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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Doreen M. Miller

People are a company′s most valuable resource. Protection of thisinvestment is, therefore, very important. In today′s business world,never before has so much attention…

Abstract

People are a company′s most valuable resource. Protection of this investment is, therefore, very important. In today′s business world, never before has so much attention been paid to the health and safety of people at work. Explains the part played in this by occupational health management. Defines occupational health and outlines the ways in which occupational health services can help to improve productivity. Identifies the elements that need to be included in an occupational health plan.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1984

These days buildings have to stand up and justify themselves. They have to be carefully organised and controlled—made to function as separate entities, intelligent and…

Abstract

These days buildings have to stand up and justify themselves. They have to be carefully organised and controlled—made to function as separate entities, intelligent and cost‐effective. In last month's Analysis on materials handling, the organic image was clearly established, presenting the building as an entity, with cycles of decline and regeneration. Keeping buildings healthy and alive entails setting up the right systems and procedures: keeping the right records: planning and controlling maintenance: and knowing when and what to replace.

Details

Facilities, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Kathleen A. Simons and Tracey J. Riley

Accounting practitioners and educators agree that effective oral and written communication skills are essential to success in the accounting profession. Despite numerous…

Abstract

Accounting practitioners and educators agree that effective oral and written communication skills are essential to success in the accounting profession. Despite numerous initiatives to improve accounting majors’ communication skills, many students remain deficient in this area. Communication literature suggests that one factor rendering these initiatives ineffective is communication apprehension (CA). There is general agreement that accounting students around the globe have higher levels of CA than other majors. Therefore, accounting educators interested in improving students’ communication skills need to be aware of the dimensions and implications of CA. This chapter provides a review of the relevant literature on CA, with a focus on CA in accounting majors. It also presents intervention techniques for use in the classroom and makes suggestions for future research.

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Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-851-8

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2021

Shogo Kudo, Kanako Omi, Kevin Florentin and Doreen Ingosan Allasiw

This paper aims to describe how a sustainability-focused program in higher education can provide training and key experiences for implementing transdisciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how a sustainability-focused program in higher education can provide training and key experiences for implementing transdisciplinary approaches. The case is a fieldwork-based training course called the Global Field Exercise (GFE) at the Graduate Program in Sustainability Science, The University of Tokyo. The GFE is a methodological training course that emphasizes generating locally relevant research questions on sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a case study regarding how a sustainability science program can offer a fieldwork-based training course that focuses on a transdisciplinary approach. Five students from diverse academic disciplines and cultural backgrounds participated in the GFE in QwaQwa where they conducted semi-structured interviews with six local entrepreneurs to identify the challenges and opportunities of entrepreneurship. The authors investigated the learning process and outcomes of the students through participatory observation in preparatory meetings, daily reflection sessions during fieldwork and a content analysis of feedback reports.

Findings

Four learning outcomes of the students were suggested: the reexamination of assumptions, managing misunderstanding and miscommunication, mutual learning and being empathic toward the local people.

Research limitations/implications

This paper suggests three key opportunistic experiences for the transdisciplinary approach: discuss the normative dimension of sustainability; build intersubjectivity among team members and adopt methodological pluralism; and become empathetic to diverse stakeholder groups to facilitate the cogeneration of knowledge.

Originality/value

How to design training on a transdisciplinary approach in educational programs remains an area for further exploration. This study addresses this knowledge gap by establishing a link between sustainability education and sustainability in practice.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Helen Woodruffe‐Burton and Susan Wakenshaw

The research presented in this article aims to extend our understanding of the symbolic and experiential values of shopping through the investigation of consumers' grocery…

Abstract

Purpose

The research presented in this article aims to extend our understanding of the symbolic and experiential values of shopping through the investigation of consumers' grocery shopping and consumption experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach was based on the existential phenomenological interview; ten women living in the UK who were in paid employment outside the home at the time of the study, who were married (or living with their partner) and who had at least one child living at home participated in the study which explored their lived experiences of grocery shopping and consumption.

Findings

The findings reveal that consumers can construct various dimensions and levels of self/identity through their food shopping and consumption practices through their shopping experiences and in conjunction with various resources and support provided by retailers. Four key themes are identified and explored: “I am in control”; “I am me”; “I share and I love”; and “I belong”.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is exploratory in nature; it identifies four key themes which appear significant and provides a starting point for further research.

