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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Arch G. Woodside, Marylouise Caldwell and Jennifer Rebecca Calhoun

This study defines service breakdowns, service breakdown prevention, and “servicide” as they relate to service-dominant logic. The study reviews relevant relevant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study defines service breakdowns, service breakdown prevention, and “servicide” as they relate to service-dominant logic. The study reviews relevant relevant literature on these three topics. This study categorizes real-life examples into five levels of dramatic turns toward service degradations and breakdowns that range from customer being aware but not mentioning service inadequacy to the service breakdown resulting in death of the customer or service provider. Taking initial steps in developing dramatic turn theory and improving the practice of service breakdown prevention are the major contributions of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a conceptual contribution that includes a dramatic turn role-playing exercise (at category 4 among five categories of dramatic turns for pedagogical/on-site enacting/practicing and training of service professionals. The study emphasizes and shows how to create and enact role-playing scenarios to increase requisite variety, provide training modules and increase skills/expertise in service enactment contexts.

Findings

Before explicit reviewing of the dramatic-turn performances, some of the participants as actors as well as audience members in role-play dramatic turns were quick to blame the customer behavior as the principal cause for the service breakdown. The study’s exposition stresses prevention of negative dramatic turns follows from experiencing and coaching a wide variety of customer and server interactions – achieving “richness” in enactments.

Research limitations/implications

Research on service breakdown prevention needs to include field experiments on the efficacy of training programs for effective management of dramatic turns.

Practical implications

Training of service workers and service managers in experiencing/participating in dramatic turns is likely to be beneficial in reducing the severe adverse outcomes and unintended consequences of service breakdowns. Prevention, not only service failure recovery, needs to be an explicit focus in hospitality management training and assessment.

Social implications

This study suggests tools and procedures to reduce the instances of the need for service breakdown recoveries.

Originality/value

The study calls attention and contributes a way forward in managing dramatic turns in hospitality service contexts. The study provides a nascent configurational theoretical foundation of dramatic-turn propositions. Given the severity of financial costs and loss of brand/firm reputation following the occurrence of extreme dramatic turns, a research focus on service breakdown prevention is necessary.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

This article describes the dramatic turn‐around achieved at a UK toiletries and cosmetics plant which, once faced with closure, is now described by Procter & Gamble as one

Abstract

Purpose

This article describes the dramatic turn‐around achieved at a UK toiletries and cosmetics plant which, once faced with closure, is now described by Procter & Gamble as one of its best suppliers, with a P&G audit score of 100 percent.

Design/methodology/approach

Concentrates on the role of training in changing the organizational culture at Creative Outsourcing Solutions International Ltd's manufacturing site at Littlehampton, West Sussex, UK.

Findings

Details how, as a result of the training, the confidence of employees has increased and it has become normal practice for employees to be involved in decision making and problem solving. The company has increased its customer base and turnover, and reduced its inventory by 53 percent.

Practical implications

Demonstrates that the company has established training and learning as part of the solution and not a luxury, and has more employees who can participate in and drive improvement initiatives.

Originality/value

Shows how the training has created a solid foundation for learning on the site.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 3 October 2016

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's prospects.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB214002

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 2 December 2019

The investigation into the assassination of prominent journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia has taken a dramatic turn with the interrogation of senior Maltese government…

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Qingliang Tang and Amy Lau

Compares China‘s financial reporting systems before and after the reforms of 1993, which is seen as a dramatic turning point. Analyses the economic factors driving…

Abstract

Compares China‘s financial reporting systems before and after the reforms of 1993, which is seen as a dramatic turning point. Analyses the economic factors driving accounting reforms and examines in more detail the influence of the developing capital market and increasing foreign investment. Tabulates the differences between the format, contents and types of financial statements and disclosures and financial ratios, before and after reform. Gives examples of some remaining problems, summarizes the key features of the new system and urges Chinese accountants and policy makers to adjust Western principles and systems to the unique environment of China.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 9 July 2015

Russia's economic outlook.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB200824

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2014

Richard Lachmann

I trace and explain how the ratcheting of corporate mergers and deregulation transformed the structure of elite relations in the United States from 1960 to 2010. Prior to…

Abstract

I trace and explain how the ratcheting of corporate mergers and deregulation transformed the structure of elite relations in the United States from 1960 to 2010. Prior to the 1970s there was a high degree of elite unity and consensus, enforced by Federal regulation and molded by structure of U.S. government, around a set of policies and practices: interventionism abroad, progressive tax rates, heavy state investment in infrastructure and education, and a rising level of social spending. I find that economic decline, the loss of geopolitical hegemony, and mobilization from the left and right are unable to account for the specific policies that both Democratic and Republican Administrations furthered since the 1970s or for the uneven decline in state capacity that were intended and unintended consequences of the post-1960s political realignment and policy changes. Instead, the realignment and restructuring of elites and classes that first transformed politics and degraded government in the 1970s in turn made possible further shifts in the capacities of American political actors in both the state and civil society. I explain how that process operated and how it produced specific policy outcomes and created new limits on mass political mobilization while creating opportunities for autarkic elites to appropriate state powers and resources for themselves.

Details

The United States in Decline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-829-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Juho Hamari and Max Sjöblom

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why do people spectate eSports on the internet. The authors define eSports (electronic sports) as “a form of sports where the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why do people spectate eSports on the internet. The authors define eSports (electronic sports) as “a form of sports where the primary aspects of the sport are facilitated by electronic systems; the input of players and teams as well as the output of the eSports system are mediated by human-computer interfaces.” In more practical terms, eSports refer to competitive video gaming (broadcasted on the internet).

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs the motivations scale for sports consumption which is one of the most widely applied measurement instruments for sports consumption in general. The questionnaire was designed and pre-tested before distributing to target respondents (n=888). The reliability and validity of the instrument both met the commonly accepted guidelines. The model was assessed first by examining its measurement model and then the structural model.

Findings

The results indicate that escapism, acquiring knowledge about the games being played, novelty and eSports athlete aggressiveness were found to positively predict eSport spectating frequency.

Originality/value

During recent years, eSports (electronic sports) and video game streaming have become rapidly growing forms of new media in the internet driven by the growing provenance of (online) games and online broadcasting technologies. Today, hundreds of millions of people spectate eSports. The present investigation presents a large study on gratification-related determinants of why people spectate eSports on the internet. Moreover, the study proposes a definition for eSports and further discusses how eSports can be seen as a form of sports.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Arch G. Woodside

Case study research frequently includes collecting and interpreting stories individuals tell about their lives and event that they believe that they know about. Chapter 3…

Abstract

Synopsis

Case study research frequently includes collecting and interpreting stories individuals tell about their lives and event that they believe that they know about. Chapter 3 discusses storytelling theory and describes case study research in consumer behavior of stories that consumers tell about buying and using products and services. Storytelling is pervasive through life. Much information is stored, indexed, and retrieved in the form of stories. Although lectures tend to put people to sleep, stories move them to action. People relate to each other in terms of stories — and products and brands often play both central and peripheral roles in their stories. To aid storytelling research in consumer psychology, this chapter develops a narrative theory that describes how consumers use brands as props or anthropomorphic actors in stories they report about themselves and others. Such drama enactments enable these storytellers to experience powerful myths that reflect psychological archetypes. The chapter includes findings from case study research that probes propositions of the theory. Implications for consumer psychology and marketing practice follow the discussion of the findings.

Details

Case Study Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-461-4

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Abstract

Details

The Development of Socialism, Social Democracy and Communism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-373-1

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