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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Stuart J. Barnes, Eusebio Scornavacca and Douglas Innes

Wireless and mobile technologies are changing the way that many organizations operate and do business. Mobile business‐to‐employee solutions, especially field force automation…

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Abstract

Purpose

Wireless and mobile technologies are changing the way that many organizations operate and do business. Mobile business‐to‐employee solutions, especially field force automation (FFA), have been widely adopted throughout the planet. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of wireless FFA in trade services organisations in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach to examine two trade services organisations.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that wireless technologies can significantly enhance the benefits of traditional FFA.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with recommendations for future practice and research.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the academic research in this field by examining two organizations that have already implemented their own wireless FFA solutions and have realized benefits and impacts as a result.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 106 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1962

R.D. MACLEOD

Scotland's day of reputation in publishing came with the Foulises, who set a standard not only for Scotland but also for Europe. Robert Foulis, who was inspired by Dr. Francis…

Abstract

Scotland's day of reputation in publishing came with the Foulises, who set a standard not only for Scotland but also for Europe. Robert Foulis, who was inspired by Dr. Francis Hutcheson to become bookseller and printer, opened his shop in Glasgow about 1741. He and his brother Andrew had visited the Continent on occasions, devoting themselves to studying the printing houses there. In a letter written by Thomas Innes of the Scots College of Paris, a well‐known Jacobite, to James Edgar, Secretary to the Chevalier de St. George at Rome, he tells about the departure of the brothers from Paris, and says that they returned home by London bringing with them six or seven hogsheads of books they had bought up in France. On their return to Glasgow, Robert opened out as a bookseller, his printers being Urie & Co., a firm some of whose issues are of higher quality than had to that date been achieved in Scotland. There was an obvious leaning to the classical side in the early Foulis publishing, and this inclination increased as the connexion with the University became cemented.

Details

Library Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2024

Lerato Aghimien, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Douglas Aghimien

The construction workforce plays a crucial role in the successful delivery of any construction project and, eventually, the performance of any construction organisation…

Abstract

The construction workforce plays a crucial role in the successful delivery of any construction project and, eventually, the performance of any construction organisation. Effectively managing these workforces becomes crucial. However, past studies have shown that workforce management within the construction industry has been on the back foot, with workers being seen as resources required to deliver construction projects. This situation begs the need for a construction workforce management model that can be tailored to an organisation’s situation and adopted to manage workers and improve organisational performance effectively. To this end, this chapter reviewed existing workforce management theories, models, and practices to develop a suitable approach towards managing the construction workforce. Ultimately, a strategic workforce management with a classical view using a soft workforce management approach that embraces employees’ empowerment and development through trust was proposed. Five major practices that best suit the soft workforce management approach were identified as key constructs in the proposed construction workforce management model.

Details

Construction Workforce Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83797-019-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Sarah Cunningham

Congratulations cards, gifts, and announcements in newspapers are some features of the social rituals surrounding the birth of a child, normally a happy occasion. A subtle mixture…

Abstract

Congratulations cards, gifts, and announcements in newspapers are some features of the social rituals surrounding the birth of a child, normally a happy occasion. A subtle mixture of public and private activity intermingle in reactions to this unique yet universal event. In this article I intend to explore the rituals and processes involved in hearing and spreading the news of a birth, with particular reference to grandparents. Such a discussion of the announceable features of becoming a grandparent can form the beginning of an assessment of the meaning and significance of grnadparenthood, something which has received little attention in sociological work. In providing an account of the essential features of ‘telling the news’, I hope to generate an understanding both of the procedures used to ‘make sense’ of grandparenthood, and of the structural assumptions and processes underlying the way in which events are announced.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sandra Wachholz, Nancy Artz and Douglas Chene

The literature on climate change knowledge and attitudes has focused on primary and secondary school children. The limited research on college students is dated or narrowly…

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Abstract

Purpose

The literature on climate change knowledge and attitudes has focused on primary and secondary school children. The limited research on college students is dated or narrowly focused. This study aims to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of views about climate change across a wide range of current college students.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed college students in a sample of lower- and upper-division courses in three content areas: knowledge and attitudes about climate change, intentions to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions, and student satisfaction with the amount of current teaching at the university about climate change and suggestions for improvement.

Findings

A strong majority of respondents believe that climate change is real and largely human-induced; a majority express concern about climate change. Yet, students in the sample hold misconceptions about the basic causes and consequences of climate change.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is warranted to understand the college population, so educators can improve and target their educational efforts to the students most in need.

