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1 – 10 of 54

Abstract

Purpose

To ensure that more people will benefit from integrated care initiatives, scaling-up of successful initiatives is the way forward. However, new challenges present themselves as knowledge on how to achieve successful large-scale implementation is scarce. The EU-funded project SCIROCCO uses a step-based scaling-up strategy to explore what to scale-up, and how to scale-up integrated care initiatives by matching the complementary strengths and weaknesses of five European regions involved in integrated care. The purpose of this paper is to describe a multi-method evaluation protocol designed to understand what factors influence the implementation of the SCIROCCO strategy to support the scaling-up of integrated care.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of the protocol focuses on the assessment of the implementation fidelity of the SCIROCCO step-based strategy. The objective is to gain insight in whether the step-based strategy is implemented as it was designed to explore what works and does not work when implementing the scaling-up strategy. The second part concerns a realist evaluation to examine what it is about the SCIROCCO’s strategy that works for whom, why, how and in which circumstances when scaling-up integrated care.

Findings

The intended study will provide valuable information on the implementation of the scaling-up strategy which will help to explain for what specific reasons the implementation succeeds and will facilitate further improvement of project outcomes.

Originality/value

The expected insights could be useful to guide the development, implementation and evaluation of future scaling-up strategies to advance the change towards more sustainable health and care systems.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Erastus Karanja, Donna Grant and Jigish S. Zaveri

Grounded in the principal-agent theory, this study aims to develop and test hypotheses too, investigate how the firm’s strategic orientations, namely, innovation, growth…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded in the principal-agent theory, this study aims to develop and test hypotheses too, investigate how the firm’s strategic orientations, namely, innovation, growth, differentiation and cost leadership impact the chief information officer (CIO) reporting relationship and structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses content analysis to analyze a data set of press releases collected from the LexisNexis Academic wire index. The press releases were issued by firms when they hired CIOs between 2003 and 2007, yielding 128 firms, which had specific information about the CIO reporting relationship and structure.

Findings

The results reveal that firms seeking an innovation, growth or differentiation strategy have their CIOs reporting to the chief executive officer.

Research limitations/implications

The current study is motivated by the desire to replicate and extend the works of previous researchers who have assessed various CIO issues. Replication takes several forms such as the use of similar or different data sets, different research environments or reinvestigating research concepts through a different theoretical lens. This study makes use of a multi-firm data set spanning five years and the principal-agent theory as the theoretical framework to explore the CIO reporting relationship and structure. Although this study focuses on the hiring trends and the strategic orientations of the firms, future studies should explore other characteristics associated with the CIOs that might have an impact on the reporting relationship such as the years of experience, age, educational background of CIOs and information technology budgets.

Practical implications

The existing literature has not settled the debate as to whom the CIO should be reporting to and understanding the reporting relationships is important because, in many firms, the organizational structures and the reporting relationships are indicative of the power dynamics and how the organizational resources are controlled and shared.

Originality/value

Replication studies are important because they confirm, reinforce, extend and provide reliability to the paradigms and knowledge in the discipline, as well as offer reliability of the results upon which scientific progress is based.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Grace Zeng, Donna Chung and Beverley McNamara

Over the past decade, the push for recovery-oriented services has birthed a growth in the recruitment of peer providers in mental health services: Persons who live with…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past decade, the push for recovery-oriented services has birthed a growth in the recruitment of peer providers in mental health services: Persons who live with and manage their mental health challenges and are employed to support persons currently using mental health services. The aim of this paper is to compare the responses of government and non-government organisations to the implementation of peer provision.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a qualitative study design, 15 people who supervised peer providers or who were strategically involved in peer provision were recruited using snowball sampling. Participants completed an in-depth interview that explored how peer provision services operated at their organisation and factors that shaped the way peer provision operates. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using Moore's Strategic Triangle. Synthesised member checking and researcher triangulation ensued to establish trustworthiness.

Findings

The way in which peer provision operated sat along a continuum ranging from adoption (where practices are shaped by the recovery ethos) to co-option (where recovery work may be undertaken, but not shaped by the recovery ethos). Political and legal mandates that affected the operational capacities of each organisation shaped the way peer provision services operated.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study highlight the need to reconsider where peer provision services fit in the mental health system. Research investigating the value of peer provision services may attract the support of funders, service users and policy makers alike.

Originality/value

In employing Moore's strategic triangle to evaluate the alignment of policy (the authorising environment) with the operational capacity and practice of peer provision services (the task environment), this study found that organisational response to peer provision is largely influenced by political and legal mandates externally. The successful implementation of peer provision is mediated by effective supervision of peer providers.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Ginni Voedisch

Reports on a conference held in 1989 in Wisconsin, which focused onthe topic of providing better access to information for people withdisabilities. According to the…

Abstract

Reports on a conference held in 1989 in Wisconsin, which focused on the topic of providing better access to information for people with disabilities. According to the author, the conference concentrated mainly on those with vision‐related difficulties. Summarizes two of the speeches made at the conference and examines some of the technology on display. Stresses the need for adaptive technology to enable people with a disability to access the increasing amounts of computer technology in everyday life.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Grace Zeng and Donna Chung

