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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Douglas M. Watson

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between cultural heritage and attitudes toward fraud. The data indicates that the culturalisation process is complex, with…

2576

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between cultural heritage and attitudes toward fraud. The data indicates that the culturalisation process is complex, with no apparent absolutes. People claiming different cultural heritage do differ in how they approve of fraud in general, but what is equally significant is how these same people universally evaluated specific types of fraud. A comprehensive analysis of the results, taking into consideration all the potential correlates – cultural heritage as well as age, education, gender and occupation – indicates that the respondents may have been influenced by an overarching “corporate culture” that tends to assimilate diverse attitudes into a more universal standard of behaviour.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in…

7380

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Nina S. Pflugfelder

The purpose of this study is to investigate how Knowledge Management (KM) and Intellectual Capital (IC) can increase the organizational performance of ambulatory healthcare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how Knowledge Management (KM) and Intellectual Capital (IC) can increase the organizational performance of ambulatory healthcare providers and how such performance can be assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the PRISMA guidelines, a structured review of peer-reviewed English-speaking articles up to 31st December 2019 was conducted. A search of ACM Digital Library, Cochrane Library, DARE, EBSCOHost, Medline, ProQuest, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Web of Science produced 8,391 results. All studies that did not examine the impact of KM initiatives on organizational performance in an ambulatory healthcare provider setting were eliminated. The final sample of 31 studies was examined regarding the design of the KM initiatives as well as the performance concepts and indicators employed.

Findings

A range of KM tools and methods (Electronic Health Records, Clinical Decision Support, Health Information Technology, Training, Communities of Practice) have been shown to improve healthcare processes but evidence of an impact on outcomes remains mixed. Performance indicators focus on medical quality but rarely capture economic or social performance. Indicators have been adapted from the medical field, but do not adequately capture IC and KM-induced performance.

Originality/value

This review provides an overview of KM initiatives in ambulatory healthcare and assesses the associated performance metrics through an IC lens. Thereby, it enables further research on the interplay of IC, KM and performance in ambulatory care and points to several research gaps. It provides managers with guidance for designing KM initiatives in their organizations

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Mai T. Pham Evans, Daniel J. Tisak and Douglas F. Williamson

The purpose of this descriptive research article is to investigate current benchmarking practices (2001 to 2010) so as to determine new approaches which may transcend the…

2108

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this descriptive research article is to investigate current benchmarking practices (2001 to 2010) so as to determine new approaches which may transcend the traditional benchmarking model developed by Watson.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous generations of benchmarking have been developed and utilized in the last century. Watson's generational benchmarking model predicted that global benchmarking would encompass future benchmarking. Watson's Strategic Benchmarking: Reloaded with Six Sigma links Six Sigma strategies with strategic planning and benchmarking.

Findings

Most articles and dissertations reviewed indicate usage of existing benchmarking practices. The research also uncovered complementary approaches, including the Boyd Cycle, which underscores flexibility and speed, Six Sigma tools to implement significant business change decisions, the insights of Hoshin Kanri's philosophy of management, which fosters communication such that everyone in an organization is working toward a common goal, and “rapidmarking” of business improvements.

Practical implications

These approaches, while complementary, do not represent a “new generation” of benchmarking.

Originality/value

The value of this article comes from making the connection between the very beginnings of benchmarking techniques and the latest techniques in use today.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Wendy L. Hassett and Douglas J. Watson

An annual citizen survey can be a valuable component of the municipal budgeting process for cities that elect to institutionalize the process as a way to translate citizen…

Abstract

An annual citizen survey can be a valuable component of the municipal budgeting process for cities that elect to institutionalize the process as a way to translate citizen feedback into budgetary priorities. This article explores uses of citizen surveys in identifying latent needs of the community that may not be detected through public hearings or other citizen participation methods. The authors suggest that properly developed and conducted citizen surveys can provide decision-makers with research data that will lead to more responsive public spending and debt financing decisions. The article concludes with a case study of Auburn, Alabama, a city that has successfully used citizen surveys in its budgeting system for the past seventeen years.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Alessandra Girlando, Simon Grima, Engin Boztepe, Sharon Seychell, Ramona Rupeika-Apoga and Inna Romanova

Purpose: Risk is a multifaceted concept, and its identification requires complex approaches that are often misunderstood. The consequence is that decisions are based on limited…

