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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

William Roth and Doug Ferguson

The use of quality improvement processes can yield major benefits to an organisation. This article looks at why some companies are failing to capitalise on this technique…

Abstract

The use of quality improvement processes can yield major benefits to an organisation. This article looks at why some companies are failing to capitalise on this technique and suggests a phased‐approach to getting it right.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Kate Manuel

Academic librarians have been creating Web‐based tutorials in support of their institutions’ distance education course and remote students for some time. For‐credit…

Abstract

Academic librarians have been creating Web‐based tutorials in support of their institutions’ distance education course and remote students for some time. For‐credit, distance education, information literacy classes for undergraduate students, however, have not yet begun to appear in significant numbers. In creating such a course, LIBY 3200, California State University, Hayward, sought to meet the needs of its students better and to explore the potential of distance education. Findings from experience teaching LIBY 3200 suggest that many students are less prepared to function – technologically and cognitively – in a Web‐based distance education environment than might be predicted. Design and delivery of course content proved time‐consuming, with few possibilities for short‐cuts, and teaching methods had to be adapted to help the students become autonomous learners, meaningfully capable of self‐directed learning in a Web‐based environment.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Lena Yuryna Connolly, Michael Lang, John Gathegi and Doug J. Tygar

This paper provides new insights about security behaviour in selected US and Irish organisations by investigating how organisational culture and procedural security…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides new insights about security behaviour in selected US and Irish organisations by investigating how organisational culture and procedural security countermeasures tend to influence employee security actions. An increasing number of information security breaches in organisations presents a serious threat to the confidentiality of personal and commercially sensitive data. While recent research shows that humans are the weakest link in the security chain and the root cause of a great portion of security breaches, the extant security literature tends to focus on technical issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on general deterrence theory and prior organisational culture literature. The methodology adapted for this study draws on the analytical grounded theory approach employing a constant comparative method.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that procedural security countermeasures and organisational culture tend to affect security behaviour in organisational settings.

Research limitations/implications

This paper fills the void in information security research and takes its place among the very few studies that focus on behavioural as opposed to technical issues.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the important role of procedural security countermeasures, information security awareness and organisational culture in managing illicit behaviour of employees.

Originality/value

This study extends general deterrence theory in a novel way by including information security awareness in the research model and by investigating both negative and positive behaviours.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Terry Simister

In this article Terry Simister explains the background behind the initiative led by the Institute of Risk Management to establish recognised British and International…

Abstract

In this article Terry Simister explains the background behind the initiative led by the Institute of Risk Management to establish recognised British and International standards for the practice of risk management. He discusses the historical development of the concept of risk management and how that led to recognition of the need to create a profession to deal with all its aspects. He analyses the difficulties in providing a comprehensive definition of risk management and the difficulties there have been in reaching agreement in the international arena. He concludes with an overview of the forces which make an agreed standard a necessity.

Details

Balance Sheet, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-7967

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Including a Symposium on Mary Morgan: Curiosity, Imagination, and Surprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-423-7

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Rick Ferguson and Bill Brohaugh

The purpose of this paper is to remind loyalty marketers to harness the power of the often‐forgotten generation that truly values brand loyalty – the Baby boomers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to remind loyalty marketers to harness the power of the often‐forgotten generation that truly values brand loyalty – the Baby boomers.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach take the form of exploring Boomers' demographics and influence on the marketing community and outlining some of the best practices to which marketers can look when building programs and offers for Boomers.

Findings

By 2010, one‐third of the US population will be over 50; by 2020, one in five Americans will be over 65. In the near future, the oldest segment of the US economy will control the largest share of the US economy and marketers will be wise to make 50+ consumers visible in their marketing strategies. Boomers will find the brands that resonate with them and continue to fuel revenue and growth for years to come.