In recent years, the employment of peer providers (PPs) has grown with the wider acceptance of lived experience expertise in recovery-oriented service provision. Although…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, the employment of peer providers (PPs) has grown with the wider acceptance of lived experience expertise in recovery-oriented service provision. Although its effectiveness, theoretical foundations and factors influencing outcomes have been studied, a framework accounting for the dynamics of the PP–peer relationship has yet to be formulated. The purpose of this paper is to employ a qualitative approach to explore the journeys undertaken by PPs with their peers and form it into a cohesive framework of understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with PPs who were employed specifically to use their lived experience in supporting someone through mental distress. These interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded using a framework approach. To enhance rigour, this framework was verified with the latter author and three other participants recruited after data analysis.

Findings

A stepped model of peer provision practice was crafted to capture the non-linearity of recovery, as well as the PP–peer relationship. This model is founded upon trust in the milieu of shared experience and involves: creating a safe place – a stage of building trust and rapport to a point where a PP is given permission to enter into their peer’s headspace; a working partnership – stage of setting and working towards goals collaboratively; and stepping out – a stage marked by the termination of the PP–peer relationship.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a tangible framework underpinning the dynamics of peer provision practice, which furthers our understanding and complements current practice models in peer provision services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Morris B. Holbrook and Ellen Day

Based on an analogy with a recently revived film of The Benny GoodmanStory, draws some marketing‐related parallels between jazz musicianshipand teaching. Specifically, as…

Abstract

Based on an analogy with a recently revived film of The Benny Goodman Story, draws some marketing‐related parallels between jazz musicianship and teaching. Specifically, as in the case of artists, professors may often pursue a product‐oriented strategy stubbornly dedicated to honouring their own convictions at the expense of a customer‐oriented quest for greater potential popularity. Illustrates through an interview with Woody Herman that, as with jazz musicians, so with teachers: one hopes that integrity will win true listeners.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Abstract

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Lorraine Anne Loveland-Armour

The purpose of this paper is to capture students’ understandings of dyslexia as a component of identity. Specifically, the journey that students embarked on in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to capture students’ understandings of dyslexia as a component of identity. Specifically, the journey that students embarked on in order to contribute to self-understanding of learning and how dyslexia contributes to these experiences was examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study explored concepts of social identity theory, how students understood their dyslexia and whether or not labelling theory informed students’ identities through an arts-based phenomenological lens. Eight university students participated in a brief survey, a semi-structured interview and created artefacts representing their dyslexia, which facilitated dialogue about their individual experiences in a higher education context.

Findings

Interpretive phenomenological analysis revealed that student participants associated strongly with the identity of dyslexia; however they did not consider themselves to be part of a dyslexic group. They also discussed different routes that informed their decisions to undergo diagnostic assessments for dyslexia. Students did not report dyslexia identity as a label. Nonetheless, the students expressed that creating an artefact supported them to better understand and communicate their dyslexia.

Originality/value

Although visual methods are increasingly prevalent in educational research, they are not typical in the field of dyslexia in higher education. This research therefore engaged students in active self-reflection which provided valuable insight into the nature and diversity of the experiences that can emerge from identification of dyslexia at university.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Marianne D. Sison

The purpose of this paper is to reconceptualize public relations roles, particularly the organizational conscience role, by examining practitioner involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reconceptualize public relations roles, particularly the organizational conscience role, by examining practitioner involvement in organizational value setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Australian communication practitioners were interviewed to ascertain practitioner involvement in organizational value setting. The interview results were subjected to a multiple perspective analysis, which was used to develop a new framework for public relations roles.

Findings

The research found that most respondents were involved in organizational value setting, albeit at the implementation stage. The results also showed the potential for practitioners to extend their involvement to a more leadership‐oriented critical inquiry role. Based on this analysis, this paper proposes three agency roles: agency of corporate compliance, agency of concertive control, and an agency of critical conscience.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample of Australian respondents and the novel approach used to analyse public relations roles require further research. The results offer new ways for practitioners to enact the conscience role through dialectical inquiry.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for embedding dialectical inquiry in public relations roles, and for integrating leadership into the technician‐manager role typology.

Originality/value

The paper examines practitioner involvement in organizational value setting through a multiple perspective lens and introduces a new public relations roles framework.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Yong-Mi Kim and Donna Newby-Bennett

Patient safety improvement through management has been a prime issue since 2000, when the Institute of Medicine reported that preventable mismanagement was responsible for…

Abstract

Patient safety improvement through management has been a prime issue since 2000, when the Institute of Medicine reported that preventable mismanagement was responsible for the majority of medical errors. Learning culture, interdisciplinary action teams, and punitive culture have been discussed as viable ways to address these errors. While these individual factors have been found to be significant, we have yet to understand the interactions of these elements. The role of leadership, which has been overlooked, is critical to facilitate or constrain these elements. The interactions of these three elements and the role of leadership were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Our finding revealed the three elements were closely knitted, and leadership roles had considerable impact in nurturing learning culture and constraining punitive culture, which in turn enhanced patient safety

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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