Originality/value

This paper explores the ways in which shopping confirms consumers' personal identity, social position and social identity and contributes to the literature in two ways: the research extends our understanding of the experiential values of shopping by extending the domain of enquiry from consumers' experiences in‐store to the actual consumption phase and consumers' self identity is investigated through the exploration of individual consumers' lived shopping and consumption experiences from an holistic perspective.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Case study
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Stephen M. Rapier, Doreen E. Shanahan, Nancy E. Dodd and Jeffrey R. Baker

In the 1990s, Mike Flanagan foresaw video moving from analog to digital and developed an equipment rental business to meet the needs of the entertainment/media production…

Abstract

Synopsis

In the 1990s, Mike Flanagan foresaw video moving from analog to digital and developed an equipment rental business to meet the needs of the entertainment/media production industry. By 1996 he established a second company to offer training in the use of Avid, a digital video-editing program. Flanagan sold the rental business in 1998 and by 2002 expanded the training away from a business model to a full-fledged college business model. By 2014 what started as a successful training program developed into a negative interaction with the US Department of Education and Flanagan found himself being forced out of business.

Research methodology

This case was originally a client-based project conducted real time in an MBA-level marketing course at the Graziadio School of Business and Management at Pepperdine University.

Relevant courses and levels

The case is well suited for a variety of business and law courses that integrate ethical decision making in their curriculum at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The case allows for a greater understanding of the implications of managerial behavior tied to ethical beliefs and the possible outcomes that may result. It also allows for a stronger grasp of the integral nature of management, staff, consumers and outside organizations on the pervasive impact of non-ethical behavior. Last, this case creates a framework for students to assess how ethics influence managerial behavior that will affect an organization’s success.

Theoretical bases

What ethical duties and obligations does a business owe to its customers and other stakeholders? Is ignorance an excuse for failing to meet those ethical obligations?

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Abstract

Details

The Role of External Examining in Higher Education: Challenges and Best Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-174-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Kathleen W. Craver

In the 1970s, the United States Congress enacted two statutes that have had dramatic and far‐reaching effects on the education of handicapped children by public schools…

Abstract

In the 1970s, the United States Congress enacted two statutes that have had dramatic and far‐reaching effects on the education of handicapped children by public schools. These two laws, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Education For All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (known as Public Law 94–142), have required local public school agencies to provide new eductional programs for thousands of handicapped children not previously served by the public schools. Counselors, principals, and teachers were quickly informed of the law's requirements and willingly began the task of main‐streaming and assimilating these children into various curricula. Their physical needs were attended to rapidly; their societal and emotional needs, unfortunately, lagged behind. Within the past seven years, there has been an increase in books, articles, and films specifically addressed to counseling the handicapped. Unlike past literature which focused only on the vocational aspect of rehabilitation counseling, current writing emphasizes personal counseling meant to assist a disabled child to participate fully in the problems and joys of daily living.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

KayLaura Miller and Janie Hubbard

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr is a timeless book well-known among K-6 teachers, students, librarians and book-lovers throughout the USA. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr is a timeless book well-known among K-6 teachers, students, librarians and book-lovers throughout the USA. This multi-award winning picture book provides readers with insight into Dr Martin Luther King Jr’s life and the oppression and progress of African Americans before and during an era known as the modern US Civil Rights Movement (CRM). The biography outlines the period’s equity issues, and serves as a springboard for this upper elementary lesson. While Dr King played an iconic role, there were many other individuals involved in the CRM, most of whom students do not know. The purpose of this paper is to offer varying perspectives related to lesser known CRM leaders, protesters, advocates, perpetrators and bystanders.

Design/methodology/approach

Technology is incorporated through online research, videos and productions; thus, students actively engage in making connections to various individuals’ points of view, those both supportive and oppositional. Students conduct research while responding to higher-order, critical-thinking questions regarding groups and forces of the CRM. Then, they expand knowledge through jigsaw research activities by collecting information, responding to inquiry questions and presenting relevant evidence-based information about CRM contributors, perpetrators and bystanders.

Findings

This is a National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Notable Tradebook Lesson Plan.

Originality/value

This is a NCSS Notable Tradebook Lesson Plan.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Suzanne Miller Hosley, Agnes T.W. Lau, Ferdinand K. Levy and Doreen S.K. Tan

In a rapidly changing and unpredictable business environment, a majorsource of sustainable competitive advantage is likely to be the abilityto learn faster than…

Abstract

In a rapidly changing and unpredictable business environment, a major source of sustainable competitive advantage is likely to be the ability to learn faster than competitors. Reviews the literature on strategic change and competition and explores their relationship to organizational learning. Develops a conceptual framework for a competitive learning organization. The proposed model promotes learning at different organizational levels and a learning focus which encompasses the need to understand the dynamics of competitive forces, the satisfaction of changing customer needs and the importance of systems thinking. In their quest to achieve competitive learning, organizations are likely to go through static and teaching phases.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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