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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Daniel B. Le Roux and Douglas A. Parry

Online vigilance is a novel construct which describes individual differences in users' cognitive orientation to online connectedness, their attention to and integration of…

Abstract

Purpose

Online vigilance is a novel construct which describes individual differences in users' cognitive orientation to online connectedness, their attention to and integration of online-related cues and stimuli and their prioritisation of online communication. Its proponents argue that it is acquired through the processes of instrumental and attentional training that underlie media use behaviours. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the role of three personal characteristics (emotional intelligence, rumination and identity distress) as predictors of online vigilance in addition to media use behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an exploratory frame and followed a survey-methodology to collect data among a sample of university students (n = 812). The resulting data were analysed through a hierarchical multiple regression process in which four models were considered.

Findings

The findings indicate that while media use behaviours (daily smartphone use, social media use, messaging, video watching and media multitasking) predict online vigilance, their combined effect is weak. However, when considering these behaviours in combination with trait rumination and identity distress, a moderate effect is observable.

Research limitations/implications

While the findings do not permit causal inference, it suggests that two personal characteristics, trait rumination and identity distress, play an important role in determining an individual's tendency or ability to psychologically disconnect from their online spheres. This provides an initial step towards the theorisation of online vigilance and the identification of individuals who may be at risk of acquiring it.

Originality/value

Online vigilance is a novel construct which has only been investigated in a small number of studies. However, its emphasis on psychological connectedness presents a unique and important development in the context of permanently online, permanently connected living. The present study is the first to explore its association with personal characteristics.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2016

Karin Klenke

Abstract

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Qualitative Research in the Study of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-651-9

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Kristina Hinds

This chapter discusses the Government of Barbados’s 2014 introduction of partially student paid tuition fees for Barbadians attending the University of the West Indies…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the Government of Barbados’s 2014 introduction of partially student paid tuition fees for Barbadians attending the University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill Campus. This introduction of a student paid tuition component came after fifty years of state-funded education at the local UWI campus. In this chapter I assert that this introduction of fees altered the existing postcolonial “social contract” that has developed in the country and that has been integral to Barbados being presented as a “model” for small developing states in the Caribbean and beyond. In the chapter I argue that the social contract in the country was altered in light of the alleged demands of financial crisis and that this crisis climate allowed for “decision-making by surprise” in a country in which collaborative education governance has grown to be accepted as the norm.

Details

The Global Educational Policy Environment in the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-044-2

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Orsolya Sadik-Rozsnyai

Whereas the impact of national culture on consumer innovativeness is widely discussed in the innovation literature, studies are scarce on consumer value and the related…

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Abstract

Purpose

Whereas the impact of national culture on consumer innovativeness is widely discussed in the innovation literature, studies are scarce on consumer value and the related consumer willingness to pay (WTP) for innovations. Yet, innovative high-tech companies compete by enhancing their products with new attributes, and assessing consumer WTP for these innovative attributes in different countries is crucial to adapting the launching price and optimizing profits during the critical launch stage. To fill this gap, the purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of national culture and globalization on consumer value and the related WTP for technological innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two culturally distinct but economically similar countries (France and Germany), using large representative and comparable consumer samples (n=642). Choice-based conjoint analysis was used as the principal method of data analysis.

Findings

This study reveals the significant impact of national culture on consumer value and the related WTP for technological innovations and the moderating effect of household income on this relationship.

Originality/value

This study is the first to reveal and provide strong empirical evidence of the impact of national culture on WTP for innovations. In addition, this study is the first to reveal the moderating effect of income on this relationship and to highlight an emerging European innovation adoption behavior.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

V.T.H. Parry

The University of London's far‐reaching plan for a new generation of library automation has become a casualty of the UGC's latest round of cuts in funding for…

Abstract

The University of London's far‐reaching plan for a new generation of library automation has become a casualty of the UGC's latest round of cuts in funding for universities. A strategy had been developed over recent years to replace the four existing shared systems and to introduce a five to seven year phase of expansion. The integration of all library functions, the provision of online access, and emphasis on resource sharing and a rational approach to library provision in London for the remainder of the century were the main objectives. A distributed network was planned to link all the diverse libraries of the University in a common system, affording online access to shared bibliographic and, where appropriate, shared borrower data. Considerable interest in the scheme was being shown by libraries both at home and abroad.