Abstract

Purpose: Risk is a multifaceted concept, and its identification requires complex approaches that are often misunderstood. The consequence is that decisions are based on limited perception rather than the full value and meaning of what risk is, as a result, the way it is being tackled is incorrect. The individuals are often limited in their perceptions and ideas and do not embrace the full multifaceted nature of risk. Regulators and individuals want to follow norms and checklists or overuse models, simulations, and templates, thereby reducing responsibility for decision-making. At the same time, the wider use of technology and rules reduces the critical thinking of individuals. We advance the automation process by building robots that follow protocols and forget about the part of risk assessment that cannot be programed. Therefore, with this study, the objective of this study was to discover how people define risk, the influencing factors of risk perception and how they behave toward this perception. The authors also determine how the perception differed with age, gender, marital status, education level and region. The novelty of the research is related to individual risk perception during COVID-19, as this is a new and unknown phenomenon. Methodology: The research is based on the analysis of the self-administered purposely designed questionnaires we distributed across different social media platforms between February and June 2020 in Europe and in some cases was carried out as a interview over communication platforms such as “Skype,” “Zoom” and “Microsoft Teams.” The questionnaire was divided into four parts: Section 1 was designed to collect demographic information from the participants; Section 2 included risk definition statements obtained from literature and a preliminary discussion with peers; Section 3 included risk behavior statements; and Section 4 included statements on risk perception experiences. A five-point Likert Scale was provided, and participants were required to answer along a scale of “1” for “Strongly Agree” to “5” for “Strongly Disagree.” Participants also had the option to elaborate further and provide additional comments in an open-ended box provided at the end of the section. 466 valid responses were received. Thematic analysis was carried out to analyze the interviews and the open-ended questions, while the questionnaire responses were analyzed using various quantitative methods on IBM SPSS (version 23). Findings: The results of the analysis indicate that individuals evaluate the risk before making a decision and view risk as both a loss and opportunity. The study identifies nine factors influencing risk perception. Nevertheless, it must be emphasized that we can continue to develop models and rules, but as long as the risk is not understood, we will never achieve anything.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Social Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-931-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Wei‐Huei Hsu, Abdullah Mamun and Lawrence C. Rose

This paper seeks to examine whether the market values the monitoring activity undertaken by a quality bank in the presence of a credit rating agency. Specifically, the question is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine whether the market values the monitoring activity undertaken by a quality bank in the presence of a credit rating agency. Specifically, the question is asked whether the quality of a lead lending bank influences a market reaction to adverse rating announcements concerning its borrowers.

Design/methodology/approach

The event study methodology and various bank quality proxies (size, growth rate in assets, profitability, capital ratio, bank's credit rating, and ownership) are used to examine the market reaction when a borrower's bank loan rating is placed with negative implication or is downgraded.

Findings

Firms which are certified and monitored by high‐quality banks are less susceptible to negative market reactions when adverse rating announcements are made.

Originality/value

The findings indicate high‐quality lending banks sustain investors' confidence in their borrowers in the face of deteriorating news. The paper argues that investors and borrowers value monitoring from a high‐quality bank, which is an implication of a bank having access to private information about its borrowers.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Douglas J. Watson, Donna Milam Handley and Wendy L. Hassett

Since 1934, the federal government has provided a process for municipalities to declare bankruptcy, and approximately 500 governments have done so. In recent years, an average of…

Abstract

Since 1934, the federal government has provided a process for municipalities to declare bankruptcy, and approximately 500 governments have done so. In recent years, an average of less than one city government declares bankruptcy each year. In this article, the authors identify five factors that contribute to financial distress for cities which, if left unattended, can lead to municipal bankruptcy. This discussion is followed by an examination of the events that led to the bankruptcy of the City of Prichard, Alabama, once a prosperous suburb of Mobile. The authors conclude that this municipal bankruptcy occurred, in large part, because Prichard failed to face the factors of financial distress identified by the authors in the years prior to filing for bankruptcy.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Wayne A. Hochwarter, Ilias Kapoutsis, Samantha L. Jordan, Abdul Karim Khan and Mayowa Babalola

Persistent change has placed considerable pressure on organizations to keep up or fade into obscurity. Firms that remain viable, or even thrive, are staffed with decision-makers…

Abstract

Persistent change has placed considerable pressure on organizations to keep up or fade into obscurity. Firms that remain viable, or even thrive, are staffed with decision-makers who capably steer organizations toward opportunities and away from threats. Accordingly, leadership development has never been more critical. In this chapter, the authors propose that leader development is an inherently dyadic process initiated to communicate formal and informal expectations. The authors focus on the informal component, in the form of organizational politics, as an element of leadership that is critical to employee and company success. The authors advocate that superiors represent the most salient information source for leader development, especially as it relates to political dynamics embedded in work systems. The authors discuss research associated with our conceptualization of dyadic political leader development (DPLD). Specifically, the authors develop DPLD by exploring its conceptual underpinnings as they relate to sensemaking, identity, and social learning theories. Once established, the authors provide a refined discussion of the construct, illustrating its scholarly mechanisms that better explain leader development processes and outcomes. The authors then expand research in the areas of political skill, political will, political knowledge, and political phronesis by embedding our conceptualization of DPLD into a political leadership model. The authors conclude by discussing methodological issues and avenues of future research stemming from the development of DPLD.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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