers (learners), other activities and no smart technology services. LIS undergraduates focused on providing patron services with technologies. Non-LIS undergraduates were more likely to draw a complex space with immediate access to books or digital resources, quiet reading and the freedom to engage in library activities.

Originality/value

The results provide a baseline for future research on the topic and provide preliminary evidence of using the methods to discern LIS and non-LIS undergraduates’ conceptions of smart libraries.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2004

Judith A. Chafel and Carin Neitzel

What are children’s responses to storybook characters portrayed as socioeconomically disadvantaged? Do these responses vary by gender, race, socioeconomic status, and…

Abstract

What are children’s responses to storybook characters portrayed as socioeconomically disadvantaged? Do these responses vary by gender, race, socioeconomic status, and setting? Sixty-two 8-year-old-children individually listened and responded to a story about a soup kitchen using two different communication systems: drawings and words. Categories generated from the data were analyzed using chi-square analyses, yielding statistically significant findings for each of the variables of interest. Results offer a unique, detailed picture of the conceptual schemas of 8-year-old children about poverty.

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Social Contexts of Early Education, and Reconceptualizing Play (II)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-146-0

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Abstract

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Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Curie Scott

Abstract

Details

Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Sharon Feeney and John Hogan

This paper aims to present an interpretation of freehand drawings produced by a sample of final year degree level learners in response to the question: “What is civic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an interpretation of freehand drawings produced by a sample of final year degree level learners in response to the question: “What is civic engagement”? The aim in using this approach, with final year degree learners from different countries, but pursuing the same degree, was to compare and contrast their understanding of civic engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Learners completed their drawings and then discussed their drawings in small groups. All of their drawings were initially examined quantitatively before a sample of six drawings were selected for in-depth qualitative examination.

Findings

Using learner-generated drawings enables learners convey visually what can be challenging to verbalise. After the exercise, some learners discovered that they had a good basic appreciation of civic engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Describing civic engagement pictorially forced participants to think about what the essence of civic engagement was for them.

Originality/value

This study shows how a collaborative learning experience, rather than a competitive comparison of performance, facilitates learners readily demonstrating their level of understanding and appreciation for civic engagement.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Anna Katrine Hougaard

Architectural drawing is changing because architects today draw with computers. Due to this change digital diagrams employed by computational architectural practices are…

Abstract

Architectural drawing is changing because architects today draw with computers. Due to this change digital diagrams employed by computational architectural practices are often emphasized as powerful structures of control and organisation in the design process. But there are also diagrams, which do not follow computational logic worth paying attention to. In the following I will investigate one such other kind of diagram, a sketch diagram, which has a play-like capacity where rules can be invented and changed as you go. In that way, sketch diagrams are related to steered indeterminacy and authorial ways of directing behaviour of artefacts and living things without controlling this behaviour completely. I analyse a musical composition by John Cage as an example of a sketch diagram, and then hypothesize that orthogonal, architectural drawing can work in similar ways. Thereby I hope to point out important affordance of architectural drawing as a ¬hybrid between the openness of hand-sketching and the rule-basedness of diagramming, an affordance which might be useful in the migrational zone of current architectural drawing where traditional hand drawing techniques and computer drawing techniques are being combined with each other.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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