Details

VINE, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1943

This is the first comprehensive study that has appeared on consumption and rationing in the present war. All types of rationing and the experience of a very large number…

Abstract

This is the first comprehensive study that has appeared on consumption and rationing in the present war. All types of rationing and the experience of a very large number of countries are brought under review, on the basis of material collected by the Economic Intelligence Service of the League of Nations. Rationing and other measures of consumption control are enforced in order to ensure an equitable distribution of limited—and in many countries drastically curtailed—supplies of certain essential goods, such as foodstuffs, clothing and fuel. But they play a further very vital role in war economy, by reducing (or limiting) civilian demand in order to liberate maximum resources for war purposes and by making possible the control of prices. The volume opens with a discussion of this broad problem of consumption control in war economy, the various methods of rationing, the conditions under which they can operate successfully and the connection between rationing and price control. Particular attention is naturally devoted to food. In the second chapter tables are given showing, for some thirty countries, by categories of consumers and groups of foodstuffs, rations prevailing in the spring of 1942. As regards Europe, available evidence seems to show that diets are adequate in the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland, and not critically short in calories (though apparently deficient in animal proteins, fats, minerals and certain vitamins) in Germany, despite the substantial cut in the German rations which occurred in April, 1942. The situation in Italy and Spain is decidedly worse than in Germany. This is also true of the occupied countries, except Denmark. Not only are the legal rations lower, but those rations are frequently unobtainable in the shops; and even if obtainable, it is often doubtful whether full rations can be purchased by the poorest classes, prices having risen out of all proportion to the frozen wage‐rates. Diets in the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Norway are nutritionally poorer and more deficient in calories than in Germany. In France and Belgium, where the rations represent about 60 per cent. of the pre‐war calorie consumption, many of those who are unable to eke out their rations by purchases on the “ black market ” are living at the barest level of subsistence. In Finland the rations represent about 55 per cent., in Poland (General‐Government) less than 50 per cent. of the pre‐war calorie consumption. In the latter country, in parts of Yugoslavia, and above all in Greece, there is famine. To meet differences in individual needs, two distinct systems have been evolved. In Germany, where about 90 per cent. of food consumption is rationed, rations are differentiated according to kinds of foods and classes of consumers—the latter being divided into categories by occupations (heavy worker, very heavy worker, light worker) and by sex, age, etc. The rations of bread, fat and meat of “ very heavy workers,” for example, are between two and three times as large as those of normal consumers. The German system, which has been generally applied in the occupied countries, is rigid and leaves a minimum of free consumers' choice. The British system is far more flexible. Bread and potatoes are free, thus permitting everyone to obtain an unlimited number of calories, while restaurant and canteen meals are supplementary to the individual's basic ration. Special needs are met by the allocation of extra rations to canteens catering to industrial workers, by the extension of free school meals, and by “ distribution schemes ” giving children, mothers and sick people first claim on available supplies of protective foods such as milk and fruit‐juice. Flexibility is also maintained by the group rationing of canned goods. According to this system each item within the group is valued in points and the consumer may buy whatever he desires up to a given total point value. It is considered of great importance that all, irrespective of income, should be able to obtain their quota of essential foods. Among the measures introduced for this purpose are the far‐reaching subsidies to keep down prices. Many aspects of the British system are naturally to be found elsewhere: for example, the subsidisation of staple foods is practised in Sweden and certain other European countries; Germany distributes free vitamin preparations to school children; canteen and school feeding is common in Germany and many of the occupied areas, though for these meals ration cards have, as a rule, to be given up. In the case of food, there are definite limits to the amount by which consumption can be reduced without endangering health and life; in the case of most, though not all, consumers' goods, there are no such obvious limits and, in fact, the consumption of such goods has been drastically curtailed. Available information on the subject is given in the third chapter. The group rationing system just mentioned has been universally applied in the case of clothing. But in Germany, most of the occupied areas and Italy, rationing lias been supplemented by a system of special permits, without which no purchase of certain articles of clothing can be made. By the first half of 1941, purchases of clothing in Germany had been reduced by some 50 per cent. from the pre‐war level. The clothes rationing introduced in the United Kingdom in June, 1941, led to a decrease of about 30 per cent. in the volume of sales in the second half of that year compared with the same period of 1940. Fuel, electric current, soap, and other articles of household consumption are subject to restrictions of varying degrees of severity; the production of luxury goods has been restricted or stopped, while such limited quantities as may reach the market are subject to drastically increased taxation; the production of most durable consumers' goods— refrigerators, household furniture, pianos, etc.—has likewise been stopped. The last chapter contains a brief analysis of the effects which war‐time restrictions have had on the aggregate volume of consumption in various countries. Consumption has been heavily reduced in all European countries and in Japan; in the United States, Canada, Australia and certain other countries it appears to have increased up to the latter part of 1941. In the United Kingdom the reduction in consumption provided about one‐third of the total domestic resources absorbed in the war effort in 1941. The requirements of war production have also been met to a considerable extent by the consumption of capital. Germany, in particular, has had to resort to capital consumption on a large scale, in spite of a curtailment of private consumption by some 25 to 30 per cent. In reviewing the whole body of evidence, especially concerning food rationing, it is observed that the rationing systems which have been developed are “ more than a mere method of restricting individual consumption. They aim in fact at securing a minimum diet for the population as a whole and, in spite of the necessary limitations imposed by the war‐time scarcity, they contain the elements of a distributive system in which consumption is guided not so much by individual purchasing power as by human wants.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Keon Bong Lee and Veronica Wong