Practical implications

Higher education needs to expand its educational efforts to ensure that all university graduates understand scientific consensus about climate change and are actively engaged as part of the solution in their public and private roles.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by providing a broad portrayal of college student knowledge and engagement with climate change issues, at least for students on one campus. The study is the first to observe noteworthy differences in climate change understanding and concern between college women and men and across academic majors. It is the only study that asks college students how they would like to learn about global warming.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Christina Chiang and Paul Wells

The theory of economic regulation is used to ascertain how and why the failure of regulatory governance in New Zealand contributed to investor losses of $8.5bn following the…

Abstract

Purpose

The theory of economic regulation is used to ascertain how and why the failure of regulatory governance in New Zealand contributed to investor losses of $8.5bn following the collapse of more than 60 public finance companies since 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant documents in the public domain, including government documents, government agency reports, newspaper articles, business journals, academic journals and trade publications were examined to gather evidence for this study.

Findings

This study found that the regulatory and supervisory framework failed to provide the trustee companies with the necessary enforcement powers and/or responsibilities and ensure effective auditor performance.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that, segmenting the market with different regulations for each market segment may discourage competition and may protect private interests rather than the public interest. It was also found that the control mechanisms for monitoring auditor performance are detective rather than preventive in nature which means investor losses from poor auditor performance can only be mitigated and not prevented.

Originality/value

This study analyses the contributing factors to the investor losses.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Sarah Cunningham‐Burley

Denzin has noted that the interview is a ‘conversational production, anticipated in the investigator's mind and imagination, but realised only in the world of conversational…

Abstract

Denzin has noted that the interview is a ‘conversational production, anticipated in the investigator's mind and imagination, but realised only in the world of conversational interaction’ (1970:188). This article aims to examine the processes involved in the production of a sociological interview especially, although not exclusively, at the level of conversational interaction. By focussing attention on to one specific piece of empirical work,(1) I hope to provide a balance to other more general appraisals of the interview method (eg. Richardson, 1965; Denzin, 1970; Brenner, 1978). The article attempts to further our understanding of the contextual production of sociological data.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1982

Liz Chapman, Elizabeth Baker, Peter H Mann, WA Munford and AGK Leonard

‘WHAT A novel arrangement. Is any reason given?’

Abstract

‘WHAT A novel arrangement. Is any reason given?’

Details

New Library World, vol. 83 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Sandra A. Rogers and Gurupreet K. Khalsa

The syllabus serves as a plan that can be utilized for discussing course (re)design. The Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric© (OCOISR) was developed for collaborators to…

Abstract

The syllabus serves as a plan that can be utilized for discussing course (re)design. The Online Community of Inquiry Syllabus Rubric© (OCOISR) was developed for collaborators to review online course plans for continuous improvement. It assesses the potential to engender cognitive presence (CP), social presence (SP), teaching presence (TP), and learner support (LS) in online college courses based on interactive treatments. In one case study, two raters with advanced degrees in instructional design and online teaching experience reviewed 31 online syllabi across disciplines to determine their potential for producing an online community of inquiry. They achieved a good degree of consistency among measurements, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.821, p < 0.001, and 95% CI [0.40, 0.932]. Raters found above-average CP, moderate SP, and basic TP. These results mirrored that of the previous case study at a different institution. Other findings included basic educational technology use in both cases. The lead author, serving as the college’s instructional designer, provided course-specific recommendations to instructors based on their syllabi review for action research. This chapter describes the use of the OCOISR© to maximize student–student, student–teacher, and student–content planned engagement for improved online learning experiences.

Abstract

Many jurisdictions fine illegal cartels using penalty guidelines that presume an arbitrary 10% overcharge. This article surveys more than 700 published economic studies and judicial decisions that contain 2,041 quantitative estimates of overcharges of hard-core cartels. The primary findings are: (1) the median average long-run overcharge for all types of cartels over all time periods is 23.0%; (2) the mean average is at least 49%; (3) overcharges reached their zenith in 1891–1945 and have trended downward ever since; (4) 6% of the cartel episodes are zero; (5) median overcharges of international-membership cartels are 38% higher than those of domestic cartels; (6) convicted cartels are on average 19% more effective at raising prices as unpunished cartels; (7) bid-rigging conduct displays 25% lower markups than price-fixing cartels; (8) contemporary cartels targeted by class actions have higher overcharges; and (9) when cartels operate at peak effectiveness, price changes are 60–80% higher than the whole episode. Historical penalty guidelines aimed at optimally deterring cartels are likely to be too low.

Details

The Law and Economics of Class Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-951-5

Keywords

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