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1 – 10 of 26
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Donna Dickson, Igor Noveski and Hana Hamidi

The purpose of this paper is to identify critical components for service science curricula that address the unique competency needs of the service sector.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify critical components for service science curricula that address the unique competency needs of the service sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The method for this investigation included a comprehensive review, analysis, and synthesis of service science, as well as service science management and engineering (SSME) related literature. As human capital is of unique importance in this business sector, particular emphasis was placed on examining the need for human resource development‐related content in service science curricula.

Findings

Expansion of the services sector globally has been unprecedented. “Some analysts predict that by 2020, services will account for 50 percent of world trade” (Downe et al.). Yet a global shortage of graduates with the skills needed for success in service sector jobs has been forecast. Compounding this talent shortage is the relatively small number of degree programs available to prepare professionals for service sector jobs. Because the growth in the service sector has outpaced improvements in productivity, quality, and innovation, and there is a lack of skilled talent to address these challenges, increasing attention is being placed on service science curricula.

Originality/value

Given the economic importance of, and current deficiencies in, the service sector it is poised to make a significant impact by improving service science education.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Andrew J. Hobson, Linda J. Searby, Lorraine Harrison and Pam Firth

341

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Brandon Dickson, Carolyn Mussio and Donna Kotsopoulos

This study aims to explore how the theories of professional capital and decisional capital can be extended to introduce “professional mathematics capital” and “decisional…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how the theories of professional capital and decisional capital can be extended to introduce “professional mathematics capital” and “decisional mathematics capital”.

Design/methodology/approach

Professional development (PD) efforts in one school district in elementary mathematics education are described to illustrate these extensions and to contemplate ways to enhance teacher learning of mathematics pedagogy.

Findings

Both theoretical extensions provided useful frameworks for conceptualizing mathematics PD. Preliminary evidence suggests that participants demonstrated the emergence of professional and decisional mathematics capital.

Research limitations/implications

While there were observed and reported changes to teacher practice, further research is needed to explore the implications of these theoretical extensions on student learning.

Originality/value

This study serves to enhance the literature related to PD and teachers' mathematical content knowledge. The theoretical extensions of professional and decisional mathematics capital are a novel and promising concept that allows for a unique approach to be laid out for those designing PD in mathematics.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Simon Mackenzie, Annette Hübschle and Donna Yates

In this chapter, we first argue for a green criminological perspective on culture as well as nature, as those concepts are framed in the United Nations Sustainable…

Abstract

In this chapter, we first argue for a green criminological perspective on culture as well as nature, as those concepts are framed in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Second, from within this green criminological perspective we discern a neocolonial hegemony in the resource extraction from developing countries that is represented by international trafficking markets in looted cultural heritage and poached wildlife. In other words, developed nations benefit from these trades while developing nations suffer, and governance regimes attempting to control these global criminal trades prioritise the rational interests and cultural norms of the more powerful market nations over the local interests and cultural histories of communities at the source of the chain of supply. Finally, our third argument is that the emerging intellectual framework of sustainable development, as represented in the UN's goals, may provide a perspective on the issue of trafficking culture and nature that can push back against the neocolonial hegemony of international criminal markets such as these.

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Donna McAleese and Owen Hargie

This paper offers a synthesis of best practice on how to build, maintain or modify an organisation’s culture. The image of a company in which all employees strive towards…

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Abstract

This paper offers a synthesis of best practice on how to build, maintain or modify an organisation’s culture. The image of a company in which all employees strive towards common goals is now a well‐established theme of management rhetoric. Teamwork has always been considered an adorned virtue of an organisation, where staff endeavour to work collectively as one body and stick together – whatever the outcome. This idealistic view is, however, a far cry from the real world. This paper provides a set of general guiding principles for culture management in organisations. Leaders and managers are advised to formulate an overall strategy, develop cultural leaders, share the culture by communicating effectively with staff, measure performance and communicate culture in all dealings with customers. These five distinct, yet related, elements are essential if culture management is to be successful, and so this paper argues that for organisational success, all five must ultimately merge to form one unified whole.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Donna B. Smith

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Joy Lawson Davis, Donna Y. Ford, James L. Moore and Erinn Fears Floyd

The nature of rural living is often characterized as remote, limited in social and academic experiences and opportunities, and predominantly White and low income. For…

Abstract

The nature of rural living is often characterized as remote, limited in social and academic experiences and opportunities, and predominantly White and low income. For Black gifted students, these characterizations define daily isolation and alienation, accompanied by racially oppressive conditions that cause stress and give constant reminders of their oppressed group status, despite their high intellectual, academic, affective, and creative potential. These conditions, coupled with the misnomer that being a rural student means that one must be from the dominant culture, render them invisible on many social and demographic variables. Most scholarly research related to rural education focuses on one demographic – poor White students from Appalachian, Midwest, or Southern communities. While most of the literature focuses on this demographic, the majority of Black gifted students living in rural areas are located in the southern region of the United States. The Black rural community, including Black gifted students, is almost invisible in literature explicating the conditions of rural education in America. This chapter takes an updated look at Black gifted students in rural America based on our previous work on this population. We explore where these students reside, the traits that make them unique, which includes attention to culture, and make recommendations for future research and programming to meet their intellectual, academic, creative, and psychosocial needs with attention to access, equity, and excellence.

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2012

Tom Downen

As described in the z-Tree (Zurich Toolbox for Readymade Economic Experiments) tutorial (Fischbacher, 2002), use of the z-Tree software for designing and administering…

Abstract

As described in the z-Tree (Zurich Toolbox for Readymade Economic Experiments) tutorial (Fischbacher, 2002), use of the z-Tree software for designing and administering research experiments is quite straightforward. z-Tree is likely to be a viable alternative for accounting researchers interested in administering a computerized experimental game, and it could offer some advantages over web-based administration or use of complicated spreadsheet tools. With little or no programming experience and no familiarity with z-Tree, a researcher can likely program the example experiment described herein to be functional within a day and ready to administer within a week. Thus, one appeal of z-Tree is the ease of programming and execution and possibly reduced investment of time by the researcher. This tutorial describes use of the z-Tree software to program a noninteractive accounting research experiment; as such, it should serve as a supplemental and more specific tutorial, with many illustrations, for accounting researchers considering using the z-Tree program.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-758-1

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1964

ON April 23rd this year, when all countries in the world will be celebrating the Quater‐centenary of Shakespeare's birthday, the Shakespeare Memorial Library in Birmingham…

Abstract

ON April 23rd this year, when all countries in the world will be celebrating the Quater‐centenary of Shakespeare's birthday, the Shakespeare Memorial Library in Birmingham will have attained a majority of one hundred years. Although founded in 1864 the scope of the library was first envisaged by George Dawson, President of the local Shakespeare club in a letter to Aris's Birmingham Gazette of 1861.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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