The purpose of this paper is to address a gap in the understanding of the indirect effects of marketing and technical factors on time efficiency in developing a new…

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3351

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a gap in the understanding of the indirect effects of marketing and technical factors on time efficiency in developing a new product and international new product launch.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a contingency perspective in examining the relationships between antecedents and on‐time completion (or timeliness) of new product development (NPD) and international new product rollout (INPR). A conceptual framework is tested based on data obtained on 232 NPD projects undertaken by Korean firms.

Findings

The results show that NPD proficiencies mediate to a greater or lesser extent the effects of key antecedents (e.g. cross‐functional linkages, project fit with available marketing resources, and effective coordination of headquarters‐subsidiary/agents' activities) on timeliness in NPD and INPR.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical research on the role of marketing and technical proficiencies in improving NPD timeliness and rollout timeliness in the context of international NPD affirms the importance of adopting a contingency perspective in examining the antecedents of NPD and multi‐market entry timeliness.

Practical implications

This paper lends insight into the role of overseas subsidiaries or agents in helping to build the technical proficiencies of emerging country companies.

Originality/value

This is the first review focusing on the mediating influences on time dimensions (e.g. timeliness) in multi‐country product launches.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

William Hunter and Douglas Renwick

The paper seeks to detail the formal and informal aspects of involving line managers in human resource management (HRM).

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3284

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to detail the formal and informal aspects of involving line managers in human resource management (HRM).

Design/method/approach

The investigation was conducted by interviewing line managers at one work organisation.

Findings

Formally, line managers state that they accept their HR roles, are competent in HRM, and have time/support to do it effectively, but informally do not place much reliance on written HR policies, revealing a degree of “loose coupling” between the formal/informal elements of their involvement in HRM.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could ascertain if the findings herein on the formal and informal development of managers by their seniors and peers in HRM are common to other work organisations. Limitations are that this is a single case relying on qualitative data, meaning issues of generalisability of findings arise.

Practical implications

It may be of benefit to discover to what extent the informal internal networks line managers use to make decisions in HRM occur in other work organisations.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the existing knowledge by providing empirical data on the formal and informal aspects of involving line managers in HRM in an under‐researched context (a small British non‐profit organisation without a HR function), which adds to the literature on actual line management practices in HRM.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1969

A question of size THE Committee set up by the Minister of Education in 1957 to “consider the structure of the public library service in England and Wales, and to advise…

Abstract

A question of size THE Committee set up by the Minister of Education in 1957 to “consider the structure of the public library service in England and Wales, and to advise what changes, if any, should be made n the administrative arrangements, regard being had to the relation of public libraries to other libraries,” was the first such since the Kenyon Committee which reported in 1927. One of the most controversial aspects of the Roberts Committee's deliberations was the consideration of the minimum size (in terms of population) of an independent library system.

Details

New Library World, vol. 71 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Frank Alpert, Michael Kamins, Tomoaki Sakano, Naoto Onzo and John Graham

One potential source of pioneer brand advantage is retail buyers’ preference for pioneer brands. A model of pioneer brand advantage with retailers developed in the USA was…

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5129

Abstract

One potential source of pioneer brand advantage is retail buyers’ preference for pioneer brands. A model of pioneer brand advantage with retailers developed in the USA was tested in Japan, as a replication and cross‐cultural extension. This provides the first empirical study of Japanese retail buyer beliefs, attitude, and behavior toward new offerings, and the first direct statistical comparison of US and Japanese retail buying behavior in the marketing literature. Similarities and differences in pioneer brand advantage with retailers between Japan and the USA are discussed. Results from a survey of buyers from Japan’s largest supermarket chains suggest that pioneer brand advantage is about as strong for them as for their US counterparts, though for somewhat different reasons. The survey’s results were analyzed in two ways (through a multi‐attribute attitude model and a PLS causal model), with results that complement and corroborate one another. Data were standardized to deal with potential extreme response style bias.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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