Practical implications

If one has established a relationship with Boomer customers and one has maintained the integrity of those relationships, they will stay with one for years to come. The biggest mistake one can make is to change one's offers and messaging to them just because they hit retirement age.

Originality/value

The paper presents exclusive interviews with representatives from some of the largest marketing firms in the industry today. Tangible tips and tools to utilize in the real world marketing plans are offered.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2010

Michaela DeSoucey and David Schleifer

This chapter addresses how small businesses resist city regulations by using material things, by making craft knowledge claims about material things, and by letting…

Abstract

This chapter addresses how small businesses resist city regulations by using material things, by making craft knowledge claims about material things, and by letting material things organize their political activity. Chefs successfully resisted a foie gras ban in Chicago, where political resistance shaped the production and use of material things. Bakers successfully resisted a trans fat ban in Philadelphia, where material properties of things structured political resistance. We bring together analytic tools from the sociology of culture and science and technology studies to demonstrate how materiality can be both an instigator and an instrument of legal and political resistance.

Details

Special Issue Interdisciplinary Legal Studies: The Next Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-751-6

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Christopher Kirchgasler

The coming of Big Data is offered as a salve that will reduce global inequalities and grow national economies. The chapter pursues how notions of progress have traveled…

Abstract

The coming of Big Data is offered as a salve that will reduce global inequalities and grow national economies. The chapter pursues how notions of progress have traveled into schooling through technology and generate differences and exclusions in the past and present. The chapter explores how transnational school reforms during the colonial era were directed to adapting education to “the African,” which connected expertise in the U.S., UK, and Africa through a shared set of standards, principles, and values about what constituted civilization and development. In school reforms today, the “African” has disappeared today in favor of the “all”; however, residues of educational values and judgments that made up the African as a peculiar and pathological target of colonial schooling still haunt the present. The chapter argues that today’s transnational school reforms continue to presume target communities are passive, pathological objects whose transformation depends upon their learning to act rationally. Whereas in the past this was envisioned as individuals’ and communities’ assimilation through surveys and questionnaires, today rationality is managed through integration in systems and optimizing users’ choices through data mining and algorithms. The narrative of data as grounding rational thought and action is a seductive one that offers optimism to schooling; however, faith in the coming of technology impairs historical reflection and ethical reflexivity toward schooling’s values and judgments, and the differences and exclusions they generate.

Details

The Educational Intelligent Economy: Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and the Internet of Things in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-853-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Ronald Burt De Waal

This is a comprehensive list of books, some pamphlets, and a few sound recordings about or by Ronald (and Nancy) Reagan. Collections of photographs and cartoons as well as…

Abstract

This is a comprehensive list of books, some pamphlets, and a few sound recordings about or by Ronald (and Nancy) Reagan. Collections of photographs and cartoons as well as biographies, political commentary, speeches, quotations and even recipes are represented. Omitted are books in which there is only brief mention of him. The bibliography was compiled in connection with a major exhibit on Ronald Reagan at the Colorado State University Library. It is the author's intention to continue to collect Reagan materials.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Marie Gagné

In Senegal, the government has encouraged private investment in agriculture and biofuel production since the 2000s, generating several attempted or effective large-scale…

Abstract

In Senegal, the government has encouraged private investment in agriculture and biofuel production since the 2000s, generating several attempted or effective large-scale land acquisitions by domestic and international investors. In reaction to these projects, local groups of opponents have joined forces with national peasant organizations, civil society associations, and think tanks to resist perceived land grabs. This article examines the emergence of this social movement and explains why anti-land grabs campaigns were successful in halting some projects, but not successful in others. I argue that four main factors are at play: a strong mobilization of local populations measured by group cohesion and level of determination; the assistance of national and international NGOs in scaling up protests beyond the local level; the capacity of opponents to harness the support of influential elites and decision-makers; and the legal status of the land under contention. This paper draws on an analysis of secondary data, qualitative interviews, and field observations carried out in Senegal for several months from 2013 to 2